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This image provided by Emory University shows letters sent by then future President Barack Obama to his college girlfriend Alexandra McNear. The university is making the letters available to researchers on Oct. 19, 2017 Ann Borden/Emory University/AP hide caption

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Ann Borden/Emory University/AP

The Love Letters Of A Young Barack Obama On View At Emory University Library

The musings of the future president at age 21 reveal familiar themes of alienation and lack of belonging that would arise again in his later writing.

A trader at the New York Stock Exchange reacts on Oct. 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones industrial average plunged more than 22 percent — the biggest single-day drop in history. Maria Bastone/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maria Bastone/AFP/Getty Images

The 30th Anniversary Of Black Monday: A Day That Made Wall Street Quake

On Oct. 19, 1987, Wall Street had its single worst trading day ever. Even after three decades, Black Monday still marks the biggest one-day crash, and its impact continues to reverberate.

The teen protagonist in John Green's latest novel, Turtles All The Way Down, has a type of anxiety disorder that sends her into fearful "thought spirals" of bacterial infection and death. Jennifer Kerrigan hide caption

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Jennifer Kerrigan

For Novelist John Green, OCD Is Like An 'Invasive Weed' Inside His Mind

Fresh Air

"It starts out with one little thought, and then slowly that becomes the only thought that you're able to have," Green says. His new novel, Turtles All The Way Down, is about a teenage girl with OCD.

For Novelist John Green, OCD Is Like An 'Invasive Weed' Inside His Mind

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Participants in a "Rolling Thunder" POW/MIA ceremony are reflected in a Vietnam War memorial at Lejeune Memorial Gardens in Jacksonville, N.C. Jay Price/North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price/North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

Having Changed America, The League Of POW/MIA Families Fades

North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC

Almost 50 years ago, a small group of families started a movement to demand an accounting of the nation's POW/MIAs. They changed the way America thinks about its servicemen and women lost at war.

Syrian Brig. Gen. Issam Zahreddine (right) speaks with a civilian in the eastern city of Deir Ezzor in September, during the offensive against ISIS militants. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images

Anti-ISIS Syrian General Accused Of Killing U.S. Journalist Is Reported To Have Died

Issam Zahreddine is reported to have died on the battlefield. The family of Marie Colvin, a celebrated U.S. war correspondent killed in Syria in 2012, has accused him of responsibility for her death.

The Brooklyn Public Library, Queens Public Library and New York Public Library are offering unconditional amnesty to everyone age 17 and under who has been charged with late fees for one day only, to reopen the library to kids blocked by high fees. Maurizio Siani/Getty Images hide caption

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Maurizio Siani/Getty Images

Amnesty For Little Book Lovers: New York City Libraries Shelve Kids' Late Fees

On Thursday, the city's public library systems are forgiving fines on overdue materials checked out by readers age 17 and under, reopening library doors to young readers once blocked by unpaid fees.

Val Olson (from left), Rick Kamm, Steve David and Dee Haskins play up to the net during a pickleball game at Monument Valley Park in Colorado Springs, Colo., in 2011. Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty Images

Pickleball For All: The Cross-Generational Power Of Play

A fun and social game at any age, pickleball is giving older adults — and their middle-aged kids — an extended lease on the benefits of team sports.

Ryan Johnson for NPR

Young Children Are Spending Much More Time In Front Of Small Screens

A new national survey of parents suggests mobile device use by children under 8 has increased tenfold in the last 6 years.

Young Children Are Spending Much More Time In Front Of Small Screens

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Yu Zu'en stands in front of one of the only wall decorations in his new, government-issued apartment: a poster of China's leaders. The 84-year-old veteran lost his right eye fighting the Americans in Korea in 1951. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Xi Jinping's War On Poverty Moves Millions Of Chinese Off The Farm

Remote mountain villages where residents lived in poverty are being cleared, with villagers being given new apartments in the city. But finding work may be a challenge for some of the former farmers.

