Hillary Clinton, seen on a T.V. camera monitor in 2013, has been criticized for not holding more press conferences. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Media

Has Hillary Clinton Actually Been Dodging The Press?

Clinton has been criticized for failing to give enough access to the press, but she says she's done more than 300 interviews. According to an NPR analysis, that's only part of the story.

Has Hillary Clinton Actually Been Dodging The Press?

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Tsukimi Ayano's scarecrows congregate at a bus stop in the Nagoro. The village used to be home to about 300 people but now there are 30. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Parallels - World News

A Dying Japanese Village Brought Back To Life — By Scarecrows

A remote mountain village once was home to hundreds. Now it has just 30 residents. Tskukimi Ayano, who at 67 is one of the younger ones, has repopulated the village with scarecrow-like figures.

A Dying Japanese Village Brought Back To Life — By Scarecrows

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Smoke wafts over the highway linking the Bolivian capital of La Paz with the Chilean border during an ongoing clash between striking miners, who are blockading the road, and police. Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

In Bolivia, Striking Miners Kidnap And Kill High-Level Minister

The country's deputy interior minister was on his way to talk with the miners about their demands. Officials say he was seized Thursday and then beaten to death.

Debris from flood-damaged homes lines Highway 167 in Maurice, La. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Around the Nation

Locals In Flooded Rural Areas Of Louisiana Say Aid Is Slow To Arrive

In Baton Rouge, the recovery is underway after historic floods devastated the southern part of the state. But aid is slower to reach more remote, rural areas that were also hit hard by the rains.

Locals In Flooded Rural Areas Of Louisiana Say Aid Is Slow To Arrive

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Lenroy Watt talks with residents of Miami's Little Haiti about Zika, leaving brochures in Creole about how to prevent the illness, as well as phone numbers for local mosquito control agencies and the county health department. Courtesy of Planned Parenthood hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

The organization is going door to door in some of the city's poorest neighborhoods. The goal: Reach 25,000 households in six weeks with information about Zika prevention and family planning services.

Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

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Lenny Zimmel puts Colby cheese curds into forms to make 40 pounds blocks of cheese at the Widmer's Cheese Cellars in Theresa, Wis. Record dairy production in the U.S. has produced a record surplus of cheese, causing prices to drop. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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The Salt

America's Real Mountain Of Cheese Is On Our Plates

To help dairy farmers hurt by a glut, the USDA said this week it'll buy $20 million worth of cheese and give it to food banks. But we eat so much of the stuff, that's hardly a drop in the bucket.

America's Real Mountain Of Cheese Is On Our Plates

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A project now under construction in Cleveland will eventually house the Case Western Reserve University's medical, dental and nursing schools, as well as the Cleveland Clinic's in-house medical school. Courtesy of Cleveland Clinic hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Teaching Medical Teamwork Right From The Start

Kaiser Health News

Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic are collaborating to better integrate the training of student doctors, dentists, nurses and social workers. One goal: Reduce medical errors.

Teaching Medical Teamwork Right From The Start

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Alabama's new cursive law is aimed at making sure that state's students know how to perform important life tasks, such as signing their name, says its sponsor, state Rep. Dickie Drake. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Education

Cursive Law Writes New Chapter For Handwriting In Alabama's Schools

Troy Public Radio

Schools in Alabama were already required to teach cursive writing, but a new law now requires schools to provide cursive instruction by the end of the third grade, and report proficiency levels.

Cursive Law Writes New Chapter For Handwriting In Alabama's Schools

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Frank Mutz, 67, and his son Phil, 36. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

When The Family Business Is Keeping Cool, It Pays To Be Warm With People

More than six decades since Frank Mutz's grandfather started in the air conditioning business, Frank runs the same company with his children. They've also passed down common sense and personal warmth.

When The Family Business Is Keeping Cool, It Pays To Be Warm With People

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Floyd Norman was Disney's first African-American animator. He's shown above in 1956, working as an "apprentice inbetweener" on Sleeping Beauty. Michael Flore Films/Falco Ink. hide caption

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Movie Interviews

At 81, Disney's First African-American Animator Is Still In The Studio

First hired in the 1950s, Floyd Norman is still drawing. "Creative people don't hang it up," he says. "We don't walk away, we don't want to sit in a lawn chair. ... We want to continue to work. "

At 81, Disney's First African-American Animator Is Still In The Studio

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These are insect cells infected with the Guaico Culex virus. The different colors denote cells infected with different pieces of the virus. Only the brown-colored cells are infectious, because they contain the complete virus. Michael Lindquist/Cell Press hide caption

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Goats and Soda

New Virus Breaks The Rules Of Infection

A virus is generally like a little ball with a few genes. Now scientists have found one that's broken up into five little balls — as if it were dismembered.

RuPaul on the set of his hit reality show, RuPaul's Drag Race. Logo TV hide caption

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Pop Culture

Shante, He Stays: RuPaul Reflects On Decades Of Drag — And 2 Emmy Nominations

RuPaul is the most recognizable drag queen in America. His hit show, RuPaul's Drag Race is up for two Emmy Awards as it begins filming its ninth season. But drag, he says, will never be mainstream.

Shante, He Stays: RuPaul Reflects On Decades Of Drag — And 2 Emmy Nominations

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