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Anti-gentrification activists staged a protest outside of Weird Wave Coffee Brewers recently, chanting "Weird Cafe has got to go." Saul Gonzalez/KCRW hide caption

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Saul Gonzalez/KCRW

Around the Nation

In This LA Neighborhood, Protest Art Is A Verb

KCRW

About a third of Boyle Heights' 90,000 residents live below the poverty line. But lower rents have attracted art galleries to the area, and that is drawing the ire of residents and activists.

In This LA Neighborhood, Protest Art Is A Verb

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Senior conservator of paintings Ann Hoenigswald works to fill in elements of Paul Cézanne's Riverbank c. 1895 in the National Gallery of Art's Paintings Conservation Lab in Washington, D.C. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Fine Art

With Chemistry And Care, Conservators Keep Masterpieces Looking Their Best

Armed with cotton swabs, strong solvents and a lot of training, conservators are entrusted with restoring priceless works of art. At the National Gallery of Art we learn that varnish is enemy No. 1.

With Chemistry And Care, Conservators Keep Masterpieces Looking Their Best

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Martin Shkreli, the former Turing Pharmaceuticals executive, arrives for the first day of jury selection in his federal securities fraud trial Monday at U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, N.Y. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli Goes On Trial On Securities Fraud Charges

Shkreli is charged with committing a series of frauds well before he became "the most hated man in America." He's been livestreaming and spending lavishly, though according to his lawyer, he's broke.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear the case on President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban targeting citizens from six predominantly Muslim countries. Brendan Smialowsk/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowsk/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

President Trump's revised travel ban can take effect in regard to foreign nationals who don't have ties to people or groups in the U.S., the Supreme Court says.

Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Shots - Health News

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

A study of whole genome sequencing found that while many people discovered genetic variations linked to rare diseases, they didn't overreact to the news.

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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In the third season of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Titus Andromedon (Tituss Burgess) gets through heartbreak by making his own version of Beyonce's Lemonade. Eric Liebowitz/Netflix hide caption

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Eric Liebowitz/Netflix

Television

Tituss Burgess Says He Plays The Most 'Everyman' Character On 'Kimmy Schmidt'

Titus Andromedon "doesn't have money to pay the rent; he can't keep a job; he gets racially profiled," Burgess says. "I mean, so what that he ... wears women's clothes?"

Tituss Burgess Says He Plays The Most 'Everyman' Character On 'Kimmy Schmidt'

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Charles Camiel looks into the camera for a facial recognition test before boarding his JetBlue flight to Aruba at Logan International Airport in Boston. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

All Tech Considered

Facial Recognition May Boost Airport Security But Raises Privacy Worries

WBUR

If you travel from Boston's Logan Airport to Aruba on JetBlue you can use your face as identification rather than a passport. Similar experiments in facial recognition are underway at other airports.

Facial Recognition May Boost Airport Security But Raises Privacy Worries

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Google has announced it will no longer scan users' emails to target ads. Above, the company's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., in 2015. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Google Says It Will No Longer Read Users' Emails To Sell Targeted Ads

The company says it will make the change later this year, bringing Gmail in line with its business products. But Google has already gathered a lot of data on users since it launched Gmail in 2004.