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A Postcard From New York's Winter Wonderland

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A Postcard From New York's Winter Wonderland

Around the Nation

A Postcard From New York's Winter Wonderland

A Postcard From New York's Winter Wonderland

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It was another day of digging for people in New York City. Even the procrastinators were out in the streets freeing cars and sidewalks from the drifts. Reporter Kaomi Goetz found people hard at work in Brooklyn — some enjoying the camaraderie, and some already weary of the whole adventure.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

You can only spend so long online and New Yorkers who sat out the blizzard at home were out on the streets today trying to reclaim their lives and their cars. Kaomi Goetz reports from Brooklyn.

KAOMI GOETZ: Laura King(ph) and her boyfriend were shoveling out their car on a busy street. King is from upstate New York and didn't mind the snow, but she was under a time crunch.

Ms. LAURA KING: The whole reason the car is trapped is from the plows and the whole reason I'm digging it out is because it's a rental. If it was my car, I would just be leaving it until it melted. But it's due yesterday so I have to get it out.

GOETZ: The rental car company even gave her a free day because it was also snowed in. And that's how people have been handling the piles of snow. No mail, okay. No trains, okay. But as the rest of the city comes back to life, Brooklyn-ites were still trying to come to terms. Josh Willoughs(ph) braved the streets and thought he had it made in his Subaru until he hit an intersection dumped with snow.

Mr. JOSH WILLOUGHS: I'm from Memphis, Tennessee, so I'm not - I've been here for a decade or so, so I'm used to this. I wouldn't have done this except I'm going to Park Slope to help a 73-year-old woman who needs to get around.

GOETZ: Oh, otherwise you would have stayed home yourself.

Mr. WILLOUGHS: That's right.

GOETZ: Susan Heinbinder(ph) was braving the snow obstacle course with her two young children. She says the blizzard brought people together.

Ms. SUSAN HEINBINDER: That collective sense of working together to make things easier and, I don't know, it's nice. It's nice to feel like you live in a small town sometimes.

GOETZ: The slow response to clearing many of Brooklyn's streets was starting to frustrate a lot of people. Cars, snowplows and tow trucks were left abandoned in the middle of streets. Sullen Miller(ph) is on a maintenance crew for a company that provides housing for disadvantaged people. He's been working long hours in the snow.

Mr. SULLEN MILLER: And the streets of Manhattan, Harlem, uptown - and the streets are clear. The side streets, the main streets, everything is clear. Alleyways, all that. But when you come to Brooklyn, oh, my God.

GOETZ: The effort to clean those streets will continue through the night.

For NPR News, I'm Kaomi Goetz in Brooklyn.

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