Sleuthing for Rock Art in New Mexico

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Mogollon-style petroglyphs in Alamo Canyon. i

Mogollon-style petroglyphs in Alamo Canyon. Anthony Howell hide caption

itoggle caption Anthony Howell
Mogollon-style petroglyphs in Alamo Canyon.

Mogollon-style petroglyphs in Alamo Canyon.

Anthony Howell

Some anthropologists now believe that more human beings lived in Southwest New Mexico 1,000 years ago than live there today.

How do they know? Because the region is covered with thousands of archaeological sites. Some areas are positively littered with rock art and artifacts from long-gone ancient cultures.

Reporter Doug Fine went on a trek through the desert back country with a local man who sleuths out hidden "rock art" sites.

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