Sakine Arat, right, and Mayrem Bulut are Kurdish mothers camping out between Turkish amry forces and the Kurdish PKK militants, in hopes of preventing clashes. "Mothers on both sides should be doing this," says Arat, 80. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Parallels - World News

Kurdish Activists Camp Out Between Turkey's Army And Kurdish Fighters

As an old conflict heats up again in southeastern Turkey, the activists have staked out ground on a sunburned hillside and say they're willing to risk their own lives in order to stop the fighting.

Members of the WDBJ-TV7 news staff prepare for the early newscast at the station, the morning after reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward were killed by a former colleague during a live broadcast. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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NPR Ombudsman

Gunshots And Screen Grabs: Reactions To NPR's Coverage Of The Virginia Shooting

Pictures, audio, visuals, descriptions – We consider the editorial choices in reporting on a newsroom tragedy.

German director Wim Wenders poses with his Honorary Golden Bear Award for lifetime achievement at the Berlin International Film Festival in February. John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Movie Interviews

German Filmmaker Wim Wenders Sums Up His Work In One Word

That word is "searchers." Wenders says, "If you look at the history of filmmaking, most great filmmakers actually were working on one story for all their lives."

Palm trees bend and banners rip on Canal Street as Hurricane Katrina blows through New Orleans on Aug. 29, 2005 — 10 years ago Saturday. Ted Jackson/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

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Hurricane Katrina: 10 Years Of Recovery And Reflection

3 Views On A Tragedy: Reporters Recall First Days After Katrina

When Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast, devastating regions of Louisiana and Mississippi, three of NPR's correspondents saw the storm firsthand. These are their stories.

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Shown a realistic human target — not just a silhouette like this one — shooters were more likely to pull the trigger if the target was black, according to an analysis of 42 studies. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Research News

Shooters Quicker To Pull Trigger When Target Is Black, Study Finds

A new meta-analysis of trigger bias, drawing on 42 studies, found that when asked to evaluate a threat, people tend to shoot at black targets more often than white targets — and to do so more quickly

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Donald Trump poses for a selfie with a woman wearing a "Team Trump" T-shirt on stage at the National Federation of Republican Assemblies Presidential Preference Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. Jason Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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It's All Politics

Donald Trump In 9 Quotes And 200 Seconds

Trump took his act on the road to Tennessee, where he thrilled a conservative audience with an off-the-cuff routine that bordered on stand-up comedy.

After her quarantine for Ebola had ended, Dr. Nancy Snyderman was photographed waiting to appear on a Today show segment. Peter Kramer/NBC/Getty Images hide caption

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Goats and Soda

Ebola Flashback: Nancy Snyderman's Experience Was Different From Mine

The Today show medical editor gave a new interview about her controversial quarantine. It triggered powerful memories for an NPR journalist who was in Liberia around the same time.

The Inca were innovators in agriculture as well as engineering. Terracing like this, on a steep hillside in Peru's Colca Canyon, helped them grow food. Doug McMains/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian hide caption

itoggle caption Doug McMains/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Parallels - World News

For Inca Road Builders, Extreme Terrain Was No Obstacle

A new exhibit at the National Museum of the American Indian highlights the engineering prowess of the Inca, whose great road once spanned mountains, deserts and forests in six South American countries.

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