Latest Newscast

Trucks line up to cross to the United States near the Otay Commercial port of entry on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border on Jan. 25. Trump now says he will renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he has long criticized, rather than scrap it. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

Politics

With Billions At Stake, Trump Agrees To Mend NAFTA — Not End It

Despite his long-standing criticism of the North American Free Trade Agreement, President Trump has opted to reopen negotiations on the deal rather than run the risk of scrapping it altogether.

President Trump weighed back in on Twitter, apparently trying to switch subjects, from the troubles of his former national security adviser to raising the possibility of a government shutdown. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Politics

Trump's Tweet-And-Switch On Shutdown And Flynn

The president went on a tweetstorm Thursday blaming Democrats for a possible shutdown, even though one's unlikely. Why? Democrats happened to be plastered on cable news talking about Michael Flynn.

People gather in the Pico-Union neighborhood of Los Angeles during rioting following the acquittal of four police officers in the beating of Rodney King in 1992. The neighborhood looks similar today as it did 25 years ago. It's still more than 80 percent Latino, with lots of immigrant families from Mexico and Central America. Gary Leonard/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Leonard/Corbis via Getty Images

Code Switch

As Los Angeles Burned, The Border Patrol Swooped In

People often remember the LA riots in terms of tensions between African-Americans, white police officers and Korean business owners. That story gets more complicated when you step into a predominantly Latino neighborhood.

As Los Angeles Burned, The Border Patrol Swooped In

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525619864/525943470" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Captain Janine Garner on her second deployment in 2007 refueling the Al Asad air base in Iraq Maj. Janine Garner hide caption

toggle caption
Maj. Janine Garner

National Security

Female Marines Tackle What They Call A Corps' 'Culture Of Sexism'

Maj. Janine Garner's photo was swept into the online group in which users, including some fellow troops, graded or demeaned military women. Now she is joining with other Marines to return fire.

Female Marines Tackle What They Call A Corps' 'Culture of Sexism'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525609522/525610279" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Trump speaks after signing the NASA Transition Authorization Act in the Oval Office on March 21, one of 28 bills that Trump has signed into law. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Politics

White House Touts 'Historic' 28 Laws Signed By Trump, But What Are They?

Although the number is relatively large, the substance of the measures tells a different story.

White House Touts 'Historic' 28 Laws Signed By Trump, But What Are They?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525753448/525797683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Actresses Logan Browning (left) and Ashley Blaine Featherson appear in a scene from the Netflix show Dear White People. Adam Rose/Netflix hide caption

toggle caption
Adam Rose/Netflix

Code Switch

This Time, 'Dear White People' Is Not So Much About Them

The new Netflix series, with its incessant and incisive look at race at a fictional Ivy League college, doesn't really focus much on white people at all.

This Time, 'Dear White People' Is Not So Much About Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525897854/525919409" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

As Trump And Congress Flip-Flop On Health Care, Insurers Try To Plan Ahead

Insurance companies face deadlines to offer Affordable Care Act plans for next year, but lawmakers and the White House have left key decisions up in the air.

As Trump And Congress Flip-Flop On Health Care, Insurers Try To Plan Ahead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525754974/525918345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The avocados on the right are Hass, America's favorite variety of the green fruit. At left are GEM avocados, the great-granddaughter of the Hass. GEM avocados grow well in California's Central Valley and, in taste tests, they scored better than the Hass in terms of eating quality. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

The Salt

California Is On Its Way To Having An Avocado Crop Year-Round

Americans ate 2 billion pounds of avocados last year; many came from Mexico. That's because avocados grow year-round in Mexico's climate, but not California's. Researchers are working to change that.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, seen here outside the West Wing of the White House on Nov. 10, has a new memoir, Two Paths: America Divided or United. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Politics

Ohio Gov. John Kasich On America's Division And Rising Above 'Self-Absorption'

Kasich describes his presidential run and the state of political discourse in his memoir, Two Paths: America Divided or United. "We all need to live a life a little bigger than ourselves," he says.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich On America's Division And Rising Above 'Self-Absorption'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525675161/525675162" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Google launched its first servers in Cuba this week. Above, people use public Wi-Fi to connect their devices on a Havana street in October 2016. Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Google Spins Up Its First Servers In Cuba

The company can speed up delivery of high-bandwidth content like YouTube videos because the servers will now store data locally. But accessing the Internet in Cuba remains difficult and expensive.

Sylvan Esso's second album, What Now, comes out April 28. Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

Music Interviews

Sylvan Esso On The Pressure To Make Magic — Again

Once Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn became famous as Sylvan Esso, they immediately felt the burdens of replicating their success. Three years after their electro-pop debut, they're back with What Now.

Sylvan Esso On The Pressure To Make Magic — Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/525864867/525918351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript