Adm. Michael Rogers, NSA director and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, has avoided singling out China for blame in the OPM hack, which may affect as many as 18 million federal workers. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Parallels - World News

In Data Breach, Reluctance To Point The Finger At China

Personal data of at least 18 million federal workers may have been accessed via the OPM computer system. Some officials quietly blame China; others want to avoid upsetting this major trade partner.

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During World War II, there was an American base in Liberia that was off-limits to most Liberians. According to author James Ciment, the smell of American food cooking drifted beyond the base's perimeter, giving the town of Smell No Taste its name. Abbas Dulleh/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Abbas Dulleh/AP

Goats and Soda

Yes, There Really Is A Town In Liberia Called 'Smell No Taste'

It's the place where a teenager died of Ebola this week. And, like all unusual geographic names, there's a story behind it.

"Who Gets Kissed" corn is a variety bred in Wisconsin specifically for organic farmers. It's named for an old game. At corn husking time, a lucky person who found a rare ear of corn with red kernels had the right to kiss anyone that he or she chose. Courtesy of Adrienne Shelton hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Adrienne Shelton

The Salt

Do Organic Farmers Need Special Seeds And Money To Breed Them?

Organic farmers say they need crop varieties that were bred specifically for conditions on their farms. Clif Bar & Company decided to back their cause with up to $10 million in grants.

A worker welds parts in fans for industrial ventilation systems at the Robinson Fans Inc. plant in Harmony, Pa., in February. Hourly wages in the U.S. remained unchanged last month. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Keith Srakocic/AP

Economy

So Far, So Good For The Economy. But What About The Second Half?

The Labor Department's June report showed decent job growth, with unemployment dipping to 5.3 percent. In fact, 2015's first half was fairly good. But economists see dangers lurking in the back half.

A Charleston, S.C., resident kneels in prayer in front of the Emanuel AME Church before a worship service on June 21. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Stephen B. Morton/AP

Code Switch

Coping While Black: A Season Of Traumatic News Takes A Psychological Toll

Research on the psychological effects of racism, especially on people of color, is still in the early stages. But psychologists warn that events like the Charleston shooting can cause serious stress.

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Millions more workers, who currently don't, could now qualify for overtime pay. Luciano Lozano/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Luciano Lozano/Ikon Images/Corbis

U.S.

New Rules Could Create A New Class Of Overtime Workers

The president's proposal would make 5 million more Americans eligible for overtime pay. But the changes don't mean that employers will pay more.

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Turn up the car radio and hit the highway with the newly completed All Things Considered road-trip playlist. DutchScenery/iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption DutchScenery/iStockphoto

Music

Your Road-Trip Playlist Is Ready

From more than 3,000 listener suggestions, we've whittled the mix down to 99 songs you say are perfect for long summer drives. Stream the playlist here.

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