First lady Michelle Obama hosts the third annual "Beating the Odds" summit with future college students at the White House on July 19 in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Politics

Michelle Obama: From Reluctant Political Spouse To Pop Culture Icon

The first lady speaks Monday night at her third Democratic National Convention. Her popular image is a transformation from how she was first introduced to the country eight years ago.

Michelle Obama: From Reluctant Political Spouse To Pop Culture Icon

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Wen cleansing conditioners combine the functions of a shampoo and a conditioner. The FDA says it is investigating consumer complaints about the products. Jesse Grant/WireImage for Kari Feinstein PR/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Problems After Using Hair Conditioner Prompt An FDA Warning

After more than 100 consumers complained about symptoms like itchiness and balding, the FDA says hair conditioner is a potential culprit. But doctors warn against jumping to conclusions.

Thomas Wydra, the police chief of Hamden, Conn., decided to reform his department's traffic stop criteria after the department was singled out for stopping minority drivers at disproportionately higher rates than whites. After decreasing the number of defective equipment stops, the number of black drivers pulled over fell by 25 percent. Jeff Cohen/NPR hide caption

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Around the Nation

To Reduce Bias, Some Police Departments Are Rethinking Traffic Stops

In Hamden, Conn., minority drivers were pulled over more often than whites for defective equipment, such as broken taillights. So the police changed their strategy.

To Reduce Bias, Some Police Departments Are Rethinking Traffic Stops

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Tim LaHaye (right) and Jerry B. Jenkins sign the 12th book in the Left Behind series at a store in Spartanburg, S.C., in 2004. Mary Ann Chastain/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Tim LaHaye, Evangelical Legend Behind 'Left Behind' Series, Dies At 90

LaHaye was the co-author of the best-selling series of books about the rapture. He was the author of scores of nonfiction books as well.

LISTEN: Tim LaHaye On Fresh Air In 2004

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Tigers are given "bloodsicles," popsicles made out of blood, on hot days at the National Zoo. Courtesy of Smithsonian's National Zoo hide caption

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Animals

How Does A Tiger Keep Cool In This Heat? One Word: Bloodsicles

In the sweltering summer heat of Washington, D.C., the National Zoo gets creative to keep its guests and animals happy. That means things like popsicles made of cow blood for the big cats.

How Does A Tiger Keep Cool In This Heat? One Word: Bloodsicles

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Before becoming an actor, Michael K. Williams worked as a background dancer for performers like Madonna and George Michael. Taylor Jewell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Television

No Longer Omar: Actor Michael K. Williams On Lucky Breaks And Letting Go

Fresh Air

Over the course of his career, Williams says he's learned to separate himself from his characters (like The Wire's Omar). In HBO's The Night Of, he plays a powerful prison inmate named Freddy.

No Longer Omar: Actor Michael K. Williams On Lucky Breaks And Letting Go

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Natalie Dunnege and her son, Strazh, work on an art project at home in San Francisco. Her health insurance would cover therapy sessions to help with her depression, Dunnege says, but she hasn't been able to find a counselor who is taking new patients. Sheraz Sadiq/KQED hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Single Mom's Search For Therapist Hampered By Insurance Companies

KQED Public Media

Recent health laws were supposed to give people easier access to mental health care. But some adults who have anxiety or depression and need help are still having a tough time lining up treatment.

Single Mom's Search For Therapist Hampered By Insurance Companies

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At Ulva Island Bird Sanctuary on Stewart Island, New Zealand, a sign warned visitors in 2008 to check their bags. The fight against invasive predators continues. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Call The Pied Piper: New Zealand Wants To Get Rid Of Its Rats. All Of Them

New Zealand has no native land mammals, except for bats. For decades it's waged war on invasive predators that threaten local species. Now the government has a more ambitious goal than containment.

Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats, with Matthew Logan Vasquez, perform at the 2016 Newport Folk Festival. Adam Kissick for NPR hide caption

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Newport Folk Festival

LISTEN: Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, Live In Concert

The rootsy soul band worked through simmering soul grooves and hip-swinging honky-tonk.

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, Live In Concert: Newport Folk 2016

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Soprano Marni Nixon, shown above in June 1988, was dubbed "The Ghostess with the Mostest" in TIME magazine. "Bad rhyme, but that sort of stuck," she said. Jack Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

'Ghost' Soprano Marni Nixon, Who Voiced Blockbuster Musicals, Dies At 86

You might not know Marni Nixon's name, but you've probably heard her. Nixon dubbed the voices for Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady, Natalie Wood in West Side Story and Deborah Kerr in The King and I.

"Nobody can soldier without coffee," a Union soldier wrote in 1865. (Above) Union soldiers sit with their coffee in tin cups, their hard-tack, and a kettle at their feet. Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons hide caption

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The Salt

If War Is Hell, Then Coffee Has Offered U.S. Soldiers Some Salvation

"Nobody can soldier without coffee," a Union cavalryman wrote in 1865. Hidden Kitchens looks at three American wars through the lens of coffee: the Civil War, Vietnam and Afghanistan.

If War Is Hell, Then Coffee Has Offered U.S. Soldiers Some Salvation

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