Fats Domino, Missing 'New Orleans'

We offer a musical tribute to the Big Easy: Fats Domino's version of "Do You Know What It's Like To Miss New Orleans?" The famed singer, now 77, narrowly escaped the floodwaters with several members of his family.

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

In the 1980s, legendary R&B singer Fats Domino decided he would live out his life in New Orleans and not leave the city again. He was comfortable. He had a lovely home, and he said he didn't like the food any place else. Earlier this week, it was reported that Fats Domino was missing in New Orleans. He was later found, safe and sound. He was evacuated to Baton Rouge. He told the Associated Press, `Tell the people of New Orleans that I'm safe. I wish I was able to still be there with them, but I hope to see them soon.' We can only imagine he was singing his song, "Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans."

(Soundbite of "Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans")

Mr. FATS DOMINO: (Singing) Do you know what it means to miss New Orleans, and miss it each night and day? I know I'm not wrong, the feeling's getting stronger the longer I stay away. I miss the moss-covered vines, the tall sugar pines where mockingbirds used to sing. And I'd like to see the lazy Mississippi hurrying into spring. The moonlight on the bayou, a Creole tune that fills the air. I dream about magnolias in June and I'm wishing that I was there. Do you know what it means to miss New Orleans when that's where you left your heart? If there's something more, I miss the one I care for more than I miss New Orleans. The moonlight on the bayou, a Creole tune that fills the air. I dream about magnolias in June and now I'm wishing that I was there. Do you know what it means to miss New Orleans when that's where you left your heart? If there's something more, I'll miss the one I care for more than I miss New Orleans.

HANSEN: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Liane Hansen.

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