The condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is inherited and can be a killer. But some of the genetic mutations once thought linked to the illness are actually harmless, geneticists say. Afton Almaraz/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Study Of Sudden Cardiac Death Exposes Limits Of Genetic Testing

Some genetic tests for a common cause of sudden heart failure can be wrong, researchers say, because the underlying science didn't take into account racial diversity.

Study Of Sudden Cardiac Death Exposes Limits Of Genetic Testing

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Careful audits of a representative sampling of bills from 37 Medicare Advantage Programs in 2007 have revealed some consistent patterns in the way they overbill, a Center for Public Integrity investigation finds. Nick Shepherd/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Audits Of Some Medicare Advantage Plans Reveal Pervasive Overcharging

The Center for Public Integrity

Federal audits of 37 Medicare Advantage health plans cited 35 for overbilling the government. Many plans, for example, claimed patients with depression or diabetes were sicker than they actually were.

In the 1980s and 1990s, Ross was a fixture on PBS. The Joy of Painting invited viewers to watch over Ross' shoulder as he created small masterpieces in under 30 minutes. Bob Ross Inc. hide caption

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Arts & Life

The Real Bob Ross: Meet The Meticulous Artist Behind Those Happy Trees

Don't be fooled by his mild PBS persona; the beloved painter was actually an exacting artist and businessman with — brace yourself — naturally straight hair.

The Real Bob Ross: Meet The Meticulous Artist Behind Those Happy Trees

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Researchers are recruiting volunteers to participate in a four-year study trial of cocoa extract. Half of the participants will take capsules containing about as much cocoa extract as you'd get from eating about 1,000 calories of dark chocolate. Dennis Gottlieb/Getty Images hide caption

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The Salt

A Chocolate Pill? Scientists To Test Whether Cocoa Extract Boosts Health

Chocolate lovers may agree cocoa is the food of the gods, but how strong is the evidence that it boosts heart health? Researchers are recruiting for a new study aimed at answering this question.

A Chocolate Pill? Scientists To Test Whether Cocoa Extract Boosts Health

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Residents of Valdivia, Chile, look over wrecked buildings on May 31, 1960. AP hide caption

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Science

When The Biggest Earthquake Ever Recorded Hit Chile, It Rocked The World

In 1960, all of Chile shook violently for more than 10 minutes. That quake along the western coast of South America was so big it changed the way people see the world.

When The Biggest Earthquake Ever Recorded Hit Chile, It Rocked The World

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Retired neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson speaks at the Republican National Convention on July 19 in Cleveland. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Politics

Carson Defends Trump's Minority Outreach As Break From 'Traditional' Politics

Donald Trump has shifted his message to more actively court minority voters — including a recent meeting with black and Latino supporters. Ben Carson casts the new message as an effort to find solutions.

Carson Defends Trump's Minority Outreach As Break From 'Traditional' Politics

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The spires of the historic Salt Lake Temple on April 2, 2016 in Salt Lake City, Utah. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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Religion

'Cultural Mormons' Adjust The Lifestyle But Keep The Label

Some Mormons choose to leave the faith but not the community. And they are learning to tread new ground where belonging can exist sometimes without belief.

'Cultural Mormons' Adjust The Lifestyle But Keep The Label

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Invincible Iron Man — featuring the debut of a new hero, Riri Williams — is one five books Marvel is using to promote science, math, and arts disciplines through a series of covers. Courtesy of Marvel hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

A Hero For The Arts And Sciences: Upcoming Marvel Covers Promote STEAM Fields

The five covers feature the company's heroes — including Spiderman, Iron Man, and the Hulk — all engaging in activities educators have been trying to promote.

Job consultant Saskia Ben jemaa sits in a welcome center for immigrants on Aug. 18 in Berlin. The center assists immigrants and refugees with asylum status in finding jobs, housing and qualification recognition of their previous employment and education. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels - World News

Despite Early Optimism, German Companies Hire Few Refugees

More than a million asylum seekers arrived in Germany last year. After three months, they are allowed to work. The CEO of Daimler predicted a new "economic miracle." But it hasn't happened.

Reiko Tsuzuki, 70, makes buckwheat soba noodles by hand in her restaurant kitchen in the Japanese island of Shikoku. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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The Salt

Japan's Centuries-Old Tradition Of Making Soba Noodles

In the remote mountains of the Japanese island of Shikoku, an old woman makes soba noodles by hand from locally grown buckwheat. It's ancient technique that is adapting to modern times.

Japan's Centuries-Old Tradition Of Making Soba Noodles

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