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Young Workers Doubt Future of Social Security

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Young Workers Doubt Future of Social Security

Young Workers Doubt Future of Social Security

Young Workers Doubt Future of Social Security

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4468625/4468777" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

St. Louis area residents Ben Kaplan, a designer and musician, and Julie Scheu, a furniture designer, acknowledge that they'll be affected by a higher retirement age. John Ydstie, NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie, NPR

President Bush has been urging action to fix what he calls a looming crisis in funding for the Social Security program. Young people have heard warnings about the system for decades.

Views on Social Security

Younger people have less faith in the Social Security system, but they are more supportive of private accounts.

In the third part of his series on how people of different generations look at Social Security, NPR's John Ydstie finds that younger workers are highly skeptical they'll get their promised benefits.

Evie Stone of NPR's National Desk produced this series.