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Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort talks to reporters at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last July, weeks before his resignation. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Politics

Former Trump Campaign Manager Registers As A Foreign Agent

Paul Manafort's firm took in more than $17 million working for Ukraine's Party of Regions, which is widely considered to have had strong ties to the Kremlin.

Former Trump Campaign Manager Paul Manafort Registers As A Foreign Agent

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Staff at the Secretary of State's Office inspect the damage to the new Ten Commandments monument outside the state Capitol in Little Rock, Ark., on Wednesday morning. Police say a car crashed into it less than 24 hours after it was installed. Jill Zeman Bleed/AP hide caption

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Jill Zeman Bleed/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Arkansas' Ten Commandments Monument Lasted Less Than 24 Hours

Police say a man drove a 2016 Dodge Dart into the 6,000-pound granite slab less than a day after it was installed on the grounds of the state Capitol. The man reportedly took video as he accelerated.

Billy Crook's commercial crabbing boat, Pilot's Bride. He says it's looking like it's going to be a good year for crabbing on the Chesapeake Bay. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Environment

Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Are Fading, But Proposed EPA Cuts Threaten Success

After years of failed attempts at cleaning up the dead zones, the Chesapeake Bay, once a national disgrace, is teeming with wildlife again. But success is fragile, and it might be even more so now.

Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Are Fading, But Proposed EPA Cuts Threaten Success

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Vatican finance chief Cardinal George Pell of Australia has been charged by police in the state of Victoria with sexual assault. Vincenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vincenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Australian Police Bring Sexual Assault Charges Against Catholic Cardinal

Cardinal George Pell, a key adviser to Pope Francis, has been ordered to appear in a Melbourne court next month. The Archdiocese of Sydney says he will return from Rome to fight the charges.

Less than half of the 22 million veterans in the U.S. get their health care through the Veterans Affairs system. Many rely on Medicaid, which is slated for reductions under the health plan making its way through the U.S. Senate. bwilking/Getty Images hide caption

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bwilking/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

Veterans Helped By Affordable Care Act Worry About Republican Repeal Efforts

The uninsurance rate among veterans dropped dramatically after the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, rolled out. Those who rely on Medicaid say they are particularly concerned about losing that care.

Veterans Helped By Obamacare Worry About Republican Repeal Efforts

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Boaty McBoatface undergoes preparations last year in Birkenhead, England. By the assessment of the British Antarctic Survey, Boaty discharged its duties on its inaugural voyage surpassingly well. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Boaty McBoatface Makes Its Triumphant Return, Hauling 'Unprecedented Data'

The curiously named submersible wrapped up its inaugural voyage last week. And, as the British Antarctic Survey noted Wednesday, Boaty acquitted itself well on the seven-week expedition.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-K.Y. (left), and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, speak to members of the media outside the West Wing of the White House on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Politics

Just 17 Percent Of Americans Approve Of Republican Senate Health Care Bill

In a new NPR-PBS NewsHour-Marist poll, 55 percent of Americans say they disapprove of the Senate GOP bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

USA Gymnastics announced Tuesday it will adopt new policies to better protect its athletes from abuse. Steve Penny, the organization's former president and CEO, is seen here in 2011. Bob Levey/Getty Images for Hilton hide caption

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Bob Levey/Getty Images for Hilton

The Two-Way - News Blog

After Abuse Scandal, USA Gymnastics Says It Will Take Steps To Protect Athletes

The organization's board unanimously adopted 70 recommendations of an independent report. But some say the governing body's pledge to do better isn't enough.

A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

An analysis examining mortality among millions of Americans finds that a tiny decrease in levels of soot could save about 12,000 lives each year.

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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An official at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility demonstrates how a curtain is pulled between the death chamber and witness room in 2005 at the prison in Lucasville, Ohio. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Federal Appeals Court Paves Way For Ohio To Resume Lethal Injections

It was a contentious decision that split the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges in an 8-6 vote. A lower court had halted executions. The judges focused on the effects of the sedative midazolam.