Picturing the Homeless, on Their Terms Gary Clark doesn't call himself a photographer. But he feels compelled to take pictures of homeless people — those "on the edge," as he puts it. His work has brought a rare brand of celebrity to people who usually live anonymously. NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports.
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Picturing the Homeless, on Their Terms

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Picturing the Homeless, on Their Terms

Picturing the Homeless, on Their Terms

Picturing the Homeless, on Their Terms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4123582/4124648" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Paul and Bobby, under the South Street Bridge in Wilkes-Barre, Penn., Nov. 10, 2003. Gary Clark hide caption

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Gary Clark

Paul, under the South Street Bridge in Wilkes-Barre, Penn., Nov. 12, 2003. Gary Clark hide caption

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Gary Clark

Memorial Scheduled

A memorial service will be held for Paul Tagney on Nov. 4:

"Reach" Drop-In Center

35 S. Franklin St

Wilkes Barre, PA 18701-1202

Gary Clark doesn't call himself a photographer. But over the past few years, he's felt compelled to take pictures of homeless people — those "on the edge," he says. His work has brought a rare brand of celebrity to people used to living anonymously in harsh conditions.

Half a million members visit Clark's Web page, "Mashuga" — Yiddish for crazy — to see the images that result. Viewers from around the world post dozens of comments for each photo, creating a running subtext.

Clark returns to his subjects over time, updating their pictures and adding bits of biography. This interplay recently took a grave turn, when Paul Tagney, one of Clark's subjects in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., was diagnosed with lung cancer.

Tagney's hospital stay and the photographs of his losing struggle against the illness raised sympathies in Wilkes-Barre that were echoed by Web visitors around the world.

Clark talks with NPR's Jennifer Ludden about creating an ongoing chronicle of lives that are often overlooked.