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Dewey Hughes Remembers Shock Jock Petey Greene

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Dewey Hughes Remembers Shock Jock Petey Greene

Arts & Life

Dewey Hughes Remembers Shock Jock Petey Greene

Dewey Hughes Remembers Shock Jock Petey Greene

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/100450783/100450773" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Dewey Hughes arrives to the opening night screening of the film "Talk to Me" in June 2007. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Before Don Imus and Howard Stern, Petey Greene rocked the radio airwaves.

Greene was a legendary shock jock and TV talk show host, but to black residents of Washington, D.C., he was much more: He was the voice of the African-American community.

A new documentary on the life of the charismatic broadcaster and community activist premiered this month on PBS. It's titled Adjust Your Color: The Truth of Petey Greene.

For more, Tony Cox speaks with Dewey Hughes, Greene's longtime friend and manager.