Catalan regional President Carles Puigdemont addresses the media after a ceremony commemorating the 77th anniversary of the death of Catalan leader Lluis Companys at the Montjuic Cemetery in Barcelona, Spain, on Sunday. Manu Fernandez/AP hide caption

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Manu Fernandez/AP

Spain Moves To Strip Catalonia's Autonomy After Secession Showdown

Spain said it would invoke a constitutional clause allowing it to impose direct rule over semi-autonomous Catalonia after the region's leader refused to categorically renounce independence.

Former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, center, waves to his Pakistan Muslim League supporters during a party general council meeting in Islamabad, earlier this month. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

Ousted Pakistani Premier Nawaz Sharif Indicted For Corruption Charges

The former prime minister, who resigned after being disqualified from office in July, has pleaded not guilty along with his daughter and son-in-law in connection with the so-called Panama Papers.

Onlookers watch as suited men stand in front of a large copper kettle still for making illegal liquor, with boxes of bottles and funnels spread before them all for the manufacture of booze, circa 1900. Buyenlarge/Getty Images hide caption

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Buyenlarge/Getty Images

Moonshine Makes A Comeback in Virginia. And This Time, It's Legal

While the revival has taken off around the country, it's especially strong in Virginia, where many of the twists, turns and car chases that are a part of moonshine lore took place.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with members of the Senate Finance Committee and his economic team on Wednesday at the White House in Washington, D.C. Chris Kleponis/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Kleponis/Getty Images

Administration Sends Mixed Signals On State Health Insurance Waivers

When states applied for waivers from Obamacare rules to reduce premiums and strengthen their insurance markets, they didn't get the answers they wanted, prompting some to suggest a conspiracy.

Indonesian soldiers stand guard over members of the youth wing of the Indonesian Communist Party, who were packed into a truck to be taken to a Jakarta prison in October 1965. Over the next few months, the government's military leadership carried out the systematic execution of hundreds of thousands of people. /AP hide caption

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/AP

Declassified Files Lay Bare U.S. Knowledge Of Mass Murders In Indonesia

The Indonesian military systematically killed at least 500,000 people in the 1960s. Documents released Tuesday show U.S. officials knew about it from the start — and stood by as it unfolded.

Author Philip Pullman poses with his new book at Oxford's Bodleian Libraries — where he has been known to do research. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

Philip Pullman's Realm Of Poetry And Inspiration

Pullman — author of the beloved His Dark Materials trilogy — says poet William Blake's idea of mystical multiple vision, of different ways of seeing, is "absolutely central" to his new book.

A ghost stands in the ruins of a demolished building in a scene from the film A Ghost Story. Bret Curry/A24 hide caption

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Bret Curry/A24

How Composer Daniel Hart Brought 'A Ghost Story' To Life

Hart talks about the inspiration and challenges behind his stunning score for the deeply existential film A Ghost Story.

How Composer Daniel Hart Brought 'A Ghost Story' To Life

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McKayla Maroney stands on the podium at the 2012 Olympic Games in London. She says a team doctor molested her for years, including during the Olympics. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Olympic Gymnast McKayla Maroney Says She Was Molested For Years By Team Doctor

The gold medalist says Dr. Larry Nassar claimed he was giving her "medically necessary treatment." She says the abuse began on a team trip when she was 13 years old.

The Trump National Golf Club in Rancho Palos Verdes, seen in 2005, has removed a list of charitable donations it once posted on its website. An NPR examination of that list reveals inconsistencies and errors. Jeff Gross/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Gross/Getty Images

A Trump Golf Course Said It Gave Millions To Charity. Here's What The Numbers Say

Trump National Golf Club, Los Angeles, fell far short of its bold claims of philanthropic giving, according to an NPR analysis. The documents are no longer posted on the club's site.

A Trump Golf Course Said It Gave Millions To Charity. Here's What The Numbers Say

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