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Crews worked to remove the statue of Supreme Court judge and segregationist Roger Taney from the front lawn of the Maryland State House late Thursday night. Taney wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision that defended slavery and said black Americans could never be citizens. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Confederate Statues Were Built To Further A 'White Supremacist Future'

President Trump hasn't mentioned it as he's defended the memorabilia over the past week, but historians say the statues were originally built to send a clear message to black Americans.

Code Switch is tackling your trickiest questions about race relations. amathers/iStock hide caption

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amathers/iStock

How To Talk Race With Your Family: Ask Code Switch

We asked you to send us your racial conundrums. And in the first 'Ask Code Switch,' we take on a big one: How do you talk to family members whose racial views seem stuck in the Stone Age?

How To Talk Race With Your Family: Ask Code Switch

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Abraham Lincoln warned that "A house divided against itself cannot stand." Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Racial Issues Have Often Been A Test for U.S. Presidents With Conflicted Feelings

President Eisenhower was not a fan of the 1954 Supreme Court order against segregated schools; but he sent the 101st Airborne Division to Little Rock, Ark., to ensure it was enforced at Central High.

Racial Issues Have Often Been A Test for U.S. Presidents With Conflicted Feelings

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Dick Gregory, known for his sharp commentary on race relations during the 1960s civil rights movement, was considered a pioneer in using satire to address social issues. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Comedian And Civil Rights Activist Dick Gregory Dies At 84

Gregory was known for his sharp satire, political activism and health advocacy. He went on multiple hunger strikes to protest issues like the Vietnam War and police brutality.

In the upper reaches of the northern state of Uttarakhand, small villages are rain- and snow-fed. As snowfall has declined, farmers are starting to plant crops in winter, when fields would usually lie fallow. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

As India's Climate Changes, Farmers In The North Experiment With New Crops

Farmers are starting to grow new crops in winter, when their fields usually lie fallow. Meanwhile, air pollution, which contributes to climate change, is weakening India's solar energy production.

As India's Climate Changes, Farmers In The North Experiment With New Crops

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Counterprotesters assemble at the Statehouse before a planned "Free Speech" rally by conservative organizers begins on the adjacent Boston Common, on Saturday. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Boston Right-Wing 'Free Speech' Rally Dwarfed By Counterprotesters

Thousands of counterprotesters gathered in Boston Common to meet the rally participants, who said they have no connection to those who perpetrated violence in Charlottesville, Va., last week.

In this July 10, 1945, photo provided by U.S. Navy media content operations, USS Indianapolis (CA 35) is shown off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, 20 days before she was sunk by Japanese torpedoes. AP hide caption

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AP

Wreckage Of USS Indianapolis, Sunk By Japanese In WWII, Found In Pacific

The cruiser was returning from a secret mission to deliver atomic bomb components when she was sunk by a Japanese submarine. The ensuing loss of life is the large in the history of the U.S. Navy.

Vanessa Wauchope begins abdominal exercises in Leah Keller's class in San Francisco, Calif. Keller teaches an exercise, called "drawing in," to help strengthen abdominal muscles that tend to spread apart a bit during pregnancy. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

Getting To The Core Of Exercises Said To Strengthen 'Mum Tum'

NPR listeners had lots of questions after our story about diastasis recti, a medical condition of abdominal muscles that's common among new moms. Many wanted to know more about how to fix the problem.

President Trump speaks on the phone Jan. 28 with Russia's Putin, flanked by top aides, from left, Reince Priebus, Vice President Pence, Steve Bannon, Sean Spicer and Michael Flynn. Only Pence remains. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What Trump's Increasing Isolation Could Mean For His Presidency

The president has completed a full purge of top White House aides instrumental in his election. Their ouster could be a big gamble, as Trump finds himself with fewer and fewer allies.

While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this. Sally Elford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Elford/Getty Images

After Charlottesville, A Doctor Reflects On Hateful Patients And His Own Biases

Public Radio Tulsa

Medical professionals take pride in their commitment to care for all patients. But that pride doesn't shield them from the difficult ones.

An English couple on vacation in Greece composed this note, rolled it up in a bottle and, on July 4, tossed it into the Mediterranean Sea. A Palestinian fisherman caught it in his net this week. He says it's the first piece of mail he has ever received. Photo Courtesy of Wael Al Soltan hide caption

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Photo Courtesy of Wael Al Soltan

From Greece, A Message In A Bottle Reaches Isolated Gaza

Vacationers from England tossed the bottle into the Mediterranean. It floated nearly 500 miles and into the net of a Palestinian fisherman. He said it was the first piece of mail he had ever received.

Suat Keceli, left, a retired stockroom worker, and his barber Yasar Ayhan pose in Ayhan's barber shop in Kasimpasa, the Istanbul neighborhood where President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan grew up. Keceli is a conservative Muslim who kept his daughter out of school when headscarves were banned in the classroom. Gokce Saracoglu/NPR hide caption

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Gokce Saracoglu/NPR

In Turkey, Schools Will Stop Teaching Evolution This Fall

When Turkish children head back to school, something will be missing from their textbooks: any mention of evolution. The government is phasing in what it calls a values-based curriculum.

Protesters shout anti-Nazi chants after chasing alt-right blogger Jason Kessler from a news conference on Aug. 13 in Charlottesville. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Explaining, Again, The Nazis' True Evil

NPR's Scott Simon tackles the painful legacy of the Nazi party and the enduring symbols of hatred used throughout history's atrocities against humanity, recently on display in Charlottesville.

Explaining, Again, The Nazis' True Evil

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Congressmen Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., Kevin Brady of Texas, Peter Roskam, R-Ill. and Dave Schweikert R-Ariz., stand outside Rancho del Cielo in California, where they were crafting a tax overhaul. Susan Davis/NPR hide caption

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Susan Davis/NPR

Republicans Plead With Trump To Get On, And Stay On, Message To Pass A Tax Overhaul

While the president was laying blame on "both sides" for violence in Charlottesville, Republicans were meeting to hammer out a tax overhaul. But they worry about whether Trump can make the sale.

NPR national desk reporter Kirk Siegler's family lived and worked on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota in the 1970s before settling permanently in Montana. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

A Return To The Rosebud Reservation Finds Tough Times Have Gotten Tougher

NPR's Kirk Siegler travels back to the Rosebud Indian Reservation in rural South Dakota, where his parents worked when he was born.

A Return To The Rosebud Reservation Finds Tough Times Have Gotten Tougher

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