Latest Newscast

A woman holds a sign reading "Justice for Justine" during a march Thursday in Minneapolis. Several days of demonstrations have occurred after the death of Justine Damond, who was killed late Saturday by a police officer responding to her emergency call. Stephen Maturen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen Maturen/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Minneapolis Police Chief Resigns In Wake Of Officer Shooting Australian Woman

In a statement, Janee Harteau said that because of last week's killing and "other recent incidents," the force needs new leadership. The mayor said she and the city had lost confidence in the police chief.

Russian President Vladimir Putin leads a cabinet meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow on Wednesday. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alexei Nikolsky/AP

Parallels - World News

In Putin's Russia, An 'Adhocracy' Marked By Ambiguity And Plausible Deniability

Donald Trump Jr. found his meeting with Natalia Veselnitskaya a waste of time, but her approach fits into a larger pattern of freelance political activity that has come to characterize Putin's Russia.

In Putin's Russia, An 'Adhocracy' Marked By Ambiguity And Plausible Deniability

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538535186/538536109" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A federal judge on Friday ordered Kentucky taxpayers to pay more than $220,000 in attorney fees for same-sex couples and others who sued Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to issue marriage licenses. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Timothy D. Easley/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Kentucky Must Pay Attorney Fees For Couples Who Sued Kim Davis, Judge Says

Davis had refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, citing religious beliefs. The court held the state responsible because officials had the right to take action against her but didn't.

Ruins are all that remain of the 13th century Great Mosque of al-Nuri, where ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared three years ago that an Islamic state was rising again. ISIS blew the mosque up as Iraqi forces advanced. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jane Arraf/NPR

Parallels - World News

In Mosul, Grim Homecomings And A Struggle To Survive In A City Now Free From ISIS

Civil defense workers have recovered more than 1,400 bodies of civilians in west Mosul. Relatives are searching for the bodies of loved ones in a landscape so devastated they can barely recognize it.

President Gerald Ford shakes hands with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev on Nov. 24, 1974, in a meeting in the Soviet city of Vladivostok. Several weeks later, Ford signed a law that would place restrictions on Soviet trade with the U.S. for nearly four decades. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Politics

U.S. Sanctions Against Russia Never Go Away — They Just Evolve

When it comes to sanctions, the Cold War never really ended. As President Barack Obama lifted Soviet-era restrictions, he put in new ones. President Trump could soon find a sanctions bill on his desk.

Morris Kesler, chief technology officer at WiTricity, shows how a wireless charging pad can be installed on a table. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

All Tech Considered

A Future Of Gadgets Without Power Cords? Not So Fast

WBUR

This month, the first wireless-charging laptop hit the market. But making wireless power a standard consumer feature is a big technological — and psychological — challenge.

A Future Of Gadgets Without Power Cords? Not So Fast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538531750/538608518" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Former NFL football star O.J. Simpson enters for his parole hearing Thursday at the Lovelock Correctional Center in Lovelock, Nev. The panel decided Simpson could be released as early as October after serving 9 years in prison. Jason Bean/The Reno Gazette-Journal/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Bean/The Reno Gazette-Journal/AP

Analysis

With Parole, A New Round Of O.J. Obsession Begins

The athlete, celebrity and murder suspect was the focus of an intensely covered trial, and two recent TV series that set him at the center of America's diciest topics: race, wealth, justice and fame.

An empty coffee mug, left forlorn on the table. Federal regulators found that "New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee" had an ingredient similar to the active ingredient in Viagra. Ezra Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ezra Bailey/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

A Wake-Up Call: Coffee Recalled By FDA For Having Viagra-Like Ingredient

Regulators took issue with the tortuously named "New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee," which didn't declare a chemical akin to the erectile dysfunction drug's active ingredient.

Canvasser Ana Mejia gathers her supplies at the offices of the National Council of La Raza in Miami in 2016. The NCLR renamed itself UnidosUS this month, causing a rift in the U.S. Latino community. Some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Wilfredo Lee/AP

Code Switch

The Largest U.S. Latino Advocacy Group Changes Its Name, Sparking Debate

The National Council of La Raza renamed itself UnidosUS this month, causing a rift in the U.S. Latino community. Some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers and Fort Worth police officers detain an unauthorized immigrant from Mexico at an apartment complex. Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mito Habe-Evans/NPR

Around the Nation

Riding With ICE: 'We're Trying To Do The Right Thing'

Under President Trump, arrests by Immigration and Customs Enforcement have skyrocketed. Their actions have stoked outrage, but agents say they're misunderstood and they're just enforcing the law.

Riding With ICE: 'We're Trying To Do The Right Thing'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537894936/538251481" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. is planning to ban American citizens from traveling to North Korea, tourism companies say. Earlier this week, Korean People's Army soldiers walked past portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il-Sung (left) and Kim Jong-Il at the Korean Revolutionary Museum in Pyongyang. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

State Department Confirms Plan To Ban U.S. Citizens From Visiting North Korea

The new policy will reportedly include the threat of canceling the passports of Americans who violate the travel ban.

An undated photo shows peach pickers being driven to the orchards in Muscella, Ga. Black labor was essential for the success of the peach crop, even if African-Americans were rarely credited for the importance of their work. Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress hide caption

toggle caption
Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress

The Salt

The Un-Pretty History Of Georgia's Iconic Peach

The state isn't the biggest producer of the pink-orange fruit. So why are Georgia peaches so iconic? The answer has a lot to do with slavery — its end and a need for the South to rebrand itself.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is mobbed by young supporters after addressing an anti-austerity rally in Parliament Square, London, following a march through the city on July 1. Victoria Jones - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Victoria Jones - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images

Parallels - World News

Once Seen As Too Left-Wing, Will Jeremy Corbyn Be U.K.'s Next Prime Minister?

The Labour Party leader is 68 and riding a wave of support from young voters. "He's like the Bernie Sanders of the U.K., but with a very refined accent," says a staffer who once worked for Sanders.

Once Seen As Too Left-Wing, Will Jeremy Corbyn Be U.K.'s Next Prime Minister?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536861005/538472772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dawn Sahr (left) and Asma Jama met for the first time at StoryCorps. In October 2015, Sahr's sister physically attacked Jama at a restaurant in Minnesota. Afterward, Sahr reached out to Jama to make sure she was OK and to offer her support. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of StoryCorps

StoryCorps

When A Somali-American Woman Was Attacked, Support Came From An Unlikely Source

Asma Jama was struck in the face with a glass mug after speaking Swahili in a restaurant in Minnesota. After the trial ended and the attacker pleaded guilty, the attacker's sister reached out to Jama.

When A Somali-American Woman Was Attacked, Support Came From An Unlikely Source

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538295334/538472778" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Designer Kenneth Jay Lane attends the 2010 kick-off dinner for Lighthouse International's POSH Fashion sale at the Oak Room in New York City. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Costume Jewelry Designer Kenneth Jay Lane Dies At 85

Lane designed costume jewelry for Hollywood stars, Jackie Kennedy Onassis and viewers of TV's shopping channel QVC. Many women wore his fakes, or "faque," as he pronounced it, with their real gems.