Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz 30th Anniversary Show

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57 min 44 sec
 
Piano Jazz Interactive i i
Piano Jazz Interactive

Set List

"All the Things You Are" (J. Kern, O. Hammerstein)

With Hank Jones, "Falling In Love With Love" (R. Rodgers, L. Hart)

With Oscar Peterson, "Polka Dots and Moonbeams'" (J. Van Heusen, J. Burke)

With Ray Charles, “Things Ain't What They Used To Be" (M. Ellington)

"There'll Be Other Times" (M. McPartland)

With Diana Krall, "Only Trust Your Heart" (B. Carter, S. Cahn)

"For All We Know" (S. Lewis, J. F. Coots)

With Bill Crow and Joe Morello, "I Hear Music" (F. Loesser, B. Lane)

On this week's Piano Jazz, Marian McPartland's longtime friend Murray Horwitz sits in the host's chair to share some of his favorite moments from the past 30 years of the program. The multifaceted Horwitz has served as Vice President of Cultural Programming at NPR, where he started the hit quiz show, Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me. He co-hosted NPR's Basic Jazz Record Library with A.B. Spellman and serves as the movie maven for NPR's Talk Of the Nation. Horwitz is the co-author of the Tony Award winning musical Ain't Misbehavin', a lyricist whose credits include popular songs for John Harbison's opera, The Great Gatsby, and the writer of a pops concert based on the music of George and Ira Gershwin. His new play RFK: The Journey to Justice (written with Jonathan Estrin) toured the U.S. this year, and will be heard on public radio stations next January. Murray has also served as the director of the American Film Institute's Silver Theatre and Cultural Center.

On this episode, Horwitz explores the many sides of Piano Jazz's gracious host Marian McPartland: interviewer, storyteller, bandleader, improviser, composer, accompanist, loving wife and musical partner, supporter of brilliant new talent, voracious polyglot of pianistic styles and interpreter of the Great American Songbook.

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