New Orleans R&B Legend Allen Toussaint Many of the rhythms of early rock 'n' roll came out of New Orleans — and Allen Toussaint has been one of the most important figures there since the '50s.
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New Orleans R&B Legend Allen Toussaint

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New Orleans R&B Legend Allen Toussaint

New Orleans R&B Legend Allen Toussaint

New Orleans R&B Legend Allen Toussaint

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Many of the rhythms of early rock 'n' roll came out of New Orleans — and Allen Toussaint has been one of the most important figures there since the '50s. He's been an arranger, songwriter, pianist and producer; he wrote and produced for Aaron Neville, Irma Thomas and Benny Spelman, and his songs "Mother-in-Law" and "Working in a Coal Mine" became national hits.

Toussaint wrote the Poynter Sisters hit "Yes We Can" and the Robert Palmer hit "Sneakin' Sally Through the Alley," and his New Orleans recording studio has provided tracking for the likes of Paul McCartney and New Edition. This interview originally aired on Jan. 6, 1988.