A meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous in the 1950s was based on much the same 12-step program used today. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Critic Faults Alcoholics Anonymous For Lack Of Evidence

Writer Gabrielle Glaser challenges the usefulness of Alcoholics Anonymous in April's issue of The Atlantic. The program's tenets aren't based in science, she says, and other options may work better.

"Abraham Lincoln held this seat in Congress for one term but few faced as many defeats in his personal, business and public life as he did," Rep. Schock said on the House floor Thursday. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Kris Connor/Getty Images

It's All Politics

In Bidding Farewell, Rep. Aaron Schock Compares Himself To Lincoln

The Republican from Illinois will resign his seat at the end of the month. His resignation comes after weeks of questions about his judgment, lavish lifestyle and spending.

Timothy Olyphant plays Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens on FX's Justified, which is based on a novella by Elmore Leonard. The show's creator, Graham Yost, says the only "tussle" the writers had with Leonard happened during the pilot, over which hat Raylan should wear. Prashant Gupta/FX hide caption

itoggle caption Prashant Gupta/FX

Television

'Justified' Creator Aims To Stay True To The Late Writer Elmore Leonard

The FX series, now in its final season, is based on Leonard's novella Fire in the Hole. Showrunner Graham Yost says, "I look at this show as Elmore Leonard's show, and we're all in service of him."

After getting a ride to Hubei province from NPR's Frank Langfitt, Xiao Piao and her wedding party make their way up a muddy hill to the two-story, ochre-colored farm house where her fiance Rocky grew up. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

Asia

A Reporter Chauffeurs A Chinese Couple 500 Miles To Their Rural Wedding

NPR's Frank Langfitt, who has been driving Chinese people around Shanghai to meet a variety of people and better understand the rapidly changing country, takes his experiment to a whole new level.

Congress tries every year to plug a loophole that would otherwise result in a 21 percent cut in Medicare doctors' pay. But it doesn't exactly always tighten its belt in the process. Key Wilde/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Key Wilde/Getty Images

It's All Politics

Skinny Jeans, Expanded Waistlines, And A Washington 'Fix'

Congress has acted 17 times to prevent a cut in Medicare doctors' payments. But the so-called "doc fix" has always been like that pair of jeans you keep in your closet, hoping someday they'll fit.

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