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President Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk across the tarmac before boarding Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport Sunday to return to Washington. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Trump Returns To Washington, Seeking New Afghanistan Policy And Overall Reset

After a none-too-restful "working vacation," President Trump is back in the White House today. He's planning a prime-time address to the country on his latest strategy for the war in Afghanistan.

Damage to the portside is visible as the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain steers toward Changi naval base in Singapore following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC on Monday. Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/AP hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/AP

Search For 10 Missing Launched Off Singapore After U.S. Destroyer, Tanker Collide

The Navy says the guided missile destroyer sustained "significant damage" in the collision east of the Strait of Malacca, one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world.

South Korean soldiers participate in an anti-terror and anti-chemical terror exercise Ulchi Freedom Guardian exercise last year. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Fresh Threats From Pyongyang As Joint Military Exercise Begins

The annual drill between U.S. and South Korean troops comes in the wake of a bitter back-and-forth between North Korea and President Trump.

Fresh Threats From Pyongyang As Joint Military Exercise Begins

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Lillie Pete sifts the juniper ash before adding it to her blue corn mush. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

To Get Calcium, Navajos Burn Juniper Branches To Eat The Ash

KJZZ

Most American Indians are lactose intolerant, which means they need to find nutrients outside of dairy sources. It turns out that a return to traditional cooking methods can be key to good health.

To Get Calcium, Navajos Burn Juniper Branches To Eat The Ash

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Rosendo Gil, a family support worker with the Imperial County, Calif., home visiting program, has visited Blas Lopez and his fiancée Lluvia Padilla dozens of times since their daughter was born three years ago. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Home Visits Help Parents Overcome Tough Histories, Raise Healthy Children

Kaiser Health News

A program that provides $400 million in federal funds for the visits expires next month. Advocates and providers hope it will be reauthorized and even expanded, saying it's money well spent.

Jerry Lewis, Comic Icon And Titan Of Telethons, Dies At 91

Lewis, whose comedic duo with Dean Martin launched him to the peak of showbiz, starred and directed in dozens of films. He was perhaps just as famous for his charity work fighting muscular dystrophy.

Ferrari race cars are lined up at dawn on Pebble Beach Golf Links' 18th green at during the 67th Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. California's Monterey Peninsula is home to the renowned car show that displays the most exotic, rare, and the most expensive cars in the world. Bruce W. Talamon for NPR hide caption

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Bruce W. Talamon for NPR

PHOTOS: Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Showcases Most Exotic, Rare, Expensive Cars

This year's Concours features 204 of the best cars that have ever been made. The 67th annual event caps off a week of intensive, obsessive car love in Monterey Peninsula, Calif.

Crews worked to remove the statue of Supreme Court judge and segregationist Roger Taney from the front lawn of the Maryland State House late Thursday night. Taney wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision that defended slavery and said black Americans could never be citizens. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Confederate Statues Were Built To Further A 'White Supremacist Future'

President Trump hasn't mentioned it as he's defended the memorabilia over the past week, but historians say the statues were originally built to send a clear message to black Americans.

For 30 years, Daryl Davis has spent time befriending members of the Ku Klux Klan. He says 200 Klansmen have given up their robes after talking with him. Courtesy of Daryl Davis hide caption

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Courtesy of Daryl Davis

How One Man Convinced 200 Ku Klux Klan Members To Give Up Their Robes

One by one, Daryl Davis has befriended KKK members over the past 30 years. The more they got to know the African-American musician, the more they realized the Klan was not for them.

How One Man Convinced 200 Ku Klux Klan Members To Give Up Their Robes

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Dick Gregory, known for his sharp commentary on race relations during the 1960s civil rights movement, was considered a pioneer in using satire to address social issues. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Comedian And Civil Rights Activist Dick Gregory Dies At 84

Gregory was known for his sharp satire, political activism and health advocacy. He went on multiple hunger strikes to protest issues like the Vietnam War and police brutality.

Abraham Lincoln warned that "A house divided against itself cannot stand." Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Racial Issues Have Often Been A Test for U.S. Presidents With Conflicted Feelings

President Eisenhower was not a fan of the 1954 Supreme Court order against segregated schools; but he sent the 101st Airborne Division to Little Rock, Ark., to ensure it was enforced at Central High.

Racial Issues Have Often Been A Test for U.S. Presidents With Conflicted Feelings

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Congressmen Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., Kevin Brady of Texas, Peter Roskam, R-Ill. and Dave Schweikert R-Ariz., stand outside Rancho del Cielo in California, where they were crafting a tax overhaul. Susan Davis/NPR hide caption

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Susan Davis/NPR

Republicans Plead With Trump To Get On, And Stay On, Message To Pass A Tax Overhaul

While the president was laying blame on "both sides" for violence in Charlottesville, Republicans were meeting to hammer out a tax overhaul. But they worry about whether Trump can make the sale.

Counterprotesters assemble at the Statehouse before a planned "Free Speech" rally by conservative organizers begins on the adjacent Boston Common, on Saturday. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Boston Right-Wing 'Free Speech' Rally Dwarfed By Counterprotesters

Thousands of counterprotesters gathered in Boston Common to meet the rally participants, who said they have no connection to those who perpetrated violence in Charlottesville, Va., last week.

President Trump speaks on the phone Jan. 28 with Russia's Putin, flanked by top aides, from left, Reince Priebus, Vice President Pence, Steve Bannon, Sean Spicer and Michael Flynn. Only Pence remains. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What Trump's Increasing Isolation Could Mean For His Presidency

The president has completed a full purge of top White House aides instrumental in his election. Their ouster could be a big gamble, as Trump finds himself with fewer and fewer allies.