A Domestic Diva Talks Relish

Martha Stewart returned to television this fall with Martha and The Apprentice: Martha Stewart.

Martha Stewart returned to television this fall with Martha and The Apprentice: Martha Stewart. Shannon Stapleton/CORBIS hide caption

itoggle caption Shannon Stapleton/CORBIS

It's pink and lumpy. It's an NPR Thanksgiving tradition. And this year it's the subject of a conversation with one of the most famous entrepreneurs in the world.

Grind up some cranberries and onions, mix in a few more unanticipated ingredients, and freeze overnight. The next morning, you’ll have a dish full of the famous, albeit bubblegum-colored, Mama Stamberg's Cranberry Relish.

Susan Stamberg has been sharing her mother-in-law's relish recipe with listeners since the network began broadcasting in 1971. This year, Stamberg takes the opportunity to talk with homemaker and businesswoman extraordinaire Martha Stewart.

Stewart is busy trying to rekindle her career after serving five months in prison for lying to federal investigators about a stock sale. But she found time to talk turkey... or relish, brussels sprouts and pumpkin gratin, to be exact.

MAMA STAMBERG'S CRANBERRY RELISH

2 cups whole raw cranberries, washed

1 small onion

3/4 cup sour cream

1/2 cup sugar

2 T. horseradish from a jar (red is a bit milder than white)

1-Grind the raw berries and onion together. (I use an old-fashioned meat grinder. I'm sure there's a setting on the food processor that will give you a chunky grind — NOT a puree)

2-Add everything else and mix.

3-Put in a plastic container and freeze.

Early Thanksgiving morning, move it from freezer to refrigerator compartment to thaw. (It should still have some little icy slivers left.)

The relish will be thick, creamy, and shocking pink (OK, Pepto Bismol pink). Tangy taste that cuts through and perks up the turkey and gravy. Also good on next-day turkey sandwiches. And with roast beef!

Makes 1-1/2 pints.

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