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A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

An analysis examining mortality among millions of Americans finds that a tiny decrease in levels of soot could save about 12,000 lives each year.

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-K.Y. (left), and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, speak to members of the media outside the West Wing of the White House on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Politics

Just 17 Percent Of Americans Approve Of Republican Senate Health Care Bill

In a new NPR-PBS NewsHour-Marist poll, 55 percent of Americans say they disapprove of the Senate GOP bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

An official at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility demonstrates how a curtain is pulled between the death chamber and witness room in 2005 at the prison in Lucasville, Ohio. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Federal Appeals Court Paves Way For Ohio To Resume Lethal Injections

It was a contentious decision that split the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges in an 8-6 vote. A lower court had halted executions. The judges focused on the effects of the sedative midazolam.

Michael Bond sits with a Paddington Bear toy in 2008. Bond died Tuesday, according to his publisher, nearly six decades after his beloved character first appeared in print. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

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Sang Tan/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Michael Bond, The 'Giant' Behind Paddington Bear, Dies At 91

"Mr. and Mrs. Brown first met Paddington on a railway platform" — and readers first met Paddington with those words in 1958. Bond, who died Tuesday, turned that bear into an unforgettable friend.

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has had several confrontations with Chinese authorities. Beck Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Beck Harlan/NPR

Arts & Life

'They Love Freedom': Ai Weiwei On His Lego Portraits Of Fellow Activists

The Chinese artist created Trace while under house arrest, and he wasn't allowed to travel to the San Francisco debut. Now, he has his passport back and was able to see it on display.

'They Love Freedom': Ai Weiwei On His Lego Portraits Of Fellow Activists

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Staff at the Secretary of State's Office inspect the damage to the new Ten Commandments monument outside the state Capitol in Little Rock, Ark., on Wednesday morning. Police say a car crashed into it less than 24 hours after it was installed. Jill Zeman Bleed/AP hide caption

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Jill Zeman Bleed/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

Arkansas' Ten Commandments Monument Lasted Less Than 24 Hours

Police say a man drove a 2016 Dodge Dart into the 6,000-pound granite slab less than a day after it was installed on the grounds of the state Capitol. The man reportedly took video as he accelerated.

During a protest in Caracas this week, an opposition activist stands near graffiti against a constituent assembly proposed by Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro to rewrite the constitution. A political and economic crisis has spawned often violent demonstrations by protesters demanding Maduro's resignation. Federico Parra /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra /AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Confusion In Venezuela After Helicopter Attack On Supreme Court

President Nicolás Maduro is calling it a terrorist attack, but there's a lot of confusion about who was behind the dramatic incident. Maduro's opponents suggest it was an inside job.

Employees at a store in Kiev, Ukraine, read a ransomware demand for $300 in bitcoin to free files encrypted by the Petya software virus. The malicious program has spread to dozens of countries. Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

'Petya' Ransomware Hits At Least 65 Countries; Microsoft Traces It To Tax Software

An updated version of the malware has the ability to worm through computer networks, gathering passwords and credentials and spreading itself.

'Petya' Ransomware Hits At Least 65 Countries; Microsoft Traces It To Tax Software

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Ethel and Julius Rosenberg are shown here at their 1951 trial in New York. They were charged and convicted of giving nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union under the 1917 Espionage Act. The law was intended for spies, but has been used by the Obama and Trump administrations to prosecute suspected national security leakers. AP hide caption

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AP

Parallels - World News

Once Reserved For Spies, Espionage Act Now Used Against Suspected Leakers

President Woodrow Wilson signed the Espionage Act to target spies during World War I. The Obama administration used it against suspected leakers, and now the Trump administration is doing the same.

Once Reserved For Spies, Espionage Act Now Used Against Suspected Leakers

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The DIYgirls team with their solar-powered tent. Courtesy of DIYgirls hide caption

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Courtesy of DIYgirls

All Tech Considered

All-Girls Teen Engineering Team Creates A Solar-Powered Tent For Homeless People

Twelve high school girls coded, soldered and sewed a tent that uses solar power to charge electronic devices, provide light and sanitize itself. The team recently presented their creation at MIT.

All-Girls Teen Engineering Team Creates A Solar-Powered Tent For Homeless People

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Calls for tort reform in regards to medical malpractice are popular on the campaign trail. But research shows that costs from medical liability make up just 2 to 2.5 percent of total health care spending in the U.S. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Shots - Health News

House GOP Bill Proposes New Limits To Medical Malpractice Awards

Kaiser Health News

The proposed legislation would limit awards for non-economic damages — such as pain and suffering — to $250,000. President Trump supports the bill, but many others across the political spectrum don't.