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Intern: 'I Ran Toward The Congresswoman'

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Intern: 'I Ran Toward The Congresswoman'

Intern: 'I Ran Toward The Congresswoman'

Intern: 'I Ran Toward The Congresswoman'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/132797775/132797865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Daniel Hernandez walks across the lawn outside University Hospital in Tucson on Sunday. Prior to his current internship he worked on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' 2008 campaign. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Daniel Hernandez walks across the lawn outside University Hospital in Tucson on Sunday. Prior to his current internship he worked on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' 2008 campaign.

Matt York/AP

Daniel Hernandez, 20, is a junior at the University of Arizona with limited training in first aid and triage. Saturday was his fifth day as an intern in Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' office.

I came in at about 9:15 and I was assigned to help staff this event as an intern. I helped set up. At about 10 a.m. the event started. A few minutes later we heard gunshots. I then ran toward the congresswoman and those who I assumed would likely be injured.

The first thing I started to do was to try and check for pulses as well as to see who was still breathing. I got to do that for two or three people before I actually realized that the congresswoman had been one of the people who had been hit. When I realized that congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords had been hit, she became my top priority because she had not only been hit with a bullet but she had also been hit in the head.

I didn't notice any other injuries but I did notice that the position in which she was in was one where there was some danger of possible asphyxiation from the blood loss. So the first thing I did was to pick her up and prop her up against my chest to make sure that she could breathe properly. Once I was sure that she was able to breathe properly and wouldn't asphyxiate, the next thing I did was to apply pressure to her wound to make sure that we could stem the blood loss.

He did, and she survived.