Two members of the U.S. Army lead the pack in the 5,000 meters at the U.S. Olympic Trials earlier this month in Eugene, Ore. Shadrack Kipchirchir (right), did not make the team in the 5,000, but did qualify in the 10,000. Paul Chelimo (second from right), qualifed in the 5,000. Tom Banse/Northwest News Network hide caption

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The Torch

Fast-Track Program: Kenyan Runners Join U.S. Army — And Olympic Team

Northwest News Network

A U.S. Army program allows elite athletes to join the military and train in their sport. Four Kenyan distance runners in the U.S. military quickly became citizens and will represent America in Rio.

Every day, hundreds of patients wait to be seen at the Munhava health center in Mozambique's port city of Beira. Morgana Wingard hide caption

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Goats and Soda

The Sole Doctor In The Hospital Shoulders The Burden Of HIV

Dr. Marlen Baroso works at the health center in Beira, a port city in Mozambique. She treats patients with ailments, accident victims, women in labor — and thousands of people with HIV.

The Sole Doctor In The Hospital Shoulders The Burden Of HIV

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Turkish Land Forces commander Salih Zeki Colak (right), naval commander Admiral Bulent Bostanoglu (second right) and air force commander Abidin Unal (left) attend a funeral in Ankara on July 18 for police officers killed during the failed July 15 coup attempt. Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels - World News

After Failed Coup, How Will Turkey's Military Cope With All Its Challenges?

The Turkish armed forces have long been a point of national pride. Turks are glad last week's coup attempt failed, but are now left with a demoralized, weakened force at a time of critical challenges.

After Failed Coup, How Will Turkey's Military Cope With All Its Challenges?

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French flags are seen lowered at half-staff in Nice on July 16. The truck attack on July 14 killed 84 people. "I felt coming to celebrate on holiday and people are in mourning didn't seem right," one vacationer says. "But I'm glad I came." Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels - World News

In Nice, Residents And Tourists Struggle To Adjust After Attack

After last week's truck attack, "We're lost," says one resident. "We just don't know how to deal with it. We're living in endless doubt."

Wendy Chase directs the UConn Speech and Hearing Clinic. It provides help for transgender people working to change how they speak. Bret Eckhardt /Courtesy of Wendy Chase hide caption

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Humans

Helping Transgender People Find Their Voice

Speech therapist Wendy Chase helps transgender people make their voices sound like their gender identity. She says how people communicate affects how they are perceived.

Helping Transgender People Find Their Voice

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Violent Femmes perform at the 2016 Newport Folk Festival. Adam Kissick for NPR hide caption

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Newport Folk Festival

LISTEN: Violent Femmes Play The Newport Folk Festival

The off-again, on-again rock band from Milwaukee, Wis., built a careening, playful set around mainstays like "Blister In The Sun" and new songs like "I Could Be Anything."

Violent Femmes, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2016

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A typical hoverfly (Spilomyia diophthalma) Fredrik Sjöberg/Fredrik Sjöberg hide caption

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Science

The Uppermost Aristocracy of the Hoverfly Society

Fredrik Sjöberg had been hunting for hoverflies for 30 years. But his collection wasn't complete without the rare and beautiful Callicera fly.

The Uppermost Aristocracy of the Hoverfly Society

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In Arlington, Va., WeLive developers say that what residents give up in personal square footage is made up for with large communal areas. WeLive hide caption

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Business

They're Small, But These Big-City Apartments Tout Their Communal Feel

For those eyeing city life, the trick to paying reasonable rent might mean downsizing — really downsizing. Developers of micro apartments says they offer affordability and a sense of community.

They're Small, But These Big-City Apartments Tout Their Communal Feel

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Born This Way is produced by Jonathan Murray, the co-creator of MTV's Real World. Above, cast members Cristina Sanz (left), Rachel Osterbach, Steven Clark and Sean McElwee (top). Adam Taylor/A&E hide caption

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Shots - Health News

A Cast With Down Syndrome Brings Fresh Reality To Reality TV

With the Emmy-nominated Born this Way poised to begin its second season July 26, the cast, co-creator and fans explain why the show has become such a hit.

A Cast With Down Syndrome Brings Fresh Reality To Reality TV

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Kidlington is home to a number of 17th century cottages near its medieval church. This is the most historic part of the village, but it's not where the tourists went. Instead, tour buses dropped them off in a residential area built in the 1960s and 1970s. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Parallels - World News

Why Did Busloads Of Asian Tourists Suddenly Arrive In This English Village?

Residents of Kidlington awoke one morning to find hundreds of foreign tourists snapping photos on their front lawns. For six weeks, the visitors continued to come by the busload. Then they vanished.

Author Interviews

In Dave Eggers' Latest, A Mother Moves Her Kids To The Alaskan Frontier

Alaska's a state that's "not too precious about itself," Eggers says. In Heroes of the Frontier, he follows an out-of-work dentist as she moves her small family to an unfamiliar home.

In Dave Eggers' Latest, A Mother Moves Her Kids To The Alaskan 'Frontier'

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