Plum Island has roughly four miles of beaches” — including along this bay below the decommissioned gunnery stations of Fort Terry. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

itoggle caption Charles Lane/WSHU

Around the Nation

Care To Buy An Island Off The Hamptons? Don't Mind The Foot-And-Mouth Disease

The federal government is preparing to auction off Plum Island, a mostly undeveloped spot near some exceptionally pricy real estate. The catch? It was once used as a disease research lab.

Salman Rushdie was once the subject of death threats. Now, when asked if he can move about freely, Rushdie responds: "You have to stop asking me. ... It's been like 16 years since it's been OK." Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images

Author Interviews

Salman Rushdie: These Days, 'Everyone Is Upset All The Time'

"Everything I write upsets somebody," Rushdie tells NPR's Scott Simon. His latest book, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights, sweeps the reader into a turbulent, magical, mythological world.

The Temple of Bel in Palmyra had already sustained some damage from artillery shells in March 2014, when these columns in the temple courtyard were photographed. The ancient temple stood at a cultural crossroads, showing influences from Greco-Roman and Persian traditions, and was one of Syria's most famous archaeological sites. It was destroyed late in August of 2015. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images

Parallels - World News

As ISIS Destroys Artifacts, Could Some Antiquities Have Been Saved?

The Getty Trust's president argues objects should be spread around the world for safekeeping — which is controversial, and sometimes illegal. Protecting sites, he says, could require military action.

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When he came back from Afghanistan, Army Pfc. Brian Orolin was eager to return to his life as a father and husband. But he had trouble holding on to a sense of purpose, his wife says. StoryCorps hide caption

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The Impact of War

After Afghanistan, A Father Came Home — Then Disappeared

Army Pfc. Brian Orolin returned from Afghanistan in 2011, suffering from paranoia and headaches. Three years later, he walked out on his wife and daughters; he hasn't been seen since.

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In Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine, director Alex Gibney turns a critical lens on the Apple co-founder and his products. Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures hide caption

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All Tech Considered

New Film Asks: Were Steve Jobs' Flaws Uploaded To His Machines?

Alex Gibney's documentary joins a growing list of Steve Jobs biopics and biographies. He raises the question of whether Jobs' creations make the people who use them more like their imperfect inventor.

Stephen Van Cleef, a fictional Seneca Village resident played by Billy Eugene Jones (left), meets a New York City police officer, played by Andy Truschinski, in The People Before the Park at Premiere Stages at Kean University in Union, N.J. Mike Peters/Premiere Stages hide caption

itoggle caption Mike Peters/Premiere Stages

Theater

'What Was This?': The Story Of The Village Displaced By Central Park

The land that became New York City's Central Park was once home to Manhattan's first-known community of African-American property owners. A new play explores how eminent domain forced them out.

Thirty years after its career-defining hit "Take On Me," a-ha has a new album. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music

An A-Ha Moment To Take Into Your Weekend

The Norwegian synth-pop band a-ha releases a new album Friday, but its 1985 smash, "Take On Me," remains inescapable.

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Singer Aretha Franklin has won a temporary injunction to stop a documentary about her live album Amazing Grace from being released. The film was to premiere Friday. Express Newspapers/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Aretha Franklin Blocks Premiere Of Concert Film 'Amazing Grace'

A documentary about Franklin's famous 1972 live album Amazing Grace has suffered years of delays due to technical and legal challenges. It was to premiere Friday.

Thunderbitch's self-titled debut album is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Songs We Love

Songs We Love: Thunderbitch, 'Wild Child'

Alabama Shakes frontwoman Brittany Howard snarls, sputters and howls through a rock and roll stomper that ain't messing around.

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Mourners stand near the casket of Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Darren Goforth at Second Baptist Church in Houston, Texas, Friday. Two people who were with the deputy on the night he was killed told his family today that he wasn't alone when he died. Aaron M. Sprecher/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Aaron M. Sprecher/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Deputy Goforth Is Mourned And Buried In Houston

Lt. Roland De Los Santos said that Ryan Goforth, 5, and his father had bought matching Captain America T-shirts — and that while Ryan has his on today — "underneath his uniform, so does Darren." Goforth was shot last week while putting gas in his patrol car.

Part-time or half-day preschools pose a challenge for many working parents. Marko Poplasen/iStockphoto hide caption

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NPR Ed

Preschool And Privilege: When Early Education Hinges On Parental Flexibility

As writer Jessica Grose prepares to send her child off to school for the first time, she faces a stark reality. Preschool schedules, she says, often require extreme flexibility from working parents.

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