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On Monday, workers and emergency responders look at a warehouse in which a fire late Friday claimed the lives of at least 36 people on in Oakland, Calif. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Oakland Warehouse Manager Tells 'Today' Show: 'I Am Incredibly Sorry'

Derick Almena leased and managed the warehouse known as "Ghost Ship," which burned down over the weekend, killing at least 36 people. He gave an agonized, frequently tense interview on the Today show.

President-elect Donald Trump spoke last Friday with Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen. In her first public comments, Tsai said Tuesday that observers should not read too much into the conversation. "I do not foresee major policy shifts in the near future," she told Western journalists. Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP

Parallels - World News

A Phone Call With Trump 'Doesn't Mean A Policy Shift,' Taiwan's President Says

In her first comments since her talk with Donald Trump, President Tsai Ing-wen says she does not foresee "major policy shifts." She spoke with Western journalists, including NPR's William Dobson.

Taiwan's President: Phone Call With Trump 'Doesn't Mean A Policy Shift'

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The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

All Tech Considered

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

There is currently no government regulation around the Internet of things, and Security technologist Bruce Schneier fears it will take a disaster for that to change.

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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Thursday marks the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The history of the attack is clear, yet the conspiracy that President Franklin D. Roosevelt allowed the attack to take place in order to draw America into the war never dies. Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Express/Getty Images

History

No, FDR Did Not Know The Japanese Were Going To Bomb Pearl Harbor

There's no evidence to support it, but the conspiracy theory that President Franklin Roosevelt knew beforehand about Pearl Harbor refuses to die, to the consternation of World War II historians.

No, FDR Did Not Know The Japanese Were Going To Bomb Pearl Harbor

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Kara Salim, 26, got out of the Marion County, Indiana, jail in 2015 with a history of domestic-violence charges, bipolar disorder and alcoholism — and without Medicaid coverage. As a result, she couldn't afford the fees for court-ordered therapy. Philip Scott Andrews for KHN hide caption

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Philip Scott Andrews for KHN

Shots - Health News

Signed Out Of Prison But Not Signed Up For Health Insurance

Most of the state prison systems in the places that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare have come up short on enrolling exiting inmates, despite the fact that many of them are chronically ill.

Signed Out Of Prison But Not Signed Up For Health Insurance

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If you haven't had at least seven hours of sleep in the last 24, you probably shouldn't be behind the wheel, traffic safety data suggests. Katja Kircher/Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Katja Kircher/Maskot/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

Drivers Beware: Crash Rate Spikes With Every Hour Of Lost Sleep

An analysis of car accidents found that drivers who slept only five or six hours in the previous 24 had nearly twice the accident rate of drivers who slept a full seven hours or more.