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A Dark Journey to the North Pole

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A Dark Journey to the North Pole

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A Dark Journey to the North Pole

A Dark Journey to the North Pole

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Mike Horn, during his previously completed two-year, 12,400-mile circumnavigation of the Arctic Ocean. Sebastian Devenish/Courtesy National Geographic Adventure hide caption

toggle caption Sebastian Devenish/Courtesy National Geographic Adventure

Mike Horn, during his previously completed two-year, 12,400-mile circumnavigation of the Arctic Ocean.

Sebastian Devenish/Courtesy National Geographic Adventure

Borge Ousland swims during a solo expedition of the Arctic in 2001. Borge Ousland hide caption

toggle caption Borge Ousland

Borge Ousland swims during a solo expedition of the Arctic in 2001.

Borge Ousland

The two explorers hope to reach the North Pole in about 60 days. mikehorn.com hide caption

toggle caption mikehorn.com

The two explorers hope to reach the North Pole in about 60 days.

mikehorn.com

This Sunday, two of the world's top solo explorers will attempt to do what no one has ever done: travel 620 miles on an unsupported mission to the North Pole in the total darkness of Arctic winter.

On foot.

No one has reached the North Pole during the brutal months of eternal night with no airdrops of food and no pre-arranged rest stops.

Borge Ousland of Norway and Mike Horn of South Africa will depart Cape Arktichesky in Western Siberia, and will make their way to the pole in 10-mile stretches per day. The men, who have been to the North Pole before, will be dragging more than 300 pounds each of food, fuel, and supplies on sleds. And they won't have the help of dogs either.

Horn, 39, and Ousland, 43, join us by phone from Norilsk, Siberia, to discuss their upcoming journey.

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