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A Backyard Predator: The Cicada-Killer

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A Backyard Predator: The Cicada-Killer

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A Backyard Predator: The Cicada-Killer

A Backyard Predator: The Cicada-Killer

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A male cicada-killer perches on Chuck Holliday's finger.

A male cicada-killer perches on Chuck Holliday's finger. Chuck Holliday hide caption

toggle caption Chuck Holliday

Bugging You for a Second

If you have any cicada-killers or their victims in your backyard, Chuck Holliday wants your help.

In some backyards, a killer lurks: the cicada-killer wasp. The wasp stings its prey and seals the cicada into a hole, then lays an egg with it. The wasp's egg hatches, and presto: Killer Jr.'s food is taken care of for the duration.

Chuck Holliday, a biology professor at Lafayette College, is studying cicada-killers and is looking for samples in an attempt to determine the distributions of four species in the Western Hemisphere. The wasps can be found in Florida and the Caribbean, parts of the western United States and Mexico, and parts of the U.S. East and Midwest.

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