Yellowtail jack (Seriola lalandi) at HSWRI in San Diego. Courtesy of HSWRI hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of HSWRI

The Salt

Huge Fish Farm Planned Near San Diego Aims To Fix Seafood Imbalance

The aquaculture project would be the same size as New York's Central Park and produce 11 million pounds of yellowtail and sea bass each year. But some people see it as an aquatic "factory farm."

Listen Loading… 3:54
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/436414230/436673778" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

From member station

Hereford, Texas, may have lovely vistas, but it's notably short of mental health care options. Kirk Kittell/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Kirk Kittell/Flickr

Shots - Health News

Texas Strives To Lure Mental Health Providers To Rural Counties

About 3 million people in Texas don't have a mental health provider in their county. A new loan repayment program may not be enough to lure them to the state's rural areas.

Listen Loading… 3:56
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/436386850/436673754" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

From member station

Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Code Switch

How Startups Are Using Tech To Mitigate Workplace Bias

The idea that everyone makes automatic, subconscious associations about people is not new. But now some companies are trying to reduce the impact of such biases in the workplace.

Listen Loading… 4:48
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/434896292/436673772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

An International Atomic Energy Agency inspector cuts a uranium enrichment connection at Iran's Natanz facility, 200 miles south of Tehran, in 2014. The U.S. Congress is expected to address the Iranian nuclear deal this month. One unresolved issue: How much work might Iran have done previously on weaponizing its program? Kazem Ghane/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Kazem Ghane/AP

Parallels - World News

An Unanswered Question About Iran's Nuclear Program

Congress plans to address the Iranian nuclear deal this month. One unresolved issue: How much work might Iran have done previously on weaponizing its program?

Listen Loading… 4:19
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/436593083/436673760" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">

Already culturally superstitious, 17th century lower classes were quick to adopt tea leaves instead of some of their cumbersome and often dangerous methods of divination, such as the use of molten metal, hot wax or the entrails of animals. Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Corbis

The Salt

For Centuries, People Have Searched For Answers In The Bottom Of A Tea Cup

The practice of reading tea leaves had its heyday during Victorian times, when fascination with the occult and self-analysis thrived. It was safer than other forms of divination, and persists today.

Fiorina's strong showing at the August Fox News debate helped boost her in the polls, meaning she could now make it into the main CNN debate. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

It's All Politics

CNN Just Found A Way To Get Carly Fiorina Onto The Debate Stage

The former Hewlett-Packard CEO has been fighting CNN's September debate criteria after making gains in GOP presidential primary polls in recent weeks.

Prominent antiquities scholar Khaled al-Asaad speaks in Syria in this undated photo. He was later killed by the terror group ISIS for protecting Syria's ancient artifacts. AP hide caption

itoggle caption AP

13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Science, Knowledge And Darkness

Knowledge gained from science, in its most democratically practiced forms, will always be threatening to someone. We must be stalwart in our determination to pass the light forward, says Adam Frank.

Classical guitarist Berta Rojas' new album, History of Tango, charts a new course for the popular style. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the artist

Music Interviews

Berta Rojas Proves The Classical Guitar Can 'Sing A Tango'

The accomplished guitarist's new album, History of Tango, takes on a popular Latin-American style not often associated with her instrument.

Listen Loading… 8:01
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/436610596/436673784" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
load more
Back to top