With the Periscope app, owned by Twitter, it's easy for smartphone users to stream their own video live. Chris Jackson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chris Jackson/Getty Images

All Tech Considered

With Live Video Apps Like Periscope, Life Becomes Even Less Private

Video cameras are everywhere — from those in smartphones to security cams. And just when you thought it couldn't get harder to hide, live-streaming video apps are raising new questions about privacy.

A blind visitor to Spain's Prado Museum runs his fingers across a 3-D copy of the Mona Lisa, painted by an apprentice to Leonardo da Vinci. The 'Touching the Prado' exhibit features 3-D versions of the museum's most famous works. Ignacio Hernando Rodriguez/Courtesy of Prado Museum hide caption

itoggle caption Ignacio Hernando Rodriguez/Courtesy of Prado Museum

Parallels - World News

Do Touch The Artwork At Prado's Exhibit For The Blind

The renowned Spanish museum has made 3-D copies of some of its most iconic works to allow blind people to feel them.

A sign encouraging people to save water is displayed at a news conference in Los Angeles. Water use restrictions in California amidst the state's ongoing drought have led to the phenomenon of "droughtshaming," or publicly calling out water wasters. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Nick Ut/AP

Around the Nation

In California, Technology Makes "Droughtshaming" Easier Than Ever

As California's drought continues, social media and smart phone apps let just about anyone call out water waste, often very publicly.

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Charles Ornstein with his parents at his Bar Mitzvah. Through their voice messages, saved on his phone, Ornstein has a trove of verbal memories. Charles Ornstein hide caption

itoggle caption Charles Ornstein

Digital Life

'Kiss Everybody': Voice Mails Live On After Parents Are Gone

Writer Charles Ornstein's parents endure in many forms — photos, videos, serving platters and wine glasses. But the voice mails — those unscripted moments of everyday life — he can carry in his pocket.

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American Outlaws, seen on the big screen, cheer for the U.S. women's national team more than half an hour before kickoff during a match with Mexico on May 17. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

Sports

For Women's World Cup, U.S. Soccer Fans Kick It Up A Notch

They've been supporting the men for years. But for the first time, the American Outlaws — a growing and influential U.S. soccer fan group — will cheer for the women's national team at a World Cup.

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Army veteran Bernie Klemanek, of Mineral, Va., stops to salute his fallen comrades on Memorial Day during an early morning visit today to "The Wall" at the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Obama Honors The Sacrifice Of Service Members

The president called Arlington National Cemetery "more than a final resting place for fallen heroes." It is, he said, "a reflection of America itself."

NPR Ed

Through Performance, Mississippi Students Honor Long-Forgotten Locals

Every year, a history teacher in Columbus, Miss., takes high schoolers to the local cemetery. There, they tell the stories of those who are buried, and learn more about their own place in the world.

Ada Colau (center), leader of the Barcelona en Comú party, celebrates in Barcelona during a press conference following the results in Spain's municipal and regional elections on May 24. She is the first member of Spain's indignados protest movement to win public office. Quique Garcia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Quique Garcia/AFP/Getty Images

Parallels - World News

From 'Occupying' A Spanish Bank To City Hall: Barcelona's New Mayor

The status quo took a hit in Spanish elections over the weekend. A major upset came in Barcelona with a win by Ada Colau, a prominent activist who fought evictions during Spain's economic crisis.

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