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Fruit Bats And Deolinda On Mountain Stage

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Fruit Bats And Deolinda On Mountain Stage

Fruit Bats And Deolinda On Mountain Stage

Fruit Bats And Deolinda On Mountain Stage

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Watch The Interview From Backstage At Mountain Stage

Fruit Bats' Set List

  • "Tegucigalpa" (not included in broadcast)
  • "The Ruminant Band"
  • "Flamingo"
  • "My Unusual Friend"

Deolinda's Set List

  • "Um Contra O Outro"
  • "Fado Toninho"
  • "Clandestino"
  • "Mal Por Mal"
  • "Fado Nao E Mau"

Originally from Chicago, Fruit Bats are led by folk pop songwriter Eric D. Johnson, who also works as a member of The Shins. Johnson was a guitar and banjo instructor at Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music and began Fruit Bats as an ambitious 4-track solo project. A friend heard the songs and a debut was released on an independent Chicago label. Ten years in, Fruit Bats' members include bassist Chris Sherman, keyboard player Ron Lewis, drummer Graeme Gibson and guitarist Sam Wagster.

In its first appearance on Mountain Stage (and in West Virginia), Fruit Bats perform songs from its fourth record, The Ruminant Band, including "Tegucigalpa," which wasn't heard on the radio broadcast.

Platinum-selling band Deolinda hails from Portugal. Lead singer Ana Bacalhau teamed with guitarist Pedro da Silva Martins along with guitarist Luis Jose Martins and acoustic bass player Ze Pedro Leitao to form the group in 2006. Da Silva Martins wrote the songs for the band's debut album, Cancao ao Lado, based on a character he created, also named Deolinda. The group's most recent release is called Dois Selos E Um Carimbo.

This Mountain Stage performance was originally published on Oct 29, 2010.

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