Calif. To Ban Sale Of 100-Watt Incandescent Bulbs

The 100-watt incandescent light bulb will no longer be available for sale in California starting Saturday. The state is implementing new federal energy efficiency standards a year before other states.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

[POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: One-hundred watt incandescent bulbs can still be sold in California, but new energy efficiency standards require that the bulbs use less energy than old 100-watt bulbs. Any old bulbs remaining on store shelves can still be sold.]

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Todays last word in business is lights out.

At least here in California, where the 100-watt incandescent light bulb will no longer be available for sale. Thats due to the new federal energy efficiency standards. As it does so often, California is leading the way. It will be a year before the rest of the country follows suit.

Coincidentally, it was on New Year's Eve, in 1879, that Thomas Edison first demonstrated his newfangled incandescent light bulb to the public.

And thats the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne, and a very Happy New Year to you all.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.