One of the hornless Holsteins at Steve Maddox's California dairy farm. Maddox is beginning to breed hornless cattle into his herd, but it's slow going. Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Abbie Fentress Swanson for NPR

The Salt

Wanted: More Bulls With No Horns

Most U.S. dairy cows are born with horns, but most farms remove them. Animal welfare groups say dehorning is cruel. Instead, they want ranchers to breed more hornless cattle into their herds.

Parents of children who are extremely finicky may find it useful to seek help, psychologists say, because some kids won't outgrow the behavior on their own. But don't make the table a battlefield. Chad Springer/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Chad Springer/Corbis

Shots - Health News

Could Your Child's Picky Eating Be A Sign Of Depression?

Most young children who are extra choosy about what they'll eat eventually outgrow the habit. But research finds that in extreme cases, the pickiness may be linked to depression or social anxiety.

Tiny Desk

SOAK: Tiny Desk Concert

Performing three songs from Before We Forgot How To Dream, Irish singer-songwriter Bridie Monds-Watson makes the most of a single voice and an acoustic guitar.

Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight. Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

The Salt

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

Foraging bumblebees can pick up nearly half their weight in pollen before heading home to the hive, research shows. All that weight tucked into hollows on their hind legs can complicate flying.

Sultan 'Ali 'Adil Shah II Slays a Tiger (ca. 1660) is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's critically acclaimed Sultans of Deccan India, 1500-1700 Opulence and Fantasy exhibition. The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent by Howard Hodgkin./Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art hide caption

itoggle caption The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent by Howard Hodgkin./Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Fine Art

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."

Babajide Bello of the tech company Andela takes a selfie with AOL's Steve Case after the pair played a pickup game of ping-pong. Courtesy of Andela hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Andela

Goats and Soda

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.

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Falling oil prices have put downward pressure on gasoline prices, now averaging $2.65 a gallon — about 85 cents cheaper than a year ago. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gene J. Puskar/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Oil Prices Tumble Again, Hurting Drillers But Helping Drivers

Oil prices are falling, down sharply since mid-June to just over $45 a barrel. That has affected gasoline prices, now down to an average of $2.65 a gallon, about 85 cents less than a year ago.

The sea snail Conus magus looks harmless enough, but it packs a venomous punch that lets it paralyze and eat fish. A peptide modeled on the venom is a powerful painkiller, though sneaking it past the blood-brain barrier has proved hard. Courtesy of Jeanette Johnson and Scott Johnson hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Jeanette Johnson and Scott Johnson

Shots - Health News

Snail Venom Yields Potent Painkiller, But Delivering The Drug Is Tricky

The drug derived from the venom of cone snails must be injected into the spinal column to get beyond a patient's blood-brain barrier and bring relief. But scientists think they may have a workaround.

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President Obama delivers remarks at a Clean Power Plan event at the White House on Monday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

President Obama Unveils New Power Plant Rules In 'Clean Power Plan'

The plan includes the first-ever national standards on carbon pollution from U.S. power plants. The president compared the reduction requirement — 32 percent below 2005 levels — to taking 166 million cars off the road.

Protesters rally on the steps of the Texas state capitol on July 28 to condemn the use of fetal tissue for medical research. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Gay/AP

Shots - Health News

Calls To Cut Off Planned Parenthood Are Nothing New KHN

Flashback to the 1980s, when President Ronald Reagan tried to restrict funding for Planned Parenthood. Efforts in Congress have continued since then — including legislation blocked by the Senate on Monday — with the latest focused on fetal tissue research.

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Grace Jerry performs her original single "E Go Happen" at a gathering of young African leaders at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home. The lyrics say: "Yes we can, sure we can change the world." YouTube hide caption

itoggle caption YouTube

Goats and Soda

Miss Wheelchair Nigeria Sings In Favor Of Access

Grace Alache Jerry advocates for Nigerians with disabilities. This week she introduced President Obama as he spoke to young African leaders, yet Jerry says she often feels excluded in her country.

Da Capo Press

Author Interviews

Reflecting On Football And Addiction As 'Friday Night Lights' Turns 25

A quarter-century ago, Buzz Bissinger wrote about the big-time stakes of small-town high school football in Friday Night Lights. Now he talks about the impact the book had on the players and himself.

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Pavement's new release, The Secret History, Vol. 1, comes out August 11. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the artist

First Listen

Preview Pavement's New Album, 'The Secret History, Vol. 1'

In the early 1990s, Pavement was especially rough around the edges. A new collection of unreleased recordings from the era captures the band's absurd charm.

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As part of its U.S. travels, hitchBOT rode along with two boys who were heading to summer camp. But a week later, the robot was found to have been vandalized. hitchBOT hide caption

itoggle caption hitchBOT

The Two-Way - News Blog

Group Offers To Help Revive HitchBOT That Was Vandalized In Philadelphia

The kid-sized robot was on a journey from Massachusetts to California when it was torn apart. A group of design and technology makers wants to make repairs so the robot can continue on its way.

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