He Might Need A Cigarette, But Obama Isn't Smoking

Talk about stress: your popularity ratings are dipping, pundits pound you from the left and the right, you get shellacked in midterm elections, the unemployment rate stalls near 10 percent. Then one day, a friend elbows you in the chops under the basket, and you need so many stitches that you can't pronounce "superfluous." Yet, as host Scott Simon notes, President Obama has apparently not smoked a cigarette in nine months.

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

Talk about stress. Your popularity ratings are dipping, pundits pound you from the left and the right, you get shellacked in midterm elections, the unemployment rate stalls near 10 percent. Then one day a friend elbows you in the chops, under the basket, and you need so many stitches that you can't pronounce superfluous.

Is this really the best time to try to give up smoking? This week, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs said he hadn't seen President Obama smoking in probably nine months. And just in time. This week a new Surgeon General's report detailed the damage of inhaling even the smoke from one cigarette. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin says inhaling even the smallest amount of tobacco smoke can damage your DNA, which can lead to cancer.

The next time the president of some harangue from the floor of the Congress, he might want to reach for a stick of gum. Sugarless.

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