Photos: Election Unrest In Haiti

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    U.N. police make their way through the streets on Thursday in Petionville, a suburb of Port-au Prince. Supporters of Michel Martelly, Sweet Mickey" took to the streets of Haiti's capital for a third day to contest election results. Haitian election officials announced late Tuesday that two candidates — government protege Jude Celestin and former first lady Mirlande Manigat — would advance to a runoff.
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    Michel "Sweet Mickey" Martelly greets his supporters at his home in Petionville. A popular singer in Haiti, Martelly failed to qualify for the runoff, placing third after Manigat and Celestin.
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    Protestors block the road in Petionville, a suburb of Port-au-Prince. Thousands of protesters demonstrated across Haiti on Wednesday over what they claim are rigged results of the Nov. 28 presidential election.
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    Supporters of Michel Martelly run from tear gas being fired by UN soldiers.
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    Supporters of Michel Martelly run from tear gas fired by U.N. soldiers.
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    A boy looks down a ravaged street in Port-au-Prince.
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    Martelly supporters take to the streets, walking past a smashed billboard of Manigat.
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    Martelly supporters confront Brazilian U.N. soldiers in Port-au Prince.
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    The results were announced Tuesday evening after hours of delays and were questioned both in Haiti and abroad. The post-election unrest means more upheaval in a poor country suffering a cholera epidemic and still recovering from the devastating Jan. 12 earthquake, which killed more than 200,000 people.
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    Martelly supporters run from tear gas fired from an election office in Port-au Prince on Wednesday. On Tuesday night, demonstrators set up flaming barricades near a restaurant in Petionville, a suburb of the capital where the tallies were announced, and threw rocks at passersby.
    David Gilkey/NPR
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    Black smoke from burning barricades was in the air Wednesday in areas where Martelly's support is strongest, including Petionville and Delmas. Thousands were on the streets chanting, "Micky," and singing political songs.
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    Protesters block the streets in Petionville on Wednesday. Martelly supporters claim that the Nov. 28 ballot was rigged to push the unpopular Celestin into the runoff election.
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    The election results are preliminary, "so the candidates have 72 hours to protest the results; we are expecting that Martelly will do that," noted NPR's Jason Beaubien.
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    The appeals period runs through Friday, with final results expected to be announced around Dec. 20. The runoff is scheduled for Jan. 16.
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    Supporters carry a giant poster of Martelly in a massive demonstration. Officials acknowledged that the election was imperfect, with hundreds of thousands of earthquake dead still registered and many living voters waiting for ID cards.
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    U.N. peacekeepers and the joint Organization of American States-Caribbean Community observer mission say the election problems do not invalidate the vote. Here, protesters help an injured man who was hit in the head with a rock.
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    A Haitian man takes a photo of the destruction with his cell phone. Protests began as soon as the election news was announced.
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News of Haiti's election runoff has prompted furious backers of eliminated candidates to set fires and stage angry protests across the country.

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