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Whitney Museum Tries New Approach To Fundraising

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Whitney Museum Tries New Approach To Fundraising

Business

Whitney Museum Tries New Approach To Fundraising

Whitney Museum Tries New Approach To Fundraising

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/132358544/132358590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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New York's Whitney Museum of American Art is in the midst of a fund drive. Instead of just asking for money, the museum is trying something new. It's a video game called Clickistan. For those who complete the game, there's a payoff of sorts. It asks for donations for the Whitney, in amounts ranging from $10 to $10,000.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Today's last word in business is a new way to raise money.

New York's Whitney Museum of American Art is in the midst of a fund drive. Instead of just asking for money, the museum is trying something new.

(Soundbite of video game, "Clickistan")

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

It's a video game called "Clickistan." The avant-garde game was created by a duo of artists none as ubermorgan.com. The game mostly involves clicking around at random and answering bizarre surveys.

WERTHEIMER: For those who complete the game, there's a payoff of sorts. It asks for donations for the Whitney, in amounts ranging from $10 to $10,000.

The museum told The Wall Street Journal that "Clickistan" has gotten 15,000 hits so far. It's even pulled in a few donations.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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