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Gregory Matthews has glaucoma and uses prescription eyedrops. The dropper's opening creates a bigger drop than he needs, causing him to run out of his medication before the prescription is ready to refill. Matt Roth for ProPublica hide caption

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Matt Roth for ProPublica

Drug Companies Make Eyedrops Too Big, And You Pay For The Waste

ProPublica

When eyedrops dribble down your face, it's not your fault. Drugmakers have long known that their drops of medicine exceed the capacity of the human eye. Why didn't companies make the drops smaller?

Sens. Patty Murray, D-Wash. (left), and Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., say they have a tentative agreement to appropriate the subsidies for the next two years, restore money used to encourage people to sign up for Affordable Care Act health plans and make it easier for states to design their own alternative health care systems. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Senators Reach Deal To Stabilize ACA Insurance Markets For 2 Years

The bipartisan agreement could help stabilize insurance premiums next year so that younger, healthier people will buy policies. President Trump has embraced it, but other GOP leaders have not.

President Trump participates in a series of radio interviews in the Indian Treaty Room of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on Tuesday. Among the topics he discussed was his and past presidents' policies on reaching out to families of service members who have died. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

'Trump's Claim Is Wrong': Comments On Presidents' Calls To Military Families Rebutted

Defending his lack of response to the deaths of U.S. soldiers in Niger, Donald Trump claimed "a lot of" past presidents did not call families after a death. He raised the example of his chief of staff's son.

Amazon's Seattle campus has ballooned in size as the company became one of the world's fast-growing businesses. Now, cities are deciding how much they are willing to give to lure Amazon's second headquarters. Jordan Stead/Amazon hide caption

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Jordan Stead/Amazon

'A Major Distraction': Is A Mega-Deal Like Amazon's HQ2 Always Worth It?

Amazon's unmatched promise of 50,000 well-paying jobs has red carpets rolling out across the U.S. — but also some soul-searching: How much should communities subsidize wealthy American corporations?

'A Major Distraction': Is A Mega-Deal Like Amazon's HQ2 Always Worth It?

Audio will be available later today.
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A Year Of Love And Struggle In A New High School

When this new, boys-only, public school in Washington D.C. opened its doors in August 2016 to a class of roughly 100 freshmen of color, NPR and Education Week were there. All. Year.

A Year Of Love And Struggle In A New High School

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Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington filed a suit just three days after President Trump took office. The suit alleges he is violating the Constitution's ban on accepting foreign payments, or emoluments. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Court Challenge Begins: Is Trump Taking Unconstitutional Emoluments?

On Wednesday, a federal judge will hear arguments in a case that asks: Is President Trump taking the kind of benefits banned by the Constitution? Step 1 is deciding whether the plaintiffs have standing.

The Court Challenge Begins: Is Trump Taking Unconstitutional Emoluments?

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People march as they participate in the '#NoMuslimBanEver' rally in downtown Los Angeles, Calif., on Sunday. The march organized by the Council on American-Islamic Relations was in response to President Trump's most recent travel ban, which has now been blocked by a federal judge in Hawaii. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Federal Judge In Hawaii Blocks Trump's Third Attempt At Travel Ban

President Trump's third executive order restricting travel from some countries to the U.S. was to go into effect on Wednesday. Like two previous efforts, it was swiftly challenged in several courts.

Italian descendants perform the Tarantella, a dance that originates from a spider bite, in Curitiba, Brazil. Orlando Kissner/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Kissner/AFP/Getty Images

The Folk Music Festival That Started With A Spider Bite

Night of the Taranta, an Italian folk music festival akin to Woodstock, celebrates a musical tradition that dates to antiquity.

The Folk Music Festival That Started With A Spider Bite

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Daphne Caruana Galizia, seen earlier this year outside a courthouse in Malta. A car bomb killed the journalist Tuesday. Matthew Mirabelli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Mirabelli/AFP/Getty Images

'Now That She Has Been Killed, Who Will Ensure That Justice Will Prevail?'

The killing of Maltese reporter Daphne Caruana Galizia has drawn international condemnations and difficult questions, including this one from a local paper. "My mother was assassinated," her son said.

A 2009 file photo of former Arkanas state Rep. David Dunn, at the Arkansas state Capitol in Little Rock. Dunn served on President Trump's commission investigating voter fraud before dying suddenly on Monday. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

A Death And More Questions For Trump's Voter Fraud Commission

One of the five Democratic commissioners died suddenly on Monday. Meanwhile, another Democratic commissioner complained about not receiving information or updates about the panel's work.

Macaques are social animals, whether in a group enclosure like this one at the Gelsenkircen zoo in western Germany, or in the wild. But many research monkeys are still housed in separate cages. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs

Enhancing a research monkey's life by housing it with a pal often doesn't hurt the study, says a researcher who has done it. In her own experience, she says, "it actually helped to improve the science."

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs

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