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Rescue personnel work at the scene of Enrique Rebsamen school, which collapsed when an earthquake struck on Tuesday. Workers have been able to communicate with a girl who's alive — but trapped in the rubble. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

Mexico City Earthquake Update: Desperate Attempts To Reach Girl Trapped By Rubble

The girl, 12, has been able to communicate with emergency crews, and she has wriggled her fingers for them through the wreckage at the Enrique Rebsamen School, south of the capital.

Earthquake Hits Mexican State Of Morelos Hard

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A duck-billed dinosaur skeleton, which the researchers think ate crustaceans, on display in 2009 at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Shellfish Surprise: Common 'Herbivore' Dinosaur Found To Snack On Crustaceans

"I immediately said, 'Oh, no, no, it can't be crustaceans.' That was my knee jerk reaction," a paleontologist said. The prehistoric snacking was likely intentional and linked to mating behaviors.

Equifax spent over $1 million last year on lobbying efforts, according to data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Equifax Breach Puts Credit Bureaus' Oversight In Question

The day that Equifax said millions of Americans' personal information had been exposed, lawmakers were considering legislation the industry favored. Now, some are calling for tougher regulation.

Equifax Breach Puts Credit Bureaus' Oversight In Question

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Archivist Amy McDonald invited some co-workers to help her re-create cherries jubilee from a university cookbook. But even with a historical paper trail, there were still things they couldn't figure out, like what to do after it starts flaming. Jerry Young/Getty Images hide caption

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Jerry Young/Getty Images

At Duke University, A Bizarre Tour Through American History And Palates

Through the Rubenstein Test Kitchen project, librarians and staff re-create historical recipes from thousands of cookbooks in the collections. Some dishes are very culturally telling ... and comical.

Former President Barack Obama speaks at Goalkeepers 2017, at Jazz at Lincoln Center Wednesday in New York City. Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Obama Argues Against Dark Worldview, Defends Health Care Law

"We have to reject the notion that we are suddenly gripped by forces that we cannot control," the former president said Wednesday, speaking in New York City while his successor was at the U.N.

Obama Argues Against Dark Worldview, Defends Health Care Law

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Irma and Oscar Sanchez were apprehended by the Border Patrol when they took their infant son, Isaac, to a children's hospital to have emergency surgery. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Border Patrol Arrests Parents While Infant Awaits Serious Operation

Irma and Oscar Sanchez, who are undocumented immigrants, were apprehended while taking their son to emergency surgery. Immigrant advocates fear this is the new normal under the Trump administration.

Border Patrol Arrests Parents While Infant Awaits Serious Operation

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Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

Researchers disabled a gene that they think helps determine which human embryos will develop normally. The technique they used is controversial because it could be used to change babies' DNA.

Antonio Santamaria (left), Emilia Rubalcaba, Veronica Segredo, Louis Perez, and Olivia Geller. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

A Miami 4th-Grader's Take On Irma: 'Like A Bad Dream ... But It's Real'

At Sunset Elementary, students are writing personal essays about their experience with Hurricane Irma, and they have some advice for other kids who have yet to live through such a storm.

Miami 4th-Graders Write About Their Experiences With Hurricanes

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In his new special, Jerry Seinfeld revisits the shop window where he first decided try stand-up and the comedy club where he became a regular in the summer of 1976. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Jerry Seinfeld's New Netflix Special Puts His Comic Life Into Perspective

Fresh Air

After more than 40 years in the business, Seinfeld revisits the clubs where he got his start. Critic David Bianculli says Jerry Before Seinfeld will make you laugh — a lot.

Jerry Seinfeld's New Netflix Special Puts His Comic Life Into Perspective

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Actress Nadine Malouf makes kubah as she tells stories about Syria's civil war in Oh My Sweet Land. Pavel Antonov /Blake Zidell & Associates hide caption

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Pavel Antonov /Blake Zidell & Associates

In Kitchens Across New York, 'Oh My Sweet Land' Serves Up Stories Of Syria

The one-woman show centers on a Syrian-American who tells harrowing stories of Syria's civil war as she prepares a traditional dish. It's an intimate experience for both the audience and the actress.

In Kitchens Across New York, 'Oh My Sweet Land' Serves Up Stories Of Syria

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