The rellenong manok at La Cocina de Tita Moning, a restaurant in Manila. Chef Suzette Monitnola uses a traditional recipe from the 1930s that belonged to her grandmother. Aurora Almendral for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Aurora Almendral for NPR

The Salt

A History Lesson On The Philippines, Stuffed In A Christmas Chicken

Rellenong manok is a deboned chicken filled with a jumble of ingredients. If it seems hard to pin down how this dish got all its fillings, it's because of the complexity of Filipino culture.

The photographer thought it was a goat. The photo editor thought it was a goat. Sure looked like a goat to the author of this post. It turns out to be a sheep, in Dakar, Senegal. Claire Harbage for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Claire Harbage for NPR

Goats and Soda

Is This A Goat Or A Sheep? It's Harder Than You Think

True confession: Our editors mistook a sheep for a goat. Now we've learned a lot about how cool sheep really are. Maybe our blog should be "Sheep and Soda?"

A couple walks on the beach in the resort area of Varadero, Cuba. Varadero is home to upscale hotels and resorts that cater to foreign tourists, but there aren't yet enough to handle a potential influx of Americans. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Latin America

Ready To Hit The Cuban Beach? Americans Still Have To Wait

Travel to Cuba for business or education will be much easier as the U.S. eases restrictions, but until the embargo is completely lifted, going to Cuba simply for tourism still won't be allowed.

Doug Neville (left) and Ryan Johnson have been friends for three decades. They met shortly before Neville found out he was HIV-positive. StoryCorps hide caption

itoggle caption StoryCorps

StoryCorps

30 Years Of Friendship, Through Fear And An Uncertain Future

Doug Neville and Ryan Johnson met shortly before Neville learned he was HIV-positive and began living with the specter of death. "I didn't know what I was going to do if you died," Johnson says.

Tunisian voter Dina Ghlisse, 19, displays her finger with the indelible ink mark after voting in La Marsa, on the outskirts of Tunis, on Sunday. More than three years after Tunisia sparked the Arab Spring across the Middle East, the country is choosing a president. Hassene Dridi/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Hassene Dridi/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Tunisia, Cradle Of Arab Spring, In Historic Presidential Vote

The election pits interim President Moncef Marzouki against challenger Beji Caid Essebsi, who held a post in the ousted regime of Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

An unmanned aerial vehicle films vineyards in France. Drones like this one are also being used in Califiornia, as part of a broader "precision farming" movement designed to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Sami Sarkis/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Sami Sarkis/Ocean/Corbis

The Salt

In Wineries Vs. Weather, Drones To The Rescue? Ozy.com

Rising temperatures have hastened harvest dates in Sonoma County — and they're changing grape-growing patterns around the world. Vineyards are responding with everything from sunscreen to sensors.

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Ozy.com

Diren Dede, a 17-year-old German exchange student, was fatally shot in the head and arm when he entered the garage of Markus Kaarma in Missoula, Mont., on April 27. Kaarma claimed it was self-defense, but a Montana jury recently found him guilty of deliberate homicide. Oliver Hardt/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Oliver Hardt/Getty Images

Around the Nation

Montana Shooter Found Guilty Despite State's 'Castle Doctrine' MTPR

More than 30 states have laws that allow people to use deadly force if they have a reasonable fear for their life or property. But this week, a Montana jury said that type of law has its limits.

From member station

MTPR

Tiny Desk Concerts

Lucinda Williams: A Voice Like No Other

She came to the desk a little unsure, and left singing "West Memphis" with intensity and passion. Williams' voice shines in these intimate moments.

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