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"DoggoLingo" is a language trend that's been gaining steam on the Internet in the past few years. Words like doggo, pupper and blep most often accompany a picture or video of a dog and have spread on social media. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

All Tech Considered

Dogs Are Doggos: An Internet Language Built Around Love For The Puppers

DoggoLingo is a rising language on the Internet that's full of cutesy suffixes and onomatopoeias. It might even change the way you talk to your pet.

Cattle owned by Fulani herdsmen graze in a field outside Kaduna, northwest Nigeria in February 2017. Stefan Heunis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Heunis/AFP/Getty Images

Goats and Soda

Clashes Over Grazing Land In Nigeria Threaten Nomadic Herding

Nomadic herders who live across West Africa are having to travel further and further south for their cows to graze. Some are letting cows graze on cropland, leading to deadly conflicts with farmers.

Clashes Over Grazing Land In Nigeria Threaten Nomadic Herding

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Donald Trump plays a round of golf after the opening of The Trump International Golf Links Course on July 10, 2012, in Balmedie, Scotland. Ian MacNicol/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian MacNicol/Getty Images

Politics

Trump, The Golfer In Chief

President Trump plays a lot of golf. But not nearly as much as Woodrow Wilson.

Trump, The Golfer In Chief

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NPR Ed

Student Loans: You've Got Questions, We've Got Answers

Is trade school the ticket? Does the middle class have the worst debt woes? Listeners weigh in with burning student loan questions.

Student Loans: You've Got Questions, We've Got Answers

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Martin Luther King, Jr. listening to a transistor radio in the front line of the third march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to campaign for proper registration of black voters, March 23, 1965. Ralph Abernathy (second from left), Ralph Bunche (third from right) and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (far right) march with him. William Lovelace/Getty Images hide caption

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William Lovelace/Getty Images

Code Switch

Black-Jewish Relations Intensified And Tested By Current Political Climate

Activist ties that go back to the Civil Rights Movement are being strained by divergent viewpoints on the movement for black lives and Israel's position on Palestine.

The crew of the Memphis Belle, a Flying Fortress B-17F, poses in front of their plane in 1943, in Asheville, N.C. AP hide caption

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AP

History

At 75, A World War II Legend Gets A Full Makeover

At the Air Force museum in Dayton, technicians and volunteers are working to restore a unique piece of history. The B-17 bomber Memphis Belle is being carefully returned to its wartime appearance.

At 75, A World War II Legend Gets A Full Makeover

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

Author Interviews

Dark Lives Of 'The Radium Girls' Left A Bright Legacy For Workers, Science

Kate Moore's new book digs into the short, painful lives of the Radium Girls, who worked painting luminous dials on watches and clocks — and were poisoned by the glowing radium paint they used.

Dark Lives Of 'The Radium Girls' Left A Bright Legacy For Workers, Science

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You may be tempted to save a piece of a moldy loaf by discarding the fuzzy bits. But food safety experts say molds penetrate deeper into the food than what's visible to us. And eating moldy food comes with health risks. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

The Salt

Is It Safe To Eat Moldy Bread?

No, say food safety experts. Molds can easily penetrate deep into a soft food, like bread. But you can salvage other foods with tougher surfaces, like cabbages, carrots and hard cheeses.