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Mattel, MGA Back In Court Over Bratz Dolls

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Mattel, MGA Back In Court Over Bratz Dolls

Business

Mattel, MGA Back In Court Over Bratz Dolls

Mattel, MGA Back In Court Over Bratz Dolls

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Toy rivals Mattel Inc. and MGA Entertainment Inc. on Tuesday began the second round of their lengthy legal battle over the rights to the wildly popular Bratz line,

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And in the toy industry there's a nasty fight that's been going on and on and on, which is why our last word in business today is Bratz.

For years Mattel and a smaller toy company MGA, have been duking it out over the rights to this popular doll. Bratz was MGA's prized product. Mattel says MGA stole the idea from Mattel.

First a court backed Mattel, then a panel of judges backed MGA. This week, the two sides are back in court. The smaller company, MGA, was again casting itself as David up against Goliath.

But a lawyer from Mattel shot back with this comment. She told the LA Times, at least David made his own slingshot and didn't steal it.

Of course, the jury is still out on the doll, not the slingshot.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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