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(Left to right) Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray and Mexican Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong greet each other during a news conference in Mexico City on Thursday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

On Tillerson And Kelly Visit, Mexico Seeks 'Clarity' On Immigration Proposals

Just days after the Department of Homeland Security detailed how it will implement President Trump's policies, Mexican officials warned Thursday they would not accept "measures imposed unilaterally."

Edward Price resigned from his position at the CIA on Feb. 14 after working there since 2006. Courtesy of Edward Price hide caption

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Courtesy of Edward Price

National Security

Disgusted By Trump, A CIA Officer Quits. How Many More Could Follow?

Ned Price made a big public exit in protest over President Trump. Other CIA workers say they want to wait and see. Tension between the White House and the intelligence community simmers.

Disgusted By Trump, A CIA Officer Quits. How Many More Could Follow?

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Lucia Adeng Wek holds her 3-year-old son, Wek Wol Wek, who suffers from malnutrition. They're at a clinic in South Sudan run by Doctors without Borders and were photographed on Oct. 11, 2016. Albert Gonzalez Farran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran/AFP/Getty Images

Goats and Soda

Who Declares A Famine? And What Does That Actually Mean?

Similar to categories for hurricanes and earthquakes, officials have developed a five-phase scale to rank food crises.

Who Declares A Famine? And What Does That Actually Mean?

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Iraqi forces gather at Mosul's airport during an offensive to retake the western side of the city from ISIS Thursday. Government forces reportedly entered the airport on the southern edge of the city for the first time since 2014. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Fight For Mosul Moves Westward And Centers On City's Airport

Inside western Mosul, a resident tells NPR that ISIS has forced residents to knock holes in their houses to create tunnels for the militants to use.

The one thing that's certain is that their will be changes in the Affordable Care Act. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

What's Next For The Affordable Care Act? Your Questions Answered

Kaiser Health News

A lot of people are confused about when and if Republicans can "repeal and replace" the Affordable Care Act. Kaiser Health News' Julie Rovner clears things up in the first of a series.

What's Next For The Affordable Care Act? Your Questions Answered

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Watani: My Homeland follows Hala Kamil and her family as they move from Aleppo, Syria, to a small German city that welcomes refugees. Alina Emrich/Courtesy of Dish Communications hide caption

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Alina Emrich/Courtesy of Dish Communications

Movies

These Oscar-Nominated Documentaries Tell Intimate Stories Of Syria's Civil War

Three of the five films in the documentary short category show Syrians affected by the years-long conflict, including a group of civilian rescue volunteers, fleeing refugees and a resettled family.

These Oscar-Nominated Documentaries Tell Intimate Stories Of Syria's Civil War

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Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

To Test Zika Vaccines, Scientists Need A New Outbreak

Kaiser Health News

It's a bit of a paradox, but researchers say they need Zika virus to re-emerge this year so they can test vaccines designed to defeat it.

Scientists rallied for evidence-based public policy outside the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco in December. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

A "March for Science" is set for April 22 in Washington, D.C., to show support for evidence-based public policy. But some worry the march will be seen as partisan, and may even undermine sound policy.

Should Scientists March? U.S. Researchers Still Debating Pros And Cons

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Tohono O'odham Vice Chairman Verlon Jose says "over my dead body will we build a wall" on the reservation. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Around the Nation

Border Wall Would Cut Across Land Sacred To Native Tribe

KJZZ

The Tohono O'odham tribe on the U.S.-Mexico border says a wall would desecrate a mountain where they say their creator lives. Still, they want to help Donald Trump keep illegal border crossers out.

Border Wall Would Cut Across Land Sacred To Native Tribe

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Blanck Mass' new album, World Eater, comes out March 3. Harrison Reid/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Harrison Reid/Courtesy of the artist

First Listen

First Listen: Blanck Mass, 'World Eater'

Benjamin John Power's noisier impulses mask a symphonic scope of veritable Vangelis proportions.

World Eater

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Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks during the Munich Security Conference last week. McCain's office has confirmed that while he was overseas, he met with U.S. forces in Syria about defeating ISIS. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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Matthias Schrader/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Sen. McCain Makes Unannounced Trip To Syria To Meet With U.S. Forces

John McCain, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, went to Syria last week to discuss the campaign for defeating militants from the Islamic State.

Keitra Bates stands in front of the building she plans to turn into Marddy's shared kitchen and marketplace. Debbie Elliot/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliot/NPR

Kitchen Table Conversations

Preserving The Flavor Of An Atlanta Neighborhood

Entrepreneur Keitra Bates is opening a shared commercial kitchen to help keep culinary traditions alive on the city's gentrifying west side.

Preserving The Flavor Of An Atlanta Neighborhood

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