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Cardinal Denies Sexual Assault Charges; Travel Ban Details

Cardinal George Pell has been ordered to appear in an Australian court next month to face sexual assault charges. The Trump administration on Thursday will outline how the travel ban will work.

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

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Sen. Shelly Moore Capito, R-W.Va., accompanied by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., right, and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in March 2015. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Molly Riley/AP

Politics

GOP Senators From Opioid-Ravaged States Uneasy About Health Care Bill

This week, Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., announced she opposes the health care bill in its current form. She cited cuts to Medicaid and what the bill would mean for people with opioid addiction.

GOP Senators From Opioid-Ravaged States Uneasy About Health Care Bill

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U.S. and South Korean soldiers of the combined 2nd Infantry Division train at Camp Red Cloud in Uijeongbu, South Korea, in 2015. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Parallels - World News

In Trump Meeting With South Korean Leader, A Chance To Reaffirm 'Ironclad' Ties

North Korea will top the agenda as President Trump and South Korea's Moon Jae-in meet Thursday. But whatever tensions brew below the surface, there will be reassurances that the relationship is solid.

In Trump Meeting With South Korean Leader, A Chance To Reaffirm 'Ironclad' Ties

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Vatican finance chief Cardinal George Pell of Australia has been charged by police in the state of Victoria with sexual assault. Vincenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vincenzo Pinto/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Australian Police Bring Sexual Assault Charges Against Catholic Cardinal

Cardinal George Pell, a key adviser to Pope Francis, has been ordered to appear in a Melbourne court next month. He denied the charges and says he'll take a leave of absence to "clear my name."

Bartender Robin Miller mixes a round of mezcal margaritas at Espita Mezcaleria in Washington, D.C. As U.S. drinkers embrace mezcal, investors are flocking south to the heart of Mexico's mezcal country, and local incomes are rising. Kevin Leahy/NPR hide caption

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Kevin Leahy/NPR

The Salt

America's Growing Taste For Mezcal Is Good For Mexico's Small Producers

KJZZ

Oaxaca is the heart of mezcal country, where the pungent booze is made from the same plant as tequila by traditional distillers. As U.S. drinkers embrace mezcal, investors are flocking south.

America's Growing Taste For Mezcal Is Good For Mexico's Small Producers

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Iraqi government forces flash a victory sign while holding an upside-down Islamic State flag in western Mosul on June 9. As ISIS loses territory, it's still exhorting its supporters to keep fighting. Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images

Parallels - World News

As ISIS Gets Squeezed In Syria And Iraq, It's Using Music As A Weapon

The Islamic State is losing territory in Iraq and Syria but is trying to keep its supporters' spirits up through song. Its newest release, "My State Remains," reveals an organization down but not out.

As ISIS Gets Squeezed In Syria And Iraq, It's Using Music As A Weapon

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Book Reviews

'I Want The Pages To Turn': Librarian Nancy Pearl's Summer Reading List

Ahead of the July 4th weekend, the Seattle-based librarian shares a stack of eight recent favorites. She includes thrillers, mysteries, family sagas and an homage to the game rock, paper, scissors.

'I Want The Pages To Turn': Librarian Nancy Pearl's Summer Reading List

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Demonstrators in Rome protest June 11 against imposition of vaccine requirements. A new law requires childhood vaccination against 12 diseases. Marco Ravagli/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Ravagli/Barcroft Images/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Parallels - World News

Amid Measles Outbreak, Italy Makes Childhood Vaccinations Mandatory

A tough new law means parents who don't vaccinate their children against a dozen diseases will face steep fines — and even risk losing custody. Italy has recorded 2,500-plus measles cases this year.

Amid Measles Outbreak, Italy Makes Childhood Vaccinations Mandatory

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Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort talks to reporters at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last July, weeks before his resignation. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Politics

Former Trump Campaign Manager Registers As A Foreign Agent

Paul Manafort's firm took in more than $17 million working for Ukraine's Party of Regions, which is widely considered to have had strong ties to the Kremlin.

Former Trump Campaign Manager Paul Manafort Registers As A Foreign Agent

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Billy Crook's commercial crabbing boat, Pilot's Bride. He says it's looking like it's going to be a good year for crabbing on the Chesapeake Bay. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

Environment

Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Are Fading, But Proposed EPA Cuts Threaten Success

After years of failed attempts at cleaning up the dead zones, the Chesapeake Bay, once a national disgrace, is teeming with wildlife again. But success is fragile, and it might be even more so now.

Chesapeake Bay Dead Zones Are Fading, But Proposed EPA Cuts Threaten Success

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Boaty McBoatface undergoes preparations last year in Birkenhead, England. By the assessment of the British Antarctic Survey, Boaty discharged its duties on its inaugural voyage surpassingly well. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Boaty McBoatface Makes Its Triumphant Return, Hauling 'Unprecedented Data'

The curiously named submersible wrapped up its inaugural voyage last week. And, as the British Antarctic Survey noted Wednesday, Boaty acquitted itself well on the seven-week expedition.

USA Gymnastics announced Tuesday it will adopt new policies to better protect its athletes from abuse. Steve Penny, the organization's former president and CEO, is seen here in 2011. Bob Levey/Getty Images for Hilton hide caption

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Bob Levey/Getty Images for Hilton

The Two-Way - News Blog

After Abuse Scandal, USA Gymnastics Says It Will Take Steps To Protect Athletes

The organization's board unanimously adopted 70 recommendations of an independent report. But some say the governing body's pledge to do better isn't enough.

A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

An analysis examining mortality among millions of Americans finds that a tiny decrease in levels of soot could save about 12,000 lives each year.

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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An official at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility demonstrates how a curtain is pulled between the death chamber and witness room in 2005 at the prison in Lucasville, Ohio. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Federal Appeals Court Paves Way For Ohio To Resume Lethal Injections

It was a contentious decision that split the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges in an 8-6 vote. A lower court had halted executions. The judges focused on the effects of the sedative midazolam.