JFK, Digitized: Presidential Archive Debuts Online

  • The inaugural address of John F. Kennedy, 35th President of the United States, on Jan. 20, 1961, in Washington, D.C.
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    The inaugural address of John F. Kennedy, 35th President of the United States, on Jan. 20, 1961, in Washington, D.C.
    U.S. Army Signal Corps/John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library/NPR
  • President Kennedy aboard the family yacht, the Honey Fitz, on Aug. 31, 1963, off Hyannis Port, Mass.
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    President Kennedy aboard the family yacht, the Honey Fitz, on Aug. 31, 1963, off Hyannis Port, Mass.
    Cecil Stoughton, White House/John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library/NPR
  • First lady Jacqueline Kennedy laughs as her son, John Jr., plays with her necklace in his White House bedroom in August 1962.
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    First lady Jacqueline Kennedy laughs as her son, John Jr., plays with her necklace in his White House bedroom in August 1962.
    Cecil Stoughton/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR
  • President Kennedy meets with the leaders of the March On Washington in the Oval Office on Aug. 28, 1963. At the meeting were (from left to right)  Labor Secretary Willard Wirtz, Mathew Ahmann, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, A. Philip Randolph, President Kennedy, Vice President  Lyndon Johnson, Walter Ruether, Whitney Young, Floyd McKissic...
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    President Kennedy meets with the leaders of the March On Washington in the Oval Office on Aug. 28, 1963. At the meeting were (from left to right) Labor Secretary Willard Wirtz, Mathew Ahmann, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, A. Philip Randolph, President Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon Johnson, Walter Ruether, Whitney Young, Floyd McKissick.
    Cecil Stoughton/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR
  • President Kennedy and his family, in Hyannis Port on Aug. 4, 1962.
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    President Kennedy and his family, in Hyannis Port on Aug. 4, 1962.
    Cecil Stoughton/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR
  • Brothers (from left) John, Robert and Edward Kennedy in Hyannis Port in 1960.
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    Brothers (from left) John, Robert and Edward Kennedy in Hyannis Port in 1960.
    John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR
  • Jackie Kennedy visits the Lake Palace in Udaipur, India, on March 16, 1962.
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    Jackie Kennedy visits the Lake Palace in Udaipur, India, on March 16, 1962.
    Cecil Stoughton/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR
  • President  Kennedy watches his daughter Caroline inspect a snowman made for her on the White House driveway on Feb. 4, 1961.
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    President Kennedy watches his daughter Caroline inspect a snowman made for her on the White House driveway on Feb. 4, 1961.
    Abbie Rowe/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR
  • Sen. George Smathers (D-FL), and President Kennedy  get a look at the Saturn rocket at Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Nov. 16, 1963.
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    Sen. George Smathers (D-FL), and President Kennedy get a look at the Saturn rocket at Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Nov. 16, 1963.
    Cecil Stoughton/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR
  • President Kennedy gets a look inside the Mercury capsule that was piloted by John Glenn (at Kennedy's right) on Feb. 23, 1962.
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    President Kennedy gets a look inside the Mercury capsule that was piloted by John Glenn (at Kennedy's right) on Feb. 23, 1962.
    Cecil Stoughton/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR
  • President Kennedy sails aboard the Manitou off the coast of Maine, Aug. 12, 1962.
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    President Kennedy sails aboard the Manitou off the coast of Maine, Aug. 12, 1962.
    Robert Knudsen/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NPR

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This month marks the 50th anniversary of the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy. It's an event that may seem like ancient history to some. But the Kennedy Library and the National Archives hope to make that history a bit more accessible.

On Thursday, they announced they have put all of the 35th president's important speeches, papers and recordings online at www.jfklibrary.org.

President Kennedy sails aboard the  Manitou off the coast of Maine, Aug. 12, 1962.

In one of the digitized images, President Kennedy sails aboard the Manitou off the coast of Maine on Aug. 12, 1962. Robert Knudsen/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library hide caption

itoggle caption Robert Knudsen/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

There, you can find famous memorabilia — such as the president's inaugural address from Jan. 20, 1961, in which he urged, "My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country."

But there are also lesser known items in the archives, including part of a 1962 TV and radio address on the admission of the first African-American to the University of Mississippi. "Mr. James Meredith is now in residence on the campus of the University of Mississippi," Kennedy said. "This has been accomplished thus far without the use of National Guard or other troops."

The Digital Archive includes more than 200,000 pages of speeches and notes, hundreds of reels of audio tape, and more than 1,000 recorded phone conversations. JFK Library Director Thomas Putnam says putting it online was a long and painstaking process.

Watch a video about the writing of Kennedy's inaugural address.

"It's been a four-year project, and again, it's very labor-intensive because all of these documents and photos weren't born digitally, so each one needs to be hand-scanned," he says.

The documents now online have been available at the brick-and-mortar JFK Library in Boston. But now anyone with access to a computer and the Internet can view firsthand drafts of Kennedy's inaugural, showing how the famous phrase "ask not what your country can do for you" evolved from "ask not what your country is going to do for you."

A notecard from Kennedy's speech in Berlin with phonetic spelling of "Ich bin ein Berliner," 26 June 1963. i i

A notecard from Kennedy's speech in Berlin with phonetic spelling of "Ich bin ein Berliner," 26 June 1963. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library hide caption

itoggle caption John F. Kennedy Presidential Library
A notecard from Kennedy's speech in Berlin with phonetic spelling of "Ich bin ein Berliner," 26 June 1963.

A notecard from Kennedy's speech in Berlin with phonetic spelling of "Ich bin ein Berliner," 26 June 1963.

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

Putnam's favorite find? "I really do love the conversations he has during the middle of the Cuban missile crisis. I mean, nothing can bring you closer to that moment about what he was trying to deal with than hearing, you know, even the laughter in the conversation between him and Eisenhower." (Listen to that phone conversation between Kennedy and former President Eisenhower.)

At a reception announcing the opening of the online archive, Caroline Kennedy said her father's example, words and spirit are more important than ever.

"Using today's technology, we will be able to give today's generation access to the historical record and challenge them to answer my father's call to service to solve the problems of our own time," she said.

The president's daughter contributed to the archive. Her name is carefully printed in her then 5-year-old's handwriting on the back of one of Kennedy's papers.

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