The Crystal Serenity, pictured here in Seward, Alaska, is the largest cruise ship to traverse the Northwest Passage, traveling from Alaska to New York City. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio hide caption

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Environment

In Warmer Climate, A Luxury Cruise Sets Sail Through Northwest Passage

Alaska Public Media

Climate change is opening up the Arctic to luxury cruises, including an Alaska-to-New York voyage. The vacation destination takes advantage of warming oceans but raises safety and ethical concerns.

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Shots - Health News

A New Course At Arkansas Colleges: How To Not Get Pregnant

Arkansas, a Bible Belt state that emphasizes abstinence only in high school, is launching a mandatory program in its colleges and universities on strategies to prevent unplanned pregnancy.

A New Course At Arkansas Colleges: How To Not Get Pregnant

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U.S.

'Mystery Shoppers' Help U.S. Regulators Fight Racial Discrimination At Banks

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is sending undercover operatives to ferret out racial discrimination. They're called "testers" or "mystery shoppers" and pose as customers applying for loans.

'Mystery Shoppers' Help U.S. Regulators Fight Racial Discrimination At Banks

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Hilton Pray, 82, holds one of thousands of his photographs that were damaged after an estimated 4-feet of water filled his home in Denham Springs, La. Collin Richie/Humans of the Water hide caption

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Photography

After Louisiana Floods, A Photographer Finds Resilience

Photographer Collin Richie and three colleagues have been shooting portraits of people who were impacted by the floods in Louisiana. The images focus on what people were able to save.

After Louisiana Floods, A Photographer Finds Resilience

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Rough seas prevented the NOAA's Okeanos Explorer from collecting data in the the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in February. NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Protected Marine Area Near Hawaii Is Now Twice The Size Of Texas

The Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument was created by President George W. Bush. Now President Obama is quadrupling it in size — making it the biggest marine reserve in the world.

Gov. Paul LePage holds a town hall meeting at Biddeford High School on April 19. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

LISTEN: Maine's Governor Unleashes Obscenities On Lawmaker Who Criticized Him

Maine Rep. Drew Gattine said it was unhelpful when Gov. Paul LePage made "racially charged" statements. In response, LePage told Gattine, "I am after you" — along with much more vulgar remarks.

Breitbart's Milo Yiannopoulos, a self-proclaimed leader of the movement, co-wrote a manifesto of sorts about what the alt-right believes. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Politics

What You Need To Know About The Alt-Right Movement

Hillary Clinton blasted Donald Trump for aligning with the "alt-right." But what exactly is the movement?

What You Need To Know About The Alt-Right Movement

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Activists rally to call for the removal of Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky in San Francisco in June over his ruling in a sexual assault case. On Friday, the judge was transferred from criminal to civil court. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Judge In Stanford Sex Assault Case Is Transferring To Civil Court

Judge Aaron Persky's controversial six-month jail sentence for a former Stanford student convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman continues to cast a shadow over his deliberations.

Burkini bans in France have sparked international outrage. In London, people recently held a "Wear what you want beach party" outside France's embassy. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

France's High Court Suspends Riviera Town's Burkini Ban

France's Council of State said the town of Villeneuve-Loubet breached several "fundamental freedoms" by forbidding the swimwear on its beaches. Some 30 towns have instituted such bans this summer.

Ramen will buy anything from smuggled fruit to laundry services from fellow inmates, a study at one prison finds. It's not just that ramen is tasty: Prisoners say they're not getting enough food. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

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The Salt

Ramen Noodles Are Now The Prison Currency Of Choice

Ramen will buy anything from smuggled fruit to laundry services from fellow inmates, a study at one prison finds. It's not just that ramen is tasty: Prisoners say they're not getting enough food.

Hillary Clinton, seen on a T.V. camera monitor in 2013, has been criticized for not holding more press conferences. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Media

Has Hillary Clinton Actually Been Dodging The Press?

Clinton has been criticized for failing to give enough access to the press, but she says she's done more than 300 interviews. According to an NPR analysis, that's only part of the story.

Has Hillary Clinton Actually Been Dodging The Press?

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Smoke wafts over the highway linking the Bolivian capital of La Paz with the Chilean border during an ongoing clash between striking miners, who are blockading the road, and police. Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

In Bolivia, Striking Miners Kidnap And Kill High-Level Minister

The country's deputy interior minister was on his way to talk with the miners about their demands. Officials say he was seized Thursday and then beaten to death.

Tsukimi Ayano's scarecrows congregate at a bus stop in the Nagoro. The village used to be home to about 300 people but now there are 30. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Parallels - World News

A Dying Japanese Village Brought Back To Life — By Scarecrows

A remote mountain village once was home to hundreds. Now it has just 30 residents. Tskukimi Ayano, who at 67 is one of the younger ones, has repopulated the village with scarecrow-like figures.

A Dying Japanese Village Brought Back To Life — By Scarecrows

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Debris from flood-damaged homes lines Highway 167 in Maurice, La. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Around the Nation

Locals In Flooded Rural Areas Of Louisiana Say Aid Is Slow To Arrive

In Baton Rouge, the recovery is underway after historic floods devastated the southern part of the state. But aid is slower to reach more remote, rural areas that were also hit hard by the rains.

Locals In Flooded Rural Areas Of Louisiana Say Aid Is Slow To Arrive

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Lenny Zimmel puts Colby cheese curds into forms to make 40 pounds blocks of cheese at the Widmer's Cheese Cellars in Theresa, Wis. Record dairy production in the U.S. has produced a record surplus of cheese, causing prices to drop. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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The Salt

America's Real Mountain Of Cheese Is On Our Plates

To help dairy farmers hurt by a glut, the USDA said this week it'll buy $20 million worth of cheese and give it to food banks. But we eat so much of the stuff, that's hardly a drop in the bucket.

America's Real Mountain Of Cheese Is On Our Plates

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A project now under construction in Cleveland will eventually house the Case Western Reserve University's medical, dental and nursing schools, as well as the Cleveland Clinic's in-house medical school. Courtesy of Cleveland Clinic hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Teaching Medical Teamwork Right From The Start

Kaiser Health News

Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic are collaborating to better integrate the training of student doctors, dentists, nurses and social workers. One goal: Reduce medical errors.

Teaching Medical Teamwork Right From The Start

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Alabama's new cursive law is aimed at making sure that state's students know how to perform important life tasks, such as signing their name, says its sponsor, state Rep. Dickie Drake. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Education

Cursive Law Writes New Chapter For Handwriting In Alabama's Schools

Troy Public Radio

Schools in Alabama were already required to teach cursive writing, but a new law now requires schools to provide cursive instruction by the end of the third grade, and report proficiency levels.

Cursive Law Writes New Chapter For Handwriting In Alabama's Schools

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Floyd Norman was Disney's first African-American animator. He's shown above in 1956, working as an "apprentice inbetweener" on Sleeping Beauty. Michael Flore Films/Falco Ink. hide caption

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Movie Interviews

At 81, Disney's First African-American Animator Is Still In The Studio

First hired in the 1950s, Floyd Norman is still drawing. "Creative people don't hang it up," he says. "We don't walk away, we don't want to sit in a lawn chair. ... We want to continue to work. "

At 81, Disney's First African-American Animator Is Still In The Studio

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