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Museum's Latest Find: Love Letter From John Brown

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Museum's Latest Find: Love Letter From John Brown

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Museum's Latest Find: Love Letter From John Brown

Museum's Latest Find: Love Letter From John Brown

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/131145982/131146843" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The National Museum of African-American History and Culture is scheduled to open its doors on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., in 2015. Over the past several months, Weekend All Things Considered has been given exclusive sneak peeks of the collection being built for the new museum.

Among the items founding director Lonnie Bunch has shared with host Guy Raz — Michael Jackson's fedora and Harriet Tubman's personal hymnal.

On a visit with Bunch last week, the first thing he pulled out was a letter written in 1858. Radical abolitionist John Brown wrote it to his wife while he was a fugitive from the law — and he happened to be visiting Frederick Douglass at his home in Rochester, N.Y.