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Cars line up to cross into the U.S. at the Canadian border on Feb. 25, in Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Around the Nation

Canadians Report More Scrutiny And Rejection At U.S. Border Checkpoints

Immigration lawyers say they've seen a spike in the number of Canadians turned back at the U.S. border since January. But federal officials insist that no policies have changed on the American side.

Canadians Report More Scrutiny And Rejection At U.S. Border Checkpoints

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Gender-neutral signs are posted outside public restrooms at the 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Census Bureau says it is not planning to ask about gender identity or sexual orientation in the 2020 Census. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

U.S. Census To Leave Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity Questions Off New Surveys

"Sexual orientation and gender identity" was listed in a Census Bureau report as a proposed topic for the 2020 Census or the American Community Survey. But the topic was later removed.

Judge Neil Gorsuch is sworn in on the first day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on March 20, 2017. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Politics

A 'Nuclear' Senate Showdown Next Week Appears All But Inevitable

If Senate Democrats are determined to oppose the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch, Senate Republicans are just as determined to confirm him.

A 'Nuclear' Senate Showdown Next Week Appears All But Inevitable

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Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price at a March 17 news conference with Reps. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., and Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

6 Changes The Trump Administration Can Still Make To Obamacare

The Republican overhaul bill died, but the health care drama continues. There are lots of ways the Trump administration can change regulations and how the Affordable Care Act is administered — without congressional approval.

European Council President Donald Tusk holds up the document from the U.K. in Brussels on Wednesday. Tusk has received a letter from British Prime Minister Theresa May invoking Article 50 of the bloc's key treaty, the formal start of exit negotiations. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

Parallels - World News

With Brexit Triggered, Uncertainty Continues Over What's To Come

The British are known for understatement, but political observers speak of Brexit in superlatives. They say it could prove transformational for the country – either for good or ill.

Pesticide warning sign in an orange grove. The sign, in English and Spanish, warns that the pesticide chlorpyrifos, or Lorsban, has been applied to these orange trees. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

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Jim West/Science Source

The Salt

Will The EPA Reject A Pesticide Or Its Own Scientific Evidence?

The agency must decide this week whether to ban chlorpyrifos, a pesticide widely used on produce. The EPA thinks it could pose risks to consumers. But its new head made his name fighting such rules.

Will The EPA Reject A Pesticide, Or Its Own Scientific Evidence?

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An M-44 device — also known as a "cyanide bomb" for the way it sprays sodium cyanide — sits nested between two rocks. Several petitions are now calling for the removal of these devices used to protect livestock from predators. Mark Mansfield, father of a boy accidentally sprayed March 16 in Idaho, calls M-44s "neither safe nor humane." Bannock County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bannock County Sheriff's Office

The Two-Way - News Blog

Calls Mount For Ban On 'Cyanide Bombs' After Death Of Family Pet

An M-44, which sprays predators with sodium cyanide, detonated on a teen and his dog earlier this month in Idaho. Now the family and others are petitioning the USDA to end its use of the devices.

Bill Baroni, former deputy executive director of The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, has been sentenced to a two-year prison term. He's seen here arriving at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Courthouse for Wednesday's hearing. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Former Christie Ally Sentenced To 2 Years, Another To 18 Months In Bridgegate

Bill Baroni and Bridget Kelly were accused of playing key roles in a traffic nightmare on the George Washington Bridge back in 2013. The four days of lane closures were widely seen as retaliation against the mayor of Fort Lee, N.J., for not endorsing Gov. Chris Christie during his re-election campaign.

David Robert Daleiden (right) leaves a courtroom after a hearing in Houston. California prosecutors say two anti-abortion activists who made undercover videos of themselves trying to buy fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood have been charged with 15 felony counts of invasion of privacy. State Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the charges Tuesday. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

2 Activists Who Secretly Recorded Planned Parenthood Face New Felony Charges

A Texas judge dismissed earlier felony charges against anti-abortion rights activists David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt. Now they face charges in California for allegedly recording people without permission.

Chelsea Beck/NPR

Code Switch

Sanctuary Churches: Who Controls The Story?

This week on the podcast, Adrian Florido tackles this debate: When immigrants facing deportation seek sanctuary, should they make their stories public? Do they decide or does the church?

Sanctuary Churches: Who Controls The Story?

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President Trump hosts Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe last month at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. North Korea tested a missile during Abe's visit and guests at the club overhead the two leaders discussing the incident. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Politics

GAO Agrees To Review Costs Of Trump's Trips To Mar-A-Lago

The Government Accountability Office has agreed to review costs and security measures associated with President Trump's visits to Mar-a-Lago. Trump has spent five weekends there since taking office.

GAO Agrees To Review Costs Of Trump's Trips To Mar-A-Lago

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(From left) Renee Chaney, visitor Louisa Parker, Linda Wertheimer and Kris Mortensen, in the first All Things Considered studio in 1972. NPR hide caption

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NPR

The Two-Way - News Blog

First Episode Of 'All Things Considered' Is Headed To Library Of Congress

The NPR program's inaugural 1971 broadcast has been added to the National Recording Registry, alongside other "aural treasures" like Judy Garland's "Over the Rainbow." Take a listen to the first show!

First Episode Of 'All Things Considered' Is Headed To Library Of Congress

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