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Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

A study of whole genome sequencing found that while many people discovered genetic variations linked to rare diseases, they didn't overreact to the news.

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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Copies of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, on sale in an Arlington, Virginia bookstore in 2000. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Book News & Features

On Harry Potter's 20th Anniversary, Listen To His NPR Debut

The first Harry Potter book came out 20 years ago today. One year later, in 1998, was the first time we mentioned the book, on All Things Considered. Here's Margot Adler's piece in its entirety.

On Harry Potter's 20th Anniversary, Listen To His NPR Debut

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Google has announced it will no longer scan users' emails to target ads. Above, the company's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., in 2015. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Google Says It Will No Longer Read Users' Emails To Sell Targeted Ads

The company says it will make the change later this year, bringing Gmail in line with its business products. But Google has already gathered a lot of data on users since it launched Gmail in 2004.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear the case on President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban targeting citizens from six predominantly Muslim countries. Brendan Smialowsk/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowsk/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

President Trump's revised travel ban can take effect in regard to foreign nationals who don't have ties to people or groups in the U.S., the Supreme Court says.

Charles Camiel looks into the camera for a facial recognition test before boarding his JetBlue flight to Aruba at Logan International Airport in Boston. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

All Tech Considered

Facial Recognition May Boost Airport Security But Raises Privacy Worries

WBUR

If you travel from Boston's Logan Airport to Aruba on JetBlue you can use your face as identification rather than a passport. Similar experiments in facial recognition are underway at other airports.

Facial Recognition May Boost Airport Security But Raises Privacy Worries

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Left to right: mothers from Namibia's Himba tribe; from Amber, India; and from Washington state. Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; Sarah Wolfe Photography/Getty hide caption

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Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; Sarah Wolfe Photography/Getty

Goats and Soda

Secrets Of Breast-Feeding From Global Moms In The Know

Many American women want to breast-feed. And try to. But only about half keep it up. It's like they've lost the instinct. One researcher thinks she's figured out why. And how to get the instinct back.

Secrets Of Breast-Feeding From Global Moms In The Know

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President Donald Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi reach to shake hands during their meeting in the Oval Office on Monday. Concerns in New Delhi have centered on whether India will remain a priority relationship for the U.S. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Parallels - World News

Trump And India's Modi Share Similarities, But A Host Of Issues Divides Them

Both leaders are pragmatic deal-makers who rose to high office by appealing to majorities who felt overlooked. But as Trump and Modi meet Monday, their competing visions may be a significant hurdle.

Trump And India's Modi Share Similarities, But A Host Of Issues Divides Them

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Martin Shkreli, the former Turing Pharmaceuticals executive, arrives for the first day of jury selection in his federal securities fraud trial Monday at U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, N.Y. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli Goes On Trial On Securities Fraud Charges

Shkreli is charged with committing a series of frauds well before he became "the most hated man in America." He's been livestreaming and spending lavishly, though according to his lawyer, he's broke.

Valerie Castile, mother of Philando Castile, listens during a November 2016 news conference in Minneapolis. On Monday, she reached a near $3 million settlement from the city of St. Anthony, Minn., over the killing of her son by a city police officer. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Philando Castile's Mother Reaches $3 Million Settlement Over Police Shooting

The city of St. Anthony, Minn., said in a statement that "no amount of money could ever replace Philando." It said the deal was reached quickly "to allow the process of healing to move forward."