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Gregory Matthews has glaucoma and uses prescription eyedrops. The dropper's opening creates a bigger drop than he needs, causing him to run out of his medication before the prescription is ready to refill. Matt Roth for ProPublica hide caption

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Matt Roth for ProPublica

Drug Companies Make Eyedrops Too Big, And You Pay For The Waste

ProPublica

When eyedrops dribble down your face, it's not your fault. Drugmakers have long known that their drops of medicine exceed the capacity of the human eye. Why didn't companies make the drops smaller?

Jesus Campos, the hotel security guard who was shot the night that Stephen Paddock killed 58 people, gave his first media interview to Ellen DeGeneres. The shooter fired from windows he broke in a suite at the Mandalay Bay, pictured on Oct. 2, the day after the massacre. David Becker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images

Wounded Mandalay Bay Security Guard Gives First Media Interview On 'Ellen'

After he was shot, Jesus Campos yelled "Take cover!" at a hotel engineer and a guest as the Las Vegas gunman sprayed bullets into the hall. His account added detail to the timeline of events Oct. 1.

Omar Jadwat (center), director of the ACLU's Immigrants' Rights Project, speaks outside a federal courthouse in Greenbelt, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Federal Judge In Maryland Blocks Trump's Latest Travel Ban Attempt

The plaintiffs "have established that they are likely to succeed on the merits," District Judge Theodore Chuang wrote in dealing another setback to the Trump administration's attempt to ban travel to the U.S. by citizens of certain countries.

China's President Xi Jinping gives a speech at the opening session of the Chinese Communist Party Congress on Wednesday. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images

5 Years Ago, China's Xi Jinping Was Largely Unknown. Now He's Poised To Reshape China

China's president has embraced a strongman style of personal rule. The 19th Communist Party Congress, now underway in Beijing, is expected to strengthen his ability to bend the system to his will.

Amazon's Seattle campus has ballooned in size as the company became one of the world's fast-growing businesses. Now, cities are deciding how much they are willing to give to lure Amazon's second headquarters. Jordan Stead/Amazon hide caption

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Jordan Stead/Amazon

'A Major Distraction': Is A Mega-Deal Like Amazon's HQ2 Always Worth It?

Amazon's unmatched promise of 50,000 well-paying jobs has red carpets rolling out across the U.S. — but also some soul-searching: How much should communities subsidize wealthy American corporations?

'A Major Distraction': Is A Megadeal Like Amazon's HQ2 Always Worth It?

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Debbie Wolfe looks at the antique pitcher that once belonged to her grandmother after finding it the burned ruins of her home on Tuesday in Santa Rosa, Calif. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A Third Of California's Fire Evacuees Still Waiting To Go Home

Some 34,000 of the 100,000 people forced to flee the blazes are still under evacuation orders. Authorities said they were getting close to containing the largest of the fires in northern California.

LA Johnson/NPR

A Year Of Love And Struggle In A New High School

When this new boys-only, public school in Washington, D.C., opened its doors in August 2016 to a class of roughly 100 freshmen of color, NPR and Education Week were there. All. Year.

A Year Of Love And Struggle In A New High School

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In trying to get people to eat the Pez Diablo, or suckermouth catfish, sustainable fisheries specialist Mike Mitchell says it isn't "a problem of biology or science, but marketing." DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DeAgostini/Getty Images

Invasive 'Devil Fish' Plague Mexico's Waters. Can't Beat 'Em? Eat 'Em

The armored catfish erodes shorelines and devastates marine plants — and its numbers have exploded. So researchers, chefs and fishermen are trying to rebrand it by promoting its flavor and nutrition.

"How is [Keith] Olbermann on my side of the fence (politics) but not on my side (hip hop)?" The Roots' Questlove pondered before creating his Keith O Challenge crash course. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for MTV/Getty Images for Paley Center for Media hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for MTV/Getty Images for Paley Center for Media

Why Questlove's 201-Song Playlist For Keith Olbermann Is Bigger Than Hip-Hop

Or, how I became the third wheel in a weekend Twitter beef over rap, culture and politics following Eminem's Trump tirade.

Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington filed a suit just three days after President Trump took office. The suit alleges he is violating the Constitution's ban on accepting foreign payments, or emoluments. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Court Challenge Begins: Is Trump Taking Unconstitutional Emoluments?

On Wednesday, a federal judge will hear arguments in a case that asks: Is President Trump taking the kind of benefits banned by the Constitution? Step 1 is deciding whether the plaintiffs have standing.

The Court Challenge Begins: Is Trump Taking Unconstitutional Emoluments?

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Daphne Caruana Galizia, seen earlier this year outside a courthouse in Malta. A car bomb killed the journalist Tuesday. Matthew Mirabelli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Mirabelli/AFP/Getty Images

'Now That She Has Been Killed, Who Will Ensure That Justice Will Prevail?'

The killing of Maltese reporter Daphne Caruana Galizia has drawn international condemnations and difficult questions, including this one from a local paper. "My mother was assassinated," her son said.

Macaques are social animals, whether in a group enclosure like this one at the Gelsenkircen zoo in western Germany, or in the wild. But many research monkeys are still housed in separate cages. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs

Enhancing a research monkey's life by housing it with a pal often doesn't hurt the study, says a researcher who has done it. In her own experience, she says, "it actually helped to improve the science."

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs

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