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Tom Lever and Aaliyah Jones, both of Charlottesville, Va., put up a sign that reads "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park on Tuesday, in Charlottesville, Va. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/AP

Mourners To Honor Charlottesville Victim, States Debate Confederate Statues

Heather Heyer was killed when the driver of a car rammed into a crowd protesting a white nationalist rally in the Virginia city. Two people have filed a lawsuit against the car's driver and others.

Yuliana Rocha Zamarripa's workers' comp claim for a serious knee injury at work prompted her arrest. She was shuffled from county to immigration jails for a year and blames the sexual abuse of her daughter on her inability to protect her at home. Scott McIntyre for ProPublica hide caption

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Scott McIntyre for ProPublica

They Got Hurt At Work — Then They Got Deported

ProPublica

A joint investigation by NPR and ProPublica shows how a loophole in Florida law has led to the arrest and even deportation of undocumented immigrants after they suffer legitimate injuries on the job.

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NPR

Trump Blames 'Both Sides' In Charlottesville; NAFTA Talks Open In Washington

President Trump weighs in again on the violence in Charlottesville, Va. And, officials from the U.S., Canada and Mexico meet in Washington, D.C., to begin renegotiating NAFTA.

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

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The Department of Justice has issued a warrant for a web hosting company to turn over all records related to the website of #DisruptJ20, a group that organized actions to disrupt President Trump's inauguration in January. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

DOJ Demands Files On Anti-Trump Activists, And A Web Hosting Company Resists

Legal experts called the government's demand for information unusually broad. DreamHost says the warrant would require it to hand over logs of 1.3 million visits to its customer's website.

Several downtown stores have put up signs and placards declaring: "This is Our Town" and "If Equality and Diversity Aren't for You, Then Neither Are We." Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Charlottesville Businesses Worry Violent Rally Will Scare Tourists Away

Businesses in Charlottesville, Va., suffered an economic blow after a white nationalist rally turned deadly over the weekend. The violence prompted some to rethink who to welcome through their doors.

Charlottesville Businesses Worry Violent Rally Will Scare Tourists Away

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Steve Hirsch boasts that the fire department in tiny Hoxie, Kan., is fully staffed. But, Hirsch says, if you get in a wreck on a rural stretch of highway nearby, another department may not be. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

Fighting Fires For Free, Aging Volunteers Struggle To Recruit The Next Generation

KCUR 89.3

If you get in a car accident on a rural stretch of highway in Kansas, one volunteer firefighter says, you'd better hope it happens near a county with a well-equipped fire department.

A growing number of food videos aim to trigger ASMR — Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or pleasing sensations in the brains of some viewers — by focusing on sounds like chopping and stirring. Christina Lee for NPR hide caption

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Christina Lee for NPR

Shh! These Quiet Food Videos Will Get Your Senses Tingling

A growing number of food videos aim to trigger ASMR — Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or pleasing sensations in the brains of some viewers — by focusing on sounds like chopping and stirring.

An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office released Tuesday found that ending cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers, a move that President Trump is contemplating, would raise the deficit by $194 billion over 10 years. Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images

CBO Predicts Rise In Deficit If Trump Cuts Payments To Insurance Companies

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that ending what's known as cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers will raise the deficit $194 billion over 10 years.

CBO Predicts Rise In Deficit If Trump Cuts Payments To Insurance Companies

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Björk Santiago Felipe/Getty Images Portrait hide caption

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Santiago Felipe/Getty Images Portrait

Guest DJ Week: Björk

Our week of guest DJs continues with Björk. In this 2009 conversation the Icelandic singer spoke about her love of Syrian musician Omar Souleyman, fellow Icelandic artist Ólöf Arnalds and more.

Björk

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Dillon Katz, at home in Delray Beach, Fla., says recovering drug users in his group counseling meetings frequently used to offer to help him get into a new treatment facility. He suspects now they were recruiters — so-called "body brokers" — who were receiving illegal kickbacks from the corrupt facility. Peter Haden/WLRN hide caption

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Peter Haden/WLRN

'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab

WLRN 91.3FM

In South Florida, people with health insurance are the target of "body brokers" who can earn lucrative kickbacks — $500 per week — for referring vulnerable patients to centers that bilk insurers.

