Dylan LeBlanc: Young At Heart

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Dylan LeBlanc i

Dylan LeBlanc recently performed a brief set at New York City's WFUV. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Dylan LeBlanc

Dylan LeBlanc recently performed a brief set at New York City's WFUV.

courtesy of the artist

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Although Dylan LeBlanc just recently released his debut album, Pauper's Field, he's by no means new to the game.  Dylan grew up surrounded by music his whole life.  As the son of a Muscle Shoals session player, he's spent more time in recording studios than in school.  In fact, the young singer-songwriter considers his time spent hanging around Fame Studios in Alabama to be his true education.

Watching his dad and other musicians (such as legendary organist Spooner Oldham) sit in a circle and work songs out made a profound impact on the younger LeBlanc. Naturally, being a musician seemed like the only course for him.  He picked up the guitar at age 7 and started writing songs as soon as he reached double digits. As many of us do, he used music as a respite from the more difficult times in his life.

The soft-spoken Southern gentleman shrugs off that early material as being pretty bad, but these days he's feeling more confident in his work; enough so that he even showed his long-time idol, Emmylou Harris, one of his songs.  She graces Pauper’s Field with her haunting vocals in "If The Creek Don't Rise," and in our interview, LeBlanc shares his experiences of being starstruck by Harris. He also tells a tale or two about his family that sound as if they're taken straight out of a John Wayne Western.

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