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Charmayne Healy (l) and Miranda Kirk (r), co-founders of the Aaniiih Nakoda Anti-Drug Movement, have helped Melinda Healy, center, with their peer-support programs. Nora Saks/MTPR hide caption

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Nora Saks/MTPR

Shots - Health News

Two Sisters Try To Tackle Drug Use At A Montana Indian Reservation

Montana Public Radio

With a lack of treatment options at the Fort Belknap reservation, the pair has sparked a grassroots response to substance abuse by creating peer support groups — the only choice for many seeking help.

Lee So-yeon, a North Korean defector, used to be a signal corpsman in North Korea's army. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Parallels - World News

'I Was Shocked By Freedom': Defectors Reflect On Life In North Korea

Now in Seoul, North Korean defectors recall life inside one of the world's most secretive regimes, talking of brainwashing, required military service — and the jolt of seeing the outside world.

'I Was Shocked By Freedom': Defectors Reflect On Life In North Korea

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Sometime between grade school and grad school, the brain's information highways get remapped in a way that dramatically boosts self-control. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Shots - Health News

As Brains Mature, More Robust Information Networks Boost Self-Control

Sometime between grade school and grad school, the brain's information highways get remapped in a way that dramatically reins in impulsive behavior.

As Brains Mature, More Robust Information Networks Boost Self-Control

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Forty years after The Dallas Morning News ran a review for the original Star Wars calling Chewbacca a "wookie," the paper issued a correction noting that the spelling is actually wookiee. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

NPR News Nuggets

NPR News Nuggets: It's A Win For The Wookiees, Twitter's Power & Baby Bears

Here's a quick roundup of some of the mini-moments you may have missed on this week's Morning Edition.

DJ Itsuki Morita Sets Guinness Record

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Jaco Pastorius performs in 1982, around the time when Paul Blakemore engineered his concert at Avery Fisher Hall for NPR's Jazz Alive!. Tom Copi/Courtesy of Resonance Records hide caption

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Tom Copi/Courtesy of Resonance Records

Music Interviews

In A Lost Concert, Jaco Pastorius Sounded The Rhythm Of The City

In 1982, NPR's Jazz Alive! recorded a big-band performance led by the inventive bassist at New York's Avery Fisher Hall. Engineer Paul Blakemore has remastered the tapes for a new album.

In A Lost Concert, Jaco Pastorius Sounded The Rhythm Of The City

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Stefani McCoy, seated in the center of the front row, was a high school dropout. After going back to school and completing her college degree, she joined the Peace Corps and went to Namibia to help fellow dropouts. Courtesy of Stefani McCoy hide caption

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Courtesy of Stefani McCoy

Goats and Soda

Former High School Dropout Joins Peace Corps, Helps New Dropouts

Stefani McCoy had it with school when she was a teenager. She turned her life around — and now she's helping Namibia's dropouts do the same.

Dwayne Johnson, Ilfenesh Hadera and Kelly Rohrbach in the new guilty pleasure (until the story starts), Baywatch. Frank Masi/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Frank Masi/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Movie Reviews

Beaches, Bathing Suits, And Finally On The Big Screen, 'Baywatch'

NPR movie critic Bob Mondello reviews a movie that could only come out in the summer — Baywatch, starring Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron.

Beaches, Bathing Suits, And Finally On The Big Screen, 'Baywatch'

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Watermelon minaudière with rhinestones, 1991 Gary Mamay/Leiber Collection/Museum of Arts and Design hide caption

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Gary Mamay/Leiber Collection/Museum of Arts and Design

Art & Design

Art You Can Wear On Your Arm? For Judith Leiber, It's In The Bag

In her 40 years in the business, Leiber designed 3,500 handbags, some of which were carried by First Ladies and movie stars. Now 96, Leiber says she loves her bags, whether "classic" or "crazy."

Art You Can Wear On Your Arm? For Judith Leiber, It's In The Bag

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A tractor pulls a planter while distributing corn seed on a field in Malden, Ill. Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Salt

Two Scientists, Two Different Approaches To Saving Bees From Poison Dust

Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers.

Vincent Galvan first went to a nursing home in 2012 after his right leg was amputated. He was evicted after complaining about his care. Mariah Woelfel/WVIK hide caption

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Mariah Woelfel/WVIK

Shots - Health News

As Nursing Homes Evict Patients, States Question Motives

According to the federal government, the top complaint about nursing homes is wrongful eviction. Advocates say nursing homes want residents who pay more but require less care.

As Nursing Homes Evict Patients, States Question Motives

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