Remembering Banker, Author Gordon Murray

For the past two years, Gordon Murray had been living with a deadly type of brain cancer and decided not to pursue further treatment. Murray died Saturday. He was the co-author of a best-selling book of investment advice, The Investment Answer. Host Robert Siegel has this remembrance.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

A remembrance now of a man who was on this program last month, retired investment banker Gordon Murray. He was upbeat, despite his prognosis.

Mr. GORDON MURRAY (Retired Investment Banker): It was six months ago that I was told I had six months to live.

SIEGEL: Gordon Murray died on Saturday at home in Burlingame, California. For the past two years, Murray had been living with a deadly type of brain cancer. A new tumor had formed, and he decided not to pursue further treatment.

Last month, I spoke with him about a book he wrote, and about living with a terminal illness.

Mr. MURRAY: I was surprised how meaningful it was helping other people, and that I really got great joy from that. I, in fact, I tell my kids now, if you start to feel sorry for yourself, just do something for someone else.

SIEGEL: And that's what Gordon Murray did. After a successful career on Wall Street, he set out to educate people on Main Street. And in the final year of his life, he and financial adviser Dan Goldie self-published a slim, smart book of investment advice called "The Investment Answer." It makes five points about how ordinary investors can avoid some common pitfalls. Thanks to coverage in the New York Times, Gordon Murray's story got out, and the book got a publisher.

Mr. MURRAY: You know, we hit a chord with people. There's something about dying banker...

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. MURRAY: Probably most people think is a good thing.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIEGEL: Gordon Murray maintained that humor, and an impressively positive outlook, until the end.

Mr. MURRAY: One of the good things about having one of these malignant glioblastomas is that you do get some time to get closure, to plan and to spend so much great time with your family and friends.

SIEGEL: Gordon Murray is survived by his wife and his two sons, and by his book, "The Investment Answer."

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