Photos: Haiti One Month After The Quake

  • Women participate in a morning prayer service Feb. 14 in the Champ de Mars square. Haiti's three-day Carnival, a national holiday, was called off and replaced with a period of mourning one month after the quake.
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    Women participate in a morning prayer service Feb. 14 in the Champ de Mars square. Haiti's three-day Carnival, a national holiday, was called off and replaced with a period of mourning one month after the quake.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR/NPR
  • Haitians pray outside of the collapsed Sacre Coeur church in Port-au-Prince. The three-day mourning period included prayer, song and a moment of silence at the time of the quake.
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    Haitians pray outside of the collapsed Sacre Coeur church in Port-au-Prince. The three-day mourning period included prayer, song and a moment of silence at the time of the quake.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • A woman cries during a prayer for the people of Haiti on Feb. 14 in downtown Port-au-Prince.
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    A woman cries during a prayer for the people of Haiti on Feb. 14 in downtown Port-au-Prince.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Hundreds of thousands of Haitians gathered around the collapsed  National Palace on Feb. 12, 2010, for a rally of mourning and remembrance one month after the earthquake.
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    Hundreds of thousands of Haitians gathered around the collapsed National Palace on Feb. 12, 2010, for a rally of mourning and remembrance one month after the earthquake.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • A wide view of the rally around the National Palace, home of Haiti's president, in Port-au-Prince.
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    A wide view of the rally around the National Palace, home of Haiti's president, in Port-au-Prince.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Haitians, now further displaced by floodwaters from the season's first major rain, spontaneously demonstrated on Feb. 11 to demand shelter, water and food.
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    Haitians, now further displaced by floodwaters from the season's first major rain, spontaneously demonstrated on Feb. 11 to demand shelter, water and food.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Many Haitians spend the entire day waiting in lines for food. Since the immediate aftermath of the quake, the distribution system has become more organized. But owing to logistical shortcomings there is still a severe shortage of food.
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    Many Haitians spend the entire day waiting in lines for food. Since the immediate aftermath of the quake, the distribution system has become more organized. But owing to logistical shortcomings there is still a severe shortage of food.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Bags of rice donated by the United States are thrown off a truck and handed out to women standing in a food distribution line at the main soccer stadium in Port-au-Prince.
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    Bags of rice donated by the United States are thrown off a truck and handed out to women standing in a food distribution line at the main soccer stadium in Port-au-Prince.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • In a futile attempt, ten-year-old Alex Mertulus scoops water with a small bucket outside of his tent after heavy rains flooded the Mais Gate Camp near Port-au-Prince's international airport. Alex's mother, Magarette Brutus, lost her husband and home in the quake and is living in the camps with her son.
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    In a futile attempt, ten-year-old Alex Mertulus scoops water with a small bucket outside of his tent after heavy rains flooded the Mais Gate Camp near Port-au-Prince's international airport. Alex's mother, Magarette Brutus, lost her husband and home in the quake and is living in the camps with her son.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • After heavy rains and flooding, Haitians in a displacement camp were forced to move to another area. The rainy season begins in March, which will cause a new set of logistical problems.
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    After heavy rains and flooding, Haitians in a displacement camp were forced to move to another area. The rainy season begins in March, which will cause a new set of logistical problems.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Water contaminated with human waste floods a soccer stadium in Port-au-Prince. Cinder blocks provide a pathway across the field to a canal that Haitians use to draw water for cooking.
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    Water contaminated with human waste floods a soccer stadium in Port-au-Prince. Cinder blocks provide a pathway across the field to a canal that Haitians use to draw water for cooking.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • A man yells in the face of police officers as a group of men protest the living conditions of the refugee camps in Port-au-Prince.
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    A man yells in the face of police officers as a group of men protest the living conditions of the refugee camps in Port-au-Prince.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • On the site of the Universite St. Gerard, a small college in Port-au-Prince, the excavation for bodies continues. As NPR's David Gilkey put it, they are "barely scratching the surface." One man hands over the school ID of a missing person.
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    On the site of the Universite St. Gerard, a small college in Port-au-Prince, the excavation for bodies continues. As NPR's David Gilkey put it, they are "barely scratching the surface." One man hands over the school ID of a missing person.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Scavenging and looting for goods continues. Although very little of value remains in the rubble, many continue to comb the wreckage throughout the day to pass the time.
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    Scavenging and looting for goods continues. Although very little of value remains in the rubble, many continue to comb the wreckage throughout the day to pass the time.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Scavengers scramble for scrap metal as a dump truck empties its load at Jeremy Wharf near Port-au-Prince. City authorities are still unsure about where they will put the waste, adding to the logistical problems overwhelming Haiti after the earthquake.
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    Scavengers scramble for scrap metal as a dump truck empties its load at Jeremy Wharf near Port-au-Prince. City authorities are still unsure about where they will put the waste, adding to the logistical problems overwhelming Haiti after the earthquake.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR
  • Small industries have emerged in the aftermath of the quake, such as the scavenging and resale of steel. Here, a man carries pills and medicine for sale. Although things have calmed in Port-au-Prince, recovery is just as daunting as it was a month ago.
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    Small industries have emerged in the aftermath of the quake, such as the scavenging and resale of steel. Here, a man carries pills and medicine for sale. Although things have calmed in Port-au-Prince, recovery is just as daunting as it was a month ago.
    Photos by David Gilkey/NPR

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