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Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price at a March 17 news conference with Reps. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., and Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

6 Changes The Trump Administration Can Still Make To Obamacare

The Republican overhaul bill died, but the health care drama continues. There are lots of ways the Trump administration can change regulations and how the Affordable Care Act is administered — without congressional approval.

David Robert Daleiden (right) leaves a courtroom after a hearing in Houston. California prosecutors say two anti-abortion activists who made undercover videos of themselves trying to buy fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood have been charged with 15 felony counts of invasion of privacy. State Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the charges Tuesday. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

2 Activists Who Secretly Recorded Planned Parenthood Face New Felony Charges

A Texas judge dismissed earlier felony charges against anti-abortion rights activists David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt. Now they face charges in California for allegedly recording people without permission.

Chelsea Beck/NPR

Code Switch

Sanctuary Churches: Who Controls The Story?

This week on the podcast, Adrian Florido tackles this debate: When immigrants facing deportation seek sanctuary, should they make their stories public? Do they decide or does the church?

Sanctuary Churches: Who Controls The Story?

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Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street on her way to the House of Commons in London on Wednesday to announce that Britain is set to formally file for divorce from the European Union. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Brexit Gets Real: Prime Minister May Has Triggered U.K.'s Exit From EU

"This is an historic moment, from which there can be no turning back. Britain is leaving the European Union," British Prime Minister Theresa May tells the House of Commons.

An M-44 device — also known as a "cyanide bomb" for the way it sprays sodium cyanide — sits nested between two rocks. Several petitions are now calling for the removal of these devices used to protect livestock from predators. Mark Mansfield, father of a boy accidentally sprayed March 16 in Idaho, calls M-44s "neither safe nor humane." Bannock County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bannock County Sheriff's Office

The Two-Way - News Blog

Calls Mount For Ban On 'Cyanide Bombs' After Death Of Family Pet

An M-44, which sprays predators with sodium cyanide, detonated on a teen and his dog earlier this month in Idaho. Now the family and others are petitioning the USDA to end its use of the devices.

Michael Sharp visited Elizabeth Namavu and children in Mubimbi Camp, home to displaced persons in the Democratic Republic of Congo, during his time in the country. When he was killed, he was part of a U.N. mission. Jana Asenbrennerova/Courtesy of MCC hide caption

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Jana Asenbrennerova/Courtesy of MCC

Goats and Soda

U.N. Human Rights Investigators Killed In Democratic Republic Of The Congo

An American, Michael Sharp, and a Swede, Zaida Catalan, went missing while traveling in the country. Authorities confirmed Tuesday that their remains and those of their interpreter were found.

Vials of the HPV vaccination drug Gardasil. Doctors and public health experts say the new version of the vaccine could protect more people against cancer. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

HPV Vaccine Could Protect More People With Fewer Doses, Doctors Insist

Kaiser Health News

In the U.S., there are about 39,000 cancers associated with the human papillomavirus each year. Doctors say the new HPV vaccine may help reduce the number of cases.

Negotiations to redevelop an office tower owned by the family of President Donald Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, at 666 5th Avenue in Manhattan have unraveled. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Kushner Family, China's Anbang End Talks Over Manhattan Real Estate Deal

Anbang had discussed investing more than $400 million to redevelop an office tower owned by Kushner Companies — a deal that raised ethical concerns.

Bob Dylan speaks onstage at the MusiCares 2015 Person Of The Year Gala in Los Angeles. Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in October — though he has not yet accepted it. The Swedish Academy has announced he plans to do so this weekend in Stockholm. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Bob Dylan Agrees To Accept His Nobel Prize During A Tour Stop In Stockholm

Since the American musician won the Nobel Prize in Literature last year, he hasn't picked up his award in person or delivered the customary lecture required to receive the prize money.

Members of the Brooklyn Youth Chorus perform in Bryce Dessner's Black Mountain Songs at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Julieta Cervantes hide caption

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Julieta Cervantes

Deceptive Cadence

In 'Childhood's Retreat,' A Boy Climbs A Tree To View The Man He's Become

The collaborative spirit of Black Mountain College — once home to the likes of John Cage and Willem de Kooning — lives on in a theatrical song cycle performed by the Brooklyn Youth Chorus.

Childhood's Retreat

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Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

All Tech Considered

As Congress Repeals Internet Privacy Rules, Putting Your Options In Perspective

President Trump is expected to sign a bill to overturn new privacy rules for Internet service providers. An expert says there are steps you can take, though they won't deliver absolute privacy.

Summer Zervos, shown with attorney Gloria Allred on earlier this year in Washington, D.C., accuses President Trump of sexual harassment and has filed a lawsuit against him. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Politics

Trump Lawyers Claim Immunity In Sex Harassment Suit, Just As Bill Clinton Did

Summer Zervos, a former contestant on The Apprentice, says President Trump engaged in "disgusting touching." His legal team wants the case dismissed, at least until after he leaves the White House.

President Trump hosts Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe last month at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. North Korea tested a missile during Abe's visit and guests at the club overhead the two leaders discussing the incident. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Politics

GAO Agrees To Review Costs Of Trump's Trips To Mar-A-Lago

The Government Accountability Office has agreed to review costs and security measures associated with President Trump's visits to Mar-a-Lago. Trump has spent five weekends there since taking office.

GAO Agrees To Review Costs Of Trump's Trips To Mar-A-Lago

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(From left) Renee Chaney, visitor Louisa Parker, Linda Wertheimer and Kris Mortensen, in the first All Things Considered studio in 1972. NPR hide caption

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NPR

The Two-Way - News Blog

First Episode Of 'All Things Considered' Is Headed To Library Of Congress

The NPR program's inaugural 1971 broadcast has been added to the National Recording Registry, alongside other "aural treasures" like Judy Garland's "Over the Rainbow." Take a listen to the first show!

First Episode Of 'All Things Considered' Is Headed To Library Of Congress

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