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Literary Pilgrims Flock to Faulkner's Home

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Literary Pilgrims Flock to Faulkner's Home

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Literary Pilgrims Flock to Faulkner's Home

Literary Pilgrims Flock to Faulkner's Home

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More than 20,000 people a year visit Rowan Oak, the Greek Revival home in Oxford, Miss., of author William Faulkner (1897-1962). Corbis hide caption

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Notes detailing the plot of A Fable cover the wall at Rowan Oak. hide caption

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Notes detailing the plot of A Fable cover the wall at Rowan Oak.

Visit Rowan Oak

The home of Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner was rededicated this weekend in Oxford, Miss. Rowan Oak, which underwent a $1.3 million restoration, draws more than 20,000 literary pilgrims each year.

Visitors to Rowan Oak can see the celebrated author's office, complete with his writing desk and Underwood typewriter, where he wrote such works as A Fable.

Built in 1848, the Greek Revival house was in disrepair when Faulkner bought it in 1930.

He spent the rest of his life restoring the property and trying to pay for it by writing what many believe to be the greatest novels of American literature — mythical stories that told the truth about the real South.

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