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'My Father's Son' by Anthony D'Amato

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Anthony D'Amato: Warm And Magnetic

Anthony D'Amato: Warm And Magnetic

'My Father's Son' by Anthony D'Amato

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In the modern folk gem "My Father’s Son," Anthony D'Amato's protagonist struggles with inherited vices. i

In the modern folk gem "My Father’s Son," Anthony D'Amato's protagonist struggles with inherited vices. Diamond D Photography hide caption

toggle caption Diamond D Photography
In the modern folk gem "My Father’s Son," Anthony D'Amato's protagonist struggles with inherited vices.

In the modern folk gem "My Father’s Son," Anthony D'Amato's protagonist struggles with inherited vices.

Diamond D Photography

Wednesday's Pick

Song: "My Father's Son"

Artist: Anthony D'Amato

CD: Down Wires

Genre: Folk-Pop

Singer-songwriter Anthony D'Amato graduated from Princeton last year and, like many aspiring artists before him, headed to New York City to make a name for himself. But, unlike many of his predecessors, he's succeeding. D'Amato released his third album, Down Wires, this past October, and already he's earned spots supporting the likes of Ben Kweller and Pete Yorn. D'Amato may be yet another shaggy-haired, bearded musician, but the warmth and magnetism of his style of Americana set him apart.

D'Amato wrote, recorded and produced Down Wires in his college dorm room track by track, with just one microphone and a laptop. The process was time-consuming, but it yielded a modern folk gem in "My Father’s Son." The song begins with an irresistible melody — a simple, finger-picked pattern that runs throughout the song — perfectly complemented by electric guitars with a touch of distortion. Like a true folksinger, D'Amato weaves a vivid narrative with organic vocals, in this case addressing a son's struggle with inherited vices: a mother's alcoholism and a father's cowardice. His protagonist is defeated ("See me fall / Once I flew but now I crawl"), yet he gets back up again ("See me rise / Like Cassius Clay or Jesus Christ"). At just 22, D'Amato could develop as a songwriter in any number of ways. But, with his prolific pace, fans won't have to wait long to find out how.

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