Spider Martin's best-known photograph, Two Minute Warning, shows marchers facing a line of state troopers in Selma, Ala., moments before police beat the protesters on March 7, 1965. The day became known as Bloody Sunday. Spider Martin/Courtesy of Tracy Martin hide caption

itoggle caption Spider Martin/Courtesy of Tracy Martin

Code Switch

Photographer Helped Expose Brutality Of Selma's 'Bloody Sunday' WBHM

Some of the most iconic images of marchers being attacked by Alabama state troopers at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965 were captured by a white photojournalist who stumbled onto the historic events.

From member station

WBHM

U.S. taxpayers have poured $30 billion into funding electronic records systems in hospitals and doctors' offices since 2009. But most of those systems still can't talk to each other, which makes transfer of medical information tough. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Shots - Health News

Sharing Patient Records Is Still A Digital Dilemma For Doctors MTPR

There's good news and bad news about electronic medical records. They're now in most doctors' offices — but most doctors can't easily share them.

From member station

MTPR

One possible result in the Mighty Mini Mammals division of 2015's Mammal March Madness tournament. If the species that's seeded highest always wins its bracket, the fennec fox will leave the division and advance to the final four. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Adam Cole/NPR

Animals

Could A Quokka Beat A Numbat? Oddsmakers Say Yes

In "Mammal March Madness," you win or die. No basketball in this tournament — it's a simulated survival-of-the-fittest game set up by evolutionary biologists. The battle cry? Mammals suck ... milk!

At more than 12,000 feet above sea level, the town of San Antonio de los Cobres, Argentina, sits on volcanic bedrock, which leaches arsenic into the drinking water. Guigue/Wikimedia hide caption

itoggle caption Guigue/Wikimedia

Goats and Soda

Arsenic Antidote Hidden In Our Genes

Even at low doses, the potent poison damages organs and causes cancers. Now scientists have found a population high in the Andes Mountains that has adapted to the toxic metal over thousands of years.

load more
Back to top