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Talking Blues

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Talking Blues

Music News

Talking Blues

Talking Blues

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Talking Blues is a song form that can trace its surface roots to a recording by the Greenville Trio in April of 1926. Its lineage goes much deeper — to spirituals — and an odd combination of the religious and the profane. The talking blues have served as a vehicle for social commentary for Woodie Guthrie, Bob Dylan, and hundreds of others. Musician and researcher Stephen Wade — creator of the stage show, Banjo Dancing, and a contributor to numerous folklore journals — traces the history of the talking blues.