'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab

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Applebee's recently announced it will close more than 130 restaurants by the end of the year, after rebranding efforts failed to attract millennials. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Applebee's Gives Up On Millennials After Failed Rebranding Efforts

The restaurant chain will close more than 130 locations this year. That's due to a drop in sales at franchises and a rebranding that left core customers feeling alienated and confused.

Applebee's Gives Up On Millennials After Failed Rebranding Efforts

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President Trump speaks during a meeting with manufacturing executives at the White House in February, including Merck's Kenneth Frazier (center) and Ford's Mark Fields. Frazier has resigned from the president's manufacturing council. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

CEOs' Dilemma: Supporting Trump's Agenda, Opposing His Behavior

Several prominent chief executives are leaving President Trump's manufacturing advisory board in response to his views on the violence in Charlottesville. The decision to leave is harder for some companies than others.

CEOs' Dilemma: Supporting Trump's Agenda, Opposing His Behavior

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Protesters hold signs and chant at a rally for DACA in Washington, D.C. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

Five Years In, What's Next For DACA?

Immigrant rights groups and students gathered at the White House to protest the possible repeal of DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Five Years In, What's Next For DACA?

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A Texas A&M student signs a message board ahead of an "Aggies United" event at the university on Dec. 6. The event was scheduled for the same time as a speech by white separatist Richard Spencer. Spencer was scheduled to return to the school for a "White Lives Matter" rally on Sept. 11, which the school has called off. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Texas A&M Cancels Sept. 11 'White Lives Matter' Rally Over Safety Concerns

The organizer of the rally posted a message online stating "Today Charlottesville, Tomorrow Texas A&M." But the school said that after consulting with law enforcement, it decided to cancel the event.

107-year-old Mirza Naseem Changezi (left) sits with his son Khalid Changezi, 60, at their home in the Old City of New Delhi. Changezi is reputed to be the Old City's oldest resident and says there was never any question of leaving India for Pakistan. The Changezis trace their roots back 23 generations. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

For India's Oldest Citizens, Independence Day Spurs Memories Of A Painful Partition

Seventy years later, memories of the 1947 Partition stir deep emotions and some soul-searching among the last generation of Indians to have witnessed it. Here are a few of their stories.

For India's Oldest Citizens, Independence Day Spurs Memories Of A Painful Partition

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Grizzly bear cubs follow their mother in British Columbia, Canada, in 2014. The province has banned trophy hunting of grizzlies beginning at the end of November. Mick Thompson hide caption

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Mick Thompson

British Columbia Will Ban Grizzly Bear Trophy Hunting

The policy still allows people to hunt the bears for food but blocks all hunting of grizzlies in the Great Bear Rainforest. Environmental groups are celebrating but remain concerned about possible loopholes.

Thieves made off with a refrigerated trailer packed with Nutella, Kinder Surprise eggs and other treats in Neustadt, Germany. Allison Hare/Flickr hide caption

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Allison Hare/Flickr

Truck With 20 Tons Of Nutella And Chocolate Vanishes; Police Hunt For Semi's Sweets

The theft happened this weekend in Germany, according to officials, who warn: "Anyone offered large quantities [of chocolate] via unconventional channels should report it to the police immediately."

Grace Mugabe, Zimbabwe's first lady, speaks at a rally in front of a massive portrait of her husband, longtime President Robert Mugabe, earlier this summer. She is accused of assaulting a young woman Sunday night. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

Zimbabwe's First Lady Accused Of Beating South African Model With Extension Cord

Grace Mugabe, wife of longtime leader Robert Mugabe, allegedly assaulted a model who says she was at the same hotel as Mugabe's sons. But so far, Mugabe has not surrendered to South African police.