Researcher John Clements in the early 1980s, after he figured out that lungs need surfactants to breathe. David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF hide caption

itoggle caption David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF

Shots - Health News

How A Scientist's Slick Discovery Helped Save Preemies' Lives

In the 1950s, John Clements discovered a slippery lung substance key to breathing — and to the survival of tiny babies. His insight transformed medicine.

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Buddy Guy's latest album is titled Born to Play Guitar. Josh Cheuse/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Josh Cheuse/Courtesy of the artist

Music Interviews

Buddy Guy: 'I Worry About The Future Of Blues Music'

Buddy Guy is the blues, and he's our connection to a genre that's embedded in the history of America. But it's a sound the guitarist fears is fading.

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Newly elected mayor Martin O'Malley, left, waves to supporters in Baltimore in November 1999. Gail Burton/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gail Burton/AP

It's All Politics

Baltimore Launched Martin O'Malley, Then Weighed Him Down

The city was a political launchpad for the presidential candidate, but his "zero tolerance" policing has drawn criticism for affecting the community's relationship with law enforcement.

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Olive oil gets filtered in an oil mill in a Portuguese oil farm near Evora. Rick Mattes says that if an olive oil's concentration of fatty acid rises above 3.3 percent, it's no longer considered edible. And it'll be brimming with oleogustus. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Francisco Seco/AP

The Salt

Scientists Discover A 6th Taste, And It's Quite A Disgusting Mouthful

They call it "oleogustus," or the taste for fat. But nutrition scientist Rick Mattes says it's far from delicious. Found in rancid food, it's often an unpleasant warning.

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