Contest Winners: NPR Listeners Know News, Crafts

Contest Winners

Stephen Colbert Ornament

What better way to celebrate the year than with a dose of truthiness? Click "View Gallery" to see our runners-up. Julie Jackson hide caption

itoggle caption Julie Jackson
Menorah i i

This menorah commemorates two miracles: the oil that lasted eight days so long ago, the gas prices that didn't hit $5 a gallon in 2006. Shirley Short hide caption

itoggle caption Shirley Short
Menorah

This menorah commemorates two miracles: the oil that lasted eight days so long ago, the gas prices that didn't hit $5 a gallon in 2006.

Shirley Short

Julie Jackson's Subversive Cross Stitch Web site (warning: graphic language)

Most end-of-the-year recaps include a plethora of notable news stories. Five for Friday's recap is much easier to digest: It consists of 2006-themed ornaments and menorahs submitted for NPR's first craft contest, from a bulb wrapped in telephone records (we're talking about you, Hewlett Packard) to a candlebrum honoring the eight planets (with apologies to poor, demoted Pluto).

We received photos of more than 100 handmade entries — and a few Photoshopped submissions as well.

And then the difficult job of judging began. Rabbi Jack Moline, Carla Sinclair of Craft Magazine, Phillip Torrine of Make Magazine, and our trusty npr.org staff all felt that two entries really stood out: Shirley Short's "Rising Oil Prices" menorah was both playful and poignant (and a reminder of the year when $2 gas suddenly seemed like a bargain). And Julie Jackson's "Truthiness" ornament paid homage to what Merriam Webster has dubbed the "word of the year." We'd like to thank everyone for entering. You can see what our judges had to say about the winners and the runners-up in our photo gallery.

Marc Silver is an editor at npr.org and Melody Joy Kramer is a Kroc Fellow at NPR.

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