The U.S. Supreme Court gave a reprieve to Texas clinics that provide abortion services. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

Supreme Court Reprieve Lets 10 Texas Abortion Clinics Stay Open For Now KUHF

The clinics can stay open while lawyers ask the court for a full review of the law. If they had closed, some women would have faced round trips of 300 miles or more to get an abortion.

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Siri's answer to the brain-teaser question "What's zero divided by zero" generates a response that people find both funny and unnerving. NPR hide caption

itoggle caption NPR

The Two-Way - News Blog

Asked To Divide Zero By Zero, Siri Waxes Philosophical (And Personal)

Siri's elaborate reply easily surpasses the simple "Does not compute" with which robots in old sci-fi movies used to announce a bout of cognitive dissonance.

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NPR's Frank Langfitt has been offering free taxi rides around Shanghai to talk to ordinary Chinese. He drives a Camry around the city, but rented a van for a trip 500 miles outside the city earlier this year. He recently decided to buy a car, which can be a complicated process in China. Yang Zhuo for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Yang Zhuo for NPR

Parallels - World News

Would You Buy A Used Car From A Man Named Beer Horse?

NPR's Frank Langfitt has been giving free taxi rides around Shanghai to learn about the lives of ordinary Chinese. He's decided to stop renting a car and buy one. That's when he met Beer Horse.

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Filmmaker Christopher Lee attends a 1999 film festival. Courtesy of Elizabeth Sheldon hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Elizabeth Sheldon

Code Switch

Overriding Anatomy: Calif. Law Considers Gender Identity After Death KQED

When Christopher Lee died in 2012, his friends told the coroner that he was transgender. His death certificate nevertheless listed him as female. "It felt like spitting on his grave," one friend remembers. So she set out to change the law.

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Saudi actor Nasser al-Qasabi, left, appears in a scene from his TV show Selfie, which satirizes ISIS. He's received death threats in reaction to the series, which airs on a Saudi-owned channel. Via MBC hide caption

itoggle caption Via MBC

Parallels - World News

In Saudi Arabia, An Uphill Fight To Out-Shout The Extremists

Can satire and commentary win out against ISIS? Some Saudi journalists and comedians are risking their lives to mock and question their country's religious extremists.

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President Obama walks with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff during a visit to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on Monday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Evan Vucci/AP

Latin America

Brazil Tries To Rebuild Relations With U.S. After NSA Spying Scandal

Two years ago, President Dilma Rousseff canceled a planned state visit after discovering the U.S. was spying on Brazil. Since that time, her popularity has nosedived and so too has Brazil's economy.

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Bite into that bread before your main meal, and you'll spike your blood sugar and amp up your appetite. Waiting until the end of your dinner to nosh on bread can blunt those effects. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

The Salt

Curb Your Appetite: Save Bread For The End Of The Meal

A hot bread basket is a tasty way to start off dinner. But all those carbs before the main fare can amp up appetite and spike blood sugar. Saving the carbs for the end of the meal can help avert that.

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Supporters of same-sex marriages gather outside the Supreme Court on April 28. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

U.S.

The Economic Reality Of The Same-Sex Marriage Ruling WSHU

From less-complicated tax filing to reduced uncertainty over medical decisions, the Supreme Court's ruling will have a wide impact on same-sex households. It will also affect corporate policies.

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With his catchy songwriting and rock-star stage presence, BØRNS grabbed WNKU's attention. Nick Walker/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Nick Walker/Courtesy of the artist

Heavy Rotation

10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Hear a summery selection of tracks that some of our favorite public-radio hosts loved this month, including music from BØRNS, Django Django and Somi.

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The gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Okla. On Monday the Supreme Court voted 5-4 in a case from Oklahoma that the sedative midazolam can be used in executions without violating the prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Sue Ogrocki/AP

Law

Supreme Court Concludes Term With Death Penalty Ruling, Looks Ahead

The court wrapped up on Monday, supporting the use of a controversial drug in executions by lethal injection. The justices also set up cases to be heard next term on affirmative action and abortion.

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