More Junk Mail May End Up In Your Mail Box

The U.S. Postal Service made it it easier for companies to blanket neighborhoods with junk mail. Starting this year, marketers no longer have to provide exact addresses when they send out fliers, letters or other junk mail on a designated route. The change is aimed at helping smaller businesses.

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And today's last word in business is: you've got junk mail.

The U.S. Postal Service just made it easier for companies to blanket your neighborhood with junk mail. Starting this year, marketers no longer have to provide exact addresses when they send out flyers or letters or other junk on a designated route. They only need to write the words postal customer, and the post office will deliver it to - whoever. The change is aimed at helping smaller businesses who now don't have to buy expensive mailing lists and address every envelope.

The Postal Service also hopes to bring in more business and keep snail mail growing as companies increasingly shift their marketing to the Internet.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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