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Papers Turn to Podcasting, the Newest of Media
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Papers Turn to Podcasting, the Newest of Media

Media

Papers Turn to Podcasting, the Newest of Media

Papers Turn to Podcasting, the Newest of Media
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Frank Burgos (left), editorial page editor of the Philadelphia Daily News, and Eric Mayberry.

Frank Burgos (left), editorial page editor of the Philadelphia Daily News, and Eric Mayberry, the advertising director, host "Philly Feed," the paper’s podcast that debuted in early May. Philadelphia Daily News hide caption

toggle caption Philadelphia Daily News
Podcasters like Ian Neligh are bringing newspapers into portable players.

For the Denver Post podcast, college students like Ian Neligh rewrite stories in the middle of the night and then record them on their home computers. Courtesy Ian Neligh hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Ian Neligh

Desperate to reach a more mobile audience, some newspapers are turning to podcasting. A growing number now offer Internet radio programs, sending stories from their pages to iPods and other players.

Newspapers have traditionally been slow to adopt new technologies, like the Internet and blogging. Tired of playing catch-up, a small number are now embracing the latest digital media. They're producing their own Internet radio shows, which are then downloaded and listened to via special subscription software called RSS.

Media analysts aren't sure whether podcasts will ever make real money. But most agree that at the early stages, revenue isn't the point; it's important for news outlets simply to be visible in a new arena, and to be prepared to cash in on it if ad money starts to flow.

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