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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested 680 people during the first week of February. The memos call for 10,000 more ICE officers and agents as well as 5,000 more agents at U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Bryan Cox/ICE via AP hide caption

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Bryan Cox/ICE via AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

What's New In Those DHS Memos On Immigration Enforcement?

The Department of Homeland Security released two memos Tuesday laying out the Trump administration's plans for detaining and deporting more people. The changes in policy could affect millions.

A group numbering in the hundreds gather to protest the appearance of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell R-Ky., and the policies of the Trump administration in Jeffersontown, Ky., on Wednesday. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Politics

With Protests, Both Obama And Trump White Houses Saw 'Manufactured' Anger

Congressional town halls were overtaken with protests in the first year of Barack Obama's term, too. They weren't taken all that seriously, at first, but developed into a wave at the ballot box.

Don Bryant's new album, Don't Give Up On Love, comes out May 12. Matt White/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Matt White/Courtesy of the artist

Songs We Love

Songs We Love: Don Bryant, 'How Do I Get There'

In a gospel lamentation, the 74-year-old Memphis soul singer invites us to take solace in the faith that a better world is attainable.

Don Bryant, 'How Do I Get There'

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Nick Dupree arrives at the Federal Courthouse in Montgomery, Ala. on Feb. 11, 2003. His success in getting the state to continue support past age 21 enabled him to attend college and live in his own home. Jamie Martin/AP hide caption

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Jamie Martin/AP

Shots - Health News

Nick Dupree Fought To Live 'Like Anyone Else'

The activist campaigned to change rules, so that people with disabilities could get nursing care and other support at home past the age of 21, and get married without losing Medicaid benefits.

Nick Dupree Fought To Live 'Like Anyone Else'

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Jane Givens searches for her father Phil Givens and her sister Biddy Givens through an ad placed in Cincinnati's The Colored Citizen in 1866. Courtesy of Last Seen hide caption

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Courtesy of Last Seen

Code Switch

After Slavery, Searching For Loved Ones In Wanted Ads

In the Civil War's waning years, African-Americans trying to find lost loved ones used classified ads in newspapers. More than 900 of these notices are now accessible via an online database.

After Slavery, Searching For Loved Ones In Wanted Ads

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Volunteers from a local monument company help to reset vandalized headstones on Feb. 22 at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City, Missouri, a St. Louis suburb. Since the beginning of the year, there has been a spike in incidents around the country, including bomb threats at Jewish community centers and reports of anti-Semitic graffiti. Michael Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Thomas/Getty Images

Parallels - World News

In Israel, Some Wonder Where The Outrage Is Over U.S. Anti-Semitic Acts

Some Israelis criticize Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for offering a less forceful response to anti-Semitic acts in the U.S. than elsewhere. Some say he wants to keep pressure off President Trump.

In Israel, Some Wonder Where The Outrage Is Over U.S. Anti-Semitic Acts

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The Garden of Eatin' diner is in Galesville, Wis., where many Democratic voters decided to vote for Donald Trump during the 2016 election. Monika Evstatieva/NPR hide caption

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Monika Evstatieva/NPR

Politics

Will Trump Democrats In Wisconsin Swing Back To Their Party?

President Trump won over Democrats in rural Wisconsin in 2016. Looking at Trump's term so far, one Democrat worries she will regret switching parties. Another says she will be voting GOP from now on.

Will Trump Democrats In Wisconsin Swing Back To Their Party?

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Dr. Mae Jemison addresses congressional representatives and distinguished guests at Bayer's Making Science Make Sense 20th anniversary celebration in 2015. Kevin Wolf/AP Images for Bayer Making Science Make Sense hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP Images for Bayer Making Science Make Sense

Space

After Making History In Space, Mae Jemison Works To Prime Future Scientists

For the first African-American woman in space, her path to spaceflight and beyond includes trying to pave the way for more girls of color to follow in her footsteps.

After Making History In Space, Mae Jemison Works To Prime Future Scientists

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International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde (from left), Jose Ugaz of Transparency International, Daria Kaleniuk of the Anti-Corruption Action Center, and Norway's Prime Minister Erna Solberg participate in a panel discussion at the Anti-Corruption Summit in London in May 2016. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

Parallels - World News

Trump's Conflicts Could Undercut Global Efforts To Fight Corruption, Critics Say

The global fight against government corruption has often been led by the U.S., but those in the movement's trenches worry that signals being sent by the Trump administration could undercut the effort.

Van Cliburn in 1966. The late pianist pulled off a stunning victory at in 1958 at the first International Tchaikovsky Piano Competition, held in Moscow at the height of the Cold War. Dutch National Archives / Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dutch National Archives / Wikimedia Commons

Deceptive Cadence

Among Pianists In Moscow, An Abiding Love For A Show-Stealing American

The late Van Cliburn won a piano competition in Moscow at the height of the Cold War. Today, pianists competing in an event named after Cliburn hold a certain reverence for the man and the moment.

Among Pianists In Moscow, An Abiding Love For A Show-Stealing American

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Vijayan's night frog (Nyctibatrachus pulivijayani), a 13.6 mm miniature-sized frog from the Agasthyamala hills in the Western Ghats in India, sits comfortably on a thumbnail. It is one of seven newly discovered frog species. SD Biju hide caption

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SD Biju

The Two-Way - News Blog

Behold: 4 New Species Of Tiny Frogs Smaller Than A Fingernail

Scientists in India say the frogs are actually fairly common but have eluded discovery likely because of their extremely small size, secretive habitats and unusual calls.

Seema Verma, who is Donald Trump's nominee to head the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has said that maternity benefits should be optional rather than required. Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Shots - Health News

GOP Considers Reduction In Health Law's 10 Essential Benefits

Maternity coverage is a popular target, but other items also might be watered down or eliminated as Republicans look for ways to replace or revise the Affordable Care Act.

A Planned Parenthood sign in Dallas. A federal judge has temporarily blocked an attempt by Texas officials that would have removed Medicaid funds from Planned Parenthood clinics in the state. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Judge Rules Texas Can't Cut Off Medicaid Funds To Planned Parenthood — For Now

After Texas officials moved to block the health provider from receiving Medicaid dollars, a federal judge issued a preliminary injunction against the state, allowing the group to stay in the program.

Protesters march in New York's Times Square on February 19, 2017, in solidarity with American Muslims and against the travel ban ordered by President Donald Trump. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Code Switch

Are Race-Based Advisory Groups Just Political Symbols?

After a scathing letter of resignation, only four people remain on the president's commission on Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders. It brings up broader questions of these task forces' efficacy.

An illustration from 1875 depicts the survivors of the frigate Cospatrick, which caught fire off South Africa's Cape of Good Hope in November 1874. Of more than 470 people on board, just three ultimately survived, and they were reduced to cannibalism. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The Salt

Cannibalism: It's 'Perfectly Natural,' A New Scientific History Argues

It's gruesome, but from a scientific standpoint, there's a predictable calculus for when humans and animals go cannibal, a new book says. And who knew European aristocrats ate body parts as medicine?