Of Montreal In Concert

Hear Of Montreal In Concert

1 hr 50 min 39 sec
 
Of Montreal Live i i

Strange creatures take the stage in Of Montreal's spectacular performance at the 9:30 Club, in Washington, D.C. Shantel Mitchell hide caption

itoggle caption Shantel Mitchell
Of Montreal Live

Strange creatures take the stage in Of Montreal's spectacular performance at the 9:30 Club, in Washington, D.C.

Shantel Mitchell

Everything about Of Montreal is a spectacle, and the band's live performances are no exception. Led by frenetic frontman Kevin Barnes, Of Montreal stages fantastically theatrical concerts with elaborate sets, multiple costume changes and synchronized dancing, all driven by breathlessly unpredictable songs. Of Montreal is on tour for its latest album, False Priest, and stops by Washington, D.C. for a full concert, webcast live on NPR Music Tuesday, Sept. 14. The performance, from the 9:30 Club, will begin streaming online at approximately 8 p.m. ET, with an opening set by R&B singer Janelle Monae.

Of Montreal has largely been a one-man project since Barnes began releasing his trademark mix of wacky, euphoric pop and trippy psychedelic soundscapes in the mid-'90s. He released nearly an album a year between 1997 and 2008, writing, performing and recording all the parts at his home studio in Athens, Ga. But for False Priest, Barnes worked in an outside studio with producer Jon Brion at the helm. Though the production is a little crisper, the album still includes the epic orchestrations and multilayered falsetto harmonies for which Barnes is known.

R&B singer Janelle Monae, who appears on False Priest, will open the live webcast from Washington, D.C. Kevin Barnes co-produced Monae's 2010 studio debut The ArchAndroid (Suites I and II), along with rapper and hip-hop producer Big Boi and Sean "Diddy" Combs. ArchAndroid has been almost universally praised for its epic blend of hip-hop, soul, cabaret, glam rock, classical and electronica.

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