Two sisters, Majda (left) and Amina Belaroui, answered the call to volunteer for the French military reserves following the recent terrorist attack in Nice. But Majda refused to remove her headscarf and hijab, as required under a French law. Amina didn't want to remove her scarf and hijab, but reluctantly agreed to do so. Courtesy of Majda and Amina Belaroui hide caption

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Parallels - World News

French Army Asks Citizens To Enlist — But No Muslim Headscarves, Please.

Two sisters, devout Muslims and French patriots, wanted to help the military in the wake of a terrorist attack. They were told they have to remove their headscarves. So what did they do?

Michael Peterson, an archaeologist at Redwood National Park in California, photographs the coastline annually to monitor erosion of archaeological sites. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

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National Park Service Centennial

As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Until now, the archaeological philosophy at Redwood National Park has been "keep it in the ground." But for one Native American site, climate change may force the park to reconsider that approach.

As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

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A CT scan of the skull of a 2,200-year-old Egyptian mummy on display in the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, shows osteoporosis and tooth decay, the museum said Tuesday. Ariel Schalit/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Mummified Egyptian Was Just As Sedentary And Carb-Hungry As Modern Men

A 2,200-year-old mummy going on display in Israel shows some of the same ailments modern people suffer from: osteoporosis, tooth decay, and other effects of an inactive, carbohydrate-rich lifestyle.

Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

New research suggests it may be possible to spot people in the early stages of Alzheimer's by testing their ability to recognize fragrances. The goal is a quick and inexpensive screening test.

All Songs Considered

What We Saw At The 2016 Newport Folk Festival

More than four dozen bands played at this year's festival, which was full of serendipitous moments. Our photographer Adam Kissick captured it all.

Woohoo! Get wild, all ye Starbucks employees. Now crew necks are acceptable work wear! Starbucks hide caption

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The Salt

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

Yes, the green aprons remain, but you may begin noticing more personal flair underneath. Instead of black and white garments, baristas are now free to embrace "drabby chic."

Starbucks' New Dress Code: Purple Hair And Fedoras OK, But Hoodies Forbidden

Audio will be available later today.

David Daleiden (left foreground) speaks to the media after appearing in court at the Harris County Courthouse on February 4 in Houston, Texas. All charges against Daleiden and his fellow anti-abortion activist Sandra Merritt have been dropped. Eric Kayne/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Judge Drops Charges Against Anti-Abortion Activists Behind Covert Recordings

David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt used fake IDs to try to buy fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood. They were indicted for tampering with government records, but the charges were dismissed on technical grounds.

Delrawn Small's companion Zaquanna Albert, left, and his brother Victor Demsey, center, and Cynthia Howell, right, an advocate with Families United for Justice, an organization made up of families affected by police killings, attend a news conference Thursday July 14, 2016 in New York. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Code Switch

Who Is Delrawn Small? Why Some Police Shootings Get Little Media Attention

Some police shooting victims like Alton Sterling and Philando Castile become national symbols. Their faces are splashed across the media, and their names become hashtags. So why are others forgotten?

Who Is Delrawn Small? Why Some Police Shootings Get Little Media Attention

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Tesla vehicles sit parked outside of a new Tesla showroom and service center in Brooklyn, New York on July 5. The electric car company has come under increasing scrutiny following a crash of one of its electric cars while using the controversial Autopilot feature. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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All Tech Considered

Tesla's Ambitions Run Into The Realities Of Making Cars

Tesla, which has roots in the tech world, is facing the challenge of becoming a successful car company amid scrutiny over its autopilot technology.

Tesla's Ambitions Run Into The Realities Of Making Cars

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Helen Gurley Brown in her office at Cosmopolitan magazine in the 1960s .The legendary editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)." Santi Visalli/Getty Images hide caption

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The Salt

Collards And Canoodling: How Helen Gurley Brown Promoted Premarital Cooking

The legendary Cosmo editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells — and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)."

A French police officer stands guard by Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray's city hall following a hostage-taking at a church in the small town on Tuesday. Two men with knives attacked the church, killing a priest, police say. Police said they killed two hostage-takers in the attack in the Normandy town, 77 miles north of Paris. Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

2 Men Take Hostages, Kill Priest In French Church; Attack Claimed By ISIS

Two men attacked a church near Rouen during Tuesday Mass, killing an elderly priest before being shot to death by police. One of the assailants had tried to travel to Syria and was under surveillance.

A view of the Russian Federal Security Services (FSB) on Lubyanka Square in Moscow in 2013. Journalists, dissidents and human rights workers say they are often followed or harrassed by the Russian spy service. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Parallels - World News

Was That A Russian Spy, Or Am I Getting Paranoid?

Journalists, dissidents, human rights workers all tell stories of being followed and harassed by Russia's security services. They range from the comical to the frightening.

Was That A Russian Spy, Or Am I Getting Paranoid?

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Somali soldiers stand guard next to the wreckage of a car bomb outside the U.N.'s office in Mogadishu on Tuesday. At least 13 people were killed in twin bombings near U.N. and African Union buildings adjoining Mogadishu's airport, police said, in what the jihadist al-Shabab group claimed as a suicide attack. Mohamed Abdiwahab/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Suicide Bombings In Somalia's Capital Kill 13 Near Peacekeeping Base

Car bombs detonated at checkpoints near the entrance to one of the African Union bases in Mogadishu, killed more than a dozen people. The base is used by the Union's peacekeeping troops.

In 2016, Mesa Verde National Park officials closed Spruce Tree House because of crumbling rock. Previous restoration efforts and more extreme temperature swings, which may be connected to climate change, are two reasons why staff here thinks rock is crumbling. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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National Park Service Centennial

To Preserve History, A National Park Preps For Climate Change

Colorado Public Radio

Climate change is affecting what visitors see in Mesa Verde National Park. Over the last decade, scorching wildfires have destroyed archaeological artifacts — and have also revealed new ones.

To Preserve History, A National Park Preps For Climate Change

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The mother of Fabiana Flosi, seen here with her husband, Formula One racing Bernie Ecclestone, has reportedly been kidnapped in Brazil. Flosi and Ecclestone are seen here in 2014, after a court proceeding in Germany. Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Formula One Boss Bernie Ecclestone's Mother-In-Law Is Kidnapped In Brazil

The billionaire's wife is Brazilian; kidnappers are asking for a $37 million ransom. The abduction sent shock waves through the sporting world.

New drugs like Harvoni effectively cure hepatitis C, but they haven't yet been approved for use in children. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Children Exposed To Hepatitis C May Be Missing Out On Treatment

WHYY

Now that there are better treatments for hepatitis C in adults, doctors hope the drugs soon will be approved for use in children who were infected at birth. But many at-risk infants don't get tested.