Barnes And Borders? Bookstore Merger Proposed

An influential investor in the Borders bookstore chain is proposing a takeover of rival Barnes and Noble. Potential names for a merged bookstore chain include: Barnes and Borders, Noble Borders, BB&N — although there's already a private school by that name, says James McQuivey, a media business analyst at Forrester Research. Or a new company could start with a clean page. "Just call it Libro or something very ... friendly," he says.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

An influential investor in the bookstore chain Borders is proposing that his company take over the rival Barnes and Noble. So our last word in business today is Barnes and Borders, or Noble Borders or BB&N. All could be possible names for a merged bookstore chain.

Mr. JAMES MCQUIVEY (Media Business Analyst, Forrester Research): Unfortunately, there's already a private school with the BB&N name.

INSKEEP: James McQuivey is a media business analyst at Forrester Research.

Mr. MCQUIVEY: That does sound very much like a bank, though, and maybe that'll be their new business model. They already have your credit card on file.

(Soundbite of laughter)

INSKEEP: Or the new company could start with a clean page.

Mr. MCQUIVEY: And just call it Libro, or something very friendly.

INSKEEP: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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