Rev. Willis Johnson (left), pastor of Wellspring Church in Ferguson, speaks to Rev. Michele Shumake-Keller after the panel discussion. Johnson said he hoped the event would be a step to healing a "community in trauma." Whitney Curtis for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Whitney Curtis for NPR

Code Switch

Plea To Ferguson's Leaders: To Help Heal, Acknowledge Our Hurt

NPR's Michel Martin was invited by St. Louis Public Radio to moderate an intensely emotional community conversation around race, police tactics and leadership.

This image, posted on a militant website, shows an Islamic State fighter waving a flag from a captured government fighter jet in Raqqa, Syria. The group is well-funded and has gained territory over the last few months; that's raised some concerns in America, although experts say the organization is largely focused on regional goals. AP hide caption

itoggle caption AP

Parallels - World News

For Islamic State, Hitting The U.S. May Not Be A Top Priority

Experts say the well-funded militant group is focused on gaining power in the Middle East, not attacking America. The bigger risk is of an opportunistic attack, locally or in Europe.

A Malaysia Airlines crew-member inspects an airplane at Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) on Thursday. The carrier announced it was laying off a third of its workforce amid steep financial losses. Azhar Rahim/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Azhar Rahim/EPA/Landov

The Two-Way - News Blog

Malaysia Airlines Cuts A Third Of Its Workforce After Steep Losses

The disappearance of MH370 and the shooting-down of MH17 in recent months have compounded the hit to the carrier's already shaky bottom line.

David Gilkey, Nurith C. Aizenman, Nicole Beemsterboer/NPR

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Goats and Soda

They Are The Body Collectors: A Perilous Job In The Time Of Ebola

The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could cause infection. They wear safety garb. And they pray.

Alton Yates says the trip on the high speed sled could be painful, and frightening. But he also says, "We were anxious to get strapped into that seat to conduct the next experiment." Courtesy of Alton Yates hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Alton Yates

StoryCorps

A Teen In The 1950s, Extreme Sledding For The Air Force

Fresh out of school, Alton Yates needed to make money, so he signed up for the Air Force. His job? Riding rocket-propelled sleds, to help test whether high-speed space travel would be safe for humans.

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