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President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talk to reporters in the Rose Garden following a lunch meeting at the White House on Monday. The two tried to downplay reports of divisions between them. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump On GOP Failures: 'I'm Not Going To Blame Myself, I'll Be Honest'

The president said on Monday that some lawmakers should be "ashamed" of themselves. Later in the day, he downplayed divisions in a Rose Garden appearance with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

A Krispy Kreme doughnut was to blame for a white substance that led to an Orlando man being jailed on drug charges. Results from roadside drug test kits conducted by law enforcement officers can be unreliable. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida Man Awarded $37,500 After Cops Mistake Glazed Doughnut Crumbs For Meth

Police departments across the country use inexpensive field tests to quickly screen for drugs, but the kits create a lot of room for error — with consequences.

MCKIBILLO/Getty Images/Imagezoo

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

Fresh Air

"Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," says sleep scientist Matthew Walker. His new book is Why We Sleep.

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'

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Albert Einstein receives his certificate of American citizenship from Judge Phillip Forman. A German-American, Einstein came to the United States in 1932. Al Aumuller/Library of Congress hide caption

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Al Aumuller/Library of Congress

'I'm An American' Radio Show Promoted Inclusion Before World War II

Before the U.S. entered the war, President Franklin D. Roosevelt wanted to promote tolerance toward immigrants. So, the government started a radio program featuring celebrity immigrants' stories.

'I'm An American' Radio Show Promoted Inclusion Before World War II

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Members of the Detroit Lions take a knee during the playing of the national anthem prior to the start of the game against the Atlanta Falcons at Ford Field on September 24, 2017 in Detroit, Michigan. Rey Del Rio/Getty Images hide caption

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Rey Del Rio/Getty Images

In New Video, Prophets Of Rage Gives NFL's #TakeAKnee Protest Historical Context

One week after Eminem's anti-Trump tirade, Chuck D's supergroup released visuals for the "Strength In Numbers" anthem, meant to boost support for the NFL's #TakeAKnee protests.

The collision of two neutron stars, seen in an artist's rendering, created both gravitational waves and gamma rays. Researchers used those signals to locate the event with optical telescopes. Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars

In an astonishing discovery, astronomers used gravitational waves to locate two neutron stars smashing together. The collision created 200 Earth masses of pure gold, along with other elements.

Anxiety-based school refusal affects 2 to 5 percent of school-age children. Some schools are employing new strategies to help these students overcome their symptoms. Anna_Isaeva/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Anna_Isaeva/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Educators Employ Strategies To Help Kids With Anxiety Return To School

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America estimates anxiety-based school refusal affects 2 to 5 percent of school-age children. It is often triggered by an underlying mental health issue.

Poet Richard Wilbur, shown at his home in Cummington, Mass., in 2006, died on Saturday at the age of 96. Wilbur, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and translator, intrigued and delighted generations of readers and theatergoers through his rhyming editions of Moliere and his own verse on memory, writing and nature. Nancy Palmieri/AP hide caption

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Nancy Palmieri/AP

Richard Wilbur, Renowned American Poet And Translator, Dies At 96

His commitment to traditional forms, with tight patterns and taut construction, stood out among his contemporaries. He said his craft was finding order in pain and chaos — not creating it.

Richard Wilbur Reads 'The Opposite Of Pillow'

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From Hamilton To Grant: Chernow Paints A 'Farsighted' President in New Biography

After the massive success of his last book, which inspired an award-winning Broadway musical, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Ron Chernow is back with a new biography of President Ulysses S. Grant.

From Hamilton To Grant: Ron Chernow Paints A 'Farsighted' President in New Biography

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Seafood processors like Ocean Beauty are some of the largest energy consumers in Kodiak, Alaska, which has generated more than 99 percent of its electricity from renewable sources since 2014. Here, the Ocean Beauty seafood plant. Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk

After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way

Alaska Public Media

Alaska is a leader in microgrids since its remote communities have had to power themselves for decades. "Alaskans have been doing this for 50 years," says Ian Baring-Gould of the National Renewable Energy Lab in Colorado.

Cities across the country are trying to land Amazon's second headquarters. In Birmingham, Ala., giant Amazon boxes were constructed and placed around the city. Ali Clark/BringAtoB Campaign hide caption

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Ali Clark/BringAtoB Campaign

Cities Go To Great Lengths To Try To Land Amazon's New HQ

Michigan Radio

Retail giant Amazon is looking for a second home, and many cities are trying to land the HQ2 project. At stake are 50,000 jobs and a new economic anchor for the winner. It has led to a lot of stunts.

Cities Dream Of Landing Amazon's New HQ And They're Going To Great Lengths To Show It

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Rohingya refugees walk through a shallow canal after crossing the Naf River to reach Bangladesh on Oct. 16. The U.N. has said that 537,000 Rohingya have arrived in Bangladesh over the last seven weeks. They are fleeing violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state, where the United Nations has accused troops of waging an ethnic cleansing campaign against them. Munir UZ Zaman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Munir UZ Zaman/AFP/Getty Images

For Half A Million Rohingya Fleeing Myanmar, Bangladesh Is A Reluctant Host

Bangladesh is struggling to accommodate 500,000-plus Rohingya who have poured across the border in less than two months. It isn't recognizing them as refugees and would prefer to see them repatriated.

For Half A Million Rohingya Fleeing Myanmar, Bangladesh Is A Reluctant Host

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Pink's seventh studio album, Beautiful Trauma, is out now. Kurt Iswarienko/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Kurt Iswarienko/Courtesy of the artist

'I Could Do So Much More:' Pink On 'Beautiful Trauma'

In an interview with NPR's Michel Martin, Pink speaks on her latest album and her political responsibility as an artist.

'I Could Do So Much More:' Pink On 'Beautiful Trauma'

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