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Shifts In Habitat May Threaten Ruddy Shorebird's Survival

Guided by biologists, volunteers briefly catch, band and release some of Delaware's visiting red knots each spring to monitor the health of the species. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Maggie Starbard/NPR

Science

Shifts In Habitat May Threaten Ruddy Shorebird's Survival

To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.

New York Debates Whether Housing Counts As Health Care

Lissette Encarnacion in her apartment at The Brook, a supportive housing complex in the Bronx. hide caption

itoggle caption Natalie Fertig/WNYC

Shots - Health News

New York Debates Whether Housing Counts As Health Care WNYC

Offering a homeless person an apartment with access to a doctor and social services may be cheaper than paying for emergency room visits and jail or shelter stays. But should Medicaid help with rent?

From member station

WNYC
The Great War At 100: Music Of Conflict And Remembrance

Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein (who later became an American citizen) lost an arm in World War I. He commissioned composers including Maurice Ravel to write pieces for the left hand alone. hide caption

itoggle caption Bettmann/CORBIS

Deceptive Cadence

The Great War At 100: Music Of Conflict And Remembrance

One hundred years after the start of World War I, hear a range of pop and classical music from artists of the era. Some music reflects the war's violence, some gives solace.

Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

A worker dries coffee beans at a coffee plantation in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala, in February 2013. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Moises Castillo/AP

The Salt

Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

Central American coffee farmers are facing off against a deadly fungus that has wiped out thousands of acres of crops. Coffee companies like Starbucks are pooling money to support them in the fight.

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