Business

Wheat Prices Push Cost Of Baguettes Higher

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Wheat prices on global markets have almost doubled in the last year. The increase, in part, is due to droughts and floods that have affected crops in wheat producing countries like Russia and Canada. Some French bakers are having to pass on the extra cost to consumers.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business is sacre bleu. In France, baguette prices are rising. The long, crusty loaves are the bread of life for this nation. French consume more than eight billion baguettes each year, according to Bloomberg News. That's about 23 million a day. But wheat prices on global markets have almost doubled over the last year, partly because of droughts and floods affecting crops in wheat-producing countries like Russia and Canada. So French bakeries are starting to pass on the higher costs to consumers in what amounts to about a few cents a loaf. There's no indication yet of any large-scale shift to the brioche or the croissant, or other French-baked goods.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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