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'Use Your Words' by Kids and Explosions

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Kids And Explosions: Collage Art

Kids And Explosions: Collage Art

'Use Your Words' by Kids and Explosions

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In "Use Your Words," Kids and Explosions' Josh Raskin finds common ground between Emily Haines and Ol' Dirty Bastard. James Andrew Kachan/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption James Andrew Kachan/Courtesy of the artist

In "Use Your Words," Kids and Explosions' Josh Raskin finds common ground between Emily Haines and Ol' Dirty Bastard.

James Andrew Kachan/Courtesy of the artist

Thursday's Pick

Song: "Use Your Words"

Artist: Kids and Explosions

CD: S— Computer

Genre: Electronic

Mash-ups have gained a lot of credibility between the fall of Danger Mouse's infamous Grey Album and the rise of Girl Talk's overwhelming mega-mixes. There's just something marvelous about hearing seemingly mismatched ideas work together, as two worlds collide to a heavy beat.

Rather than highlighting music's differences, Kids & Explosions' Josh Raskin mixes songs together based on their surprising common ground, making them blend rhythmically and melodically. In "Use Your Words," Raskin takes apart the somber piano chords of Emily Haines' "The Maid Needs a Maid." He even touches her vocals up to have her mouth the words, "I love you" and "You are made for me" — sentiments far outside her song's original message.

More surprising is the harmonious entrance of an Ol' Dirty Bastard vocal off the hit song "Shimmy Shimmy Ya." Raskin even peppers the background with acoustic guitars from Beck's Sea Change, and it all fits. Who knew? A few Lauryn Hill verses hit the mix to top things off, but they're relentlessly split into spare words and consonants. With nothing unchanged or unedited, "Use Your Words" finds the true meaning of collage.

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