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Pork-Belly Market May Go Belly-Up
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Pork-Belly Market May Go Belly-Up

Business

Pork-Belly Market May Go Belly-Up

Pork-Belly Market May Go Belly-Up
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Pork-belly contracts have been traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange since 1961. But The Wall Street Journal reports the pork-belly market is in danger of becoming extinct. Last month, the exchange traded just six pork-belly contracts.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Today's last word in business is disappearing pork.

Pork-belly contracts have been traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange since 1961. But The Wall Street Journal reports that the pork-belly market is in danger of going belly up. Last month, the exchange traded just six pork-belly contracts.

In case you're wondering, a pork-belly is the frozen slab of meat that bacon comes from. Farmers sell their pork bellies far in advance to lock in prices. So why is the pork-belly contract dying out? Well, it's not that we're giving up bacon. But now we eat it year-round so there is less need for futures contract.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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