Assessing The BP Spill's Impact BP's ruptured Macondo well spewed millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon explosion in April, 2010. Months after the explosion, scientists are developing a clearer picture of the impact on the Gulf and its ecosystem. In a special broadcast, Talk of the Nation and National Geographic explain what we know about the state of the Gulf today.
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Assessing The BP Spill's Impact

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Assessing The BP Spill's Impact

Assessing The BP Spill's Impact

Assessing The BP Spill's Impact

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On April 20, 2010, a geyser of seawater, mud and methane gas exploded on the Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling platform off the Gulf of Mexico.

The platform sank 5,000 feet to the bottom of the Gulf, and for 87 days, BP's Macondo well spewed millions of gallons of oil and natural gas into the ocean.

Scientists continue working to assess the spill's impact on the Gulf – a diverse ecosystem of wetlands, marshes and a complex chain of sea life.

Watch a video detailing the controversial decision to use dispersants in the Gulf, from the National Geographic special, 'Explorer: Can The Gulf Survive?'

In a special broadcast in front of a live audience, Talk of the Nation and National Geographic teamed up to explore the reach and impact of the spill in the Gulf.

Joel Bourne, contributing writer for National Geographic Magazine, NPR science correspondent Richard Harris and Ian MacDonald, professor of biological oceanography at Florida State University, share an update on the state of the Gulf – and what scientists have yet to learn about the impact of the BP spill.