Hanukkah Lights 2010

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Robin Skyler Tell via Flickr

Hanukkah Lights for 2010 presents an all-new collection of specially commissioned stories — in which a youthful experiment mends a torn family; a troubled man's search for meaning returns him to a love he feared was lost; and mysterious, childhood insights bind the legends and miracles of two, ancient cultures — all read by Susan Stamberg and Murray Horwitz, in the 20th anniversary edition of this annual, holiday favorite.


"Geek Week" By Rebecca O'Connell

At a high school science camp, Kevin recognizes someone he knows should be part of his life, yet has never even met before — and sets out to make things right. O'Connell is also the author of Penina Levine is a Potato Pancake and Penina Levine is a Hard-Boiled Egg.  She lives in Pittsburgh.


"Legacy" by Lev Raphael

The author reflects on a series of miracles, from a time of historic darkness, that brought his family to life. Raphael also wrote the novel The German Money and the story collection Secret Anniversaries of the Heart. His latest book, My Germany, explores the complex role that Germany has played in his family's life, and in his life and career.


"Finding Golda" by Margot Singer

At work in East Jerusalem, a middle-aged contractor loses a beloved family pet.  As he begins to search, Yehuda hopes he hasn't lost his way in life, as well. Singer is the author of The Pale of Settlement, winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction and the 2008 Reform Judaism Prize. She teaches at Denison University, in Granville, Ohio.


"Moon Landing" by Shira Nayman

As man first reaches the lunar surface, two young girls find an emotional common bond, through the age-old miracles of their vastly differing cultures. Nayman, who also works as a clinical psychologist, is the author of Awake in the Dark, a novella and stories; and The Listener, a novel. She teaches at Columbia University.

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