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Family Of Slain Mexican Boy Sues Government

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Family Of Slain Mexican Boy Sues Government

Family Of Slain Mexican Boy Sues Government

Family Of Slain Mexican Boy Sues Government

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133116947/133116933" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this week's edition of "BackTalk", Tell Me More's "digital media guy," producer Lee Hill offers updates on stories covered on the program. Hill tells host Michel Martin about a new lawsuit by the family of a Mexican teenager, who was shot and killed by U-S border patrol agents last June. Also, hear which film featured on the program won big at the recent Golden Globe Awards.

MICHEL MARTIN, host:

And now it's time for Backtalk where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere and get to hear from you, our listeners. Lee Hill, our digital media guy is here with me, as he is most Fridays. Hi, Lee, what's up?

LEE HILL: Hey, Michel, a couple of updates this week. Last June, we reported on our blog about Sergio Hernandez Guereca. The 15-year-old boy was shot and killed by a U.S. Border Patrol agent. Sergio was allegedly part of a group throwing rocks at agents as they tried to detain illegal immigrants on the U.S. side of the border near El Paso. He was shot twice, once in the head.

Well, on Monday, the boy's family announced it was suing the government and U.S. Customs and Border Protection for his death. Hernandez's parents don't buy the border agent's account of the shooting. Here's the family's attorney Bill Hilliard at a press conference earlier this week.

Mr. BILL HILLIARD (Attorney): He was standing on the Mexican side of the border. He was unarmed and he was 15 years old.

HILL: Now, Michel, the family is reportedly asking for $25 million in damages.

Also, last summer, on a lighter note, we talked about gay films going mainstream, and in particular, a new release entitled "The Kids Are All Right." It's the story of a lesbian couple raising two kids who were conceived via an anonymous sperm donor. Here's a clip.

(Soundbite of film, "The Kids Are All Right")

Ms. ANNETTE BENING (Actor): (As Nic) Your mom and I sense that there's some other stuff going on in your life. We just want to be let in.

Mr. JOSH HUTCHERSON (Actor): (As Laser) What do you mean?

Ms. JULIANNE MOORE (Actor): (As Jules) Are you having a relationship with someone?

Ms. BENING: You can tell us, honey. We would understand and support you.

Mr. HUTCHERSON: Look, I only met him once.

Ms. BENING: What do you mean, once?

Ms. MOORE: Did he find you online?

Mr. HUTCHERSON: Wait, what?

Ms. BENING: Wait, wait, who did you meet once?

Mr. HUTCHERSON: Paul.

Ms. MOORE: Paul? Who's Paul?

Mr. HUTCHERSON: I met him with Joni.

Ms. MOORE: Why was Joni there?

Mr. HUTCHERSON: She set it up.

Ms. BENING: Will you forget the set up? Who's Paul?

Mr. HUTCHERSON: Our sperm donor.

HILL: Well, earlier this week at the Golden Globes, the Hollywood Foreign Press gave the movie a thumbs up. Actress Annette Bening took the award for best actress in a musical or comedy and the film itself won for best musical or comedy.

MARTIN: Well, congratulations. Well, thank you, Lee.

HILL: Thank you, Michel.

MARTIN: And, remember, with TELL ME MORE the conversation never ends. To tell us more, you can call our comment line at 202-842-3522. Again, that's 202-842-3522. Please remember to leave your name. You can also find us on Twitter. Just look for TELL ME MORE, NPR, or go to npr.org, click on Programs, then on TELL ME MORE and blog it out.

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