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Ariz. Shooting Suspect's Family Must Also Grieve

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Ariz. Shooting Suspect's Family Must Also Grieve

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Ariz. Shooting Suspect's Family Must Also Grieve

Ariz. Shooting Suspect's Family Must Also Grieve

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Rep. Gabrielle Giffords continues to recover in a Houston hospital. Her husband, Mark Kelly, says that he's open to meeting with the parents of the man who allegedly shot his wife. Kelly recently told ABC News, "They've got to be hurting ... as much as anybody." Host Liane Hansen reflects on what the parents of Jared Loughner have experienced since the Tuscon shootings.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Randy and Amy Loughner have been living in virtual seclusion since the events of January 8th. The parents of Jared Loughner rarely leave their Tucson home, and have few visitors. They're also emotionally isolated. Few know what it's like to be the relative of a person who is accused of committing a horrible crime.

As Joseph Goldstein wrote in the New York Times, the Loughners have now, quote: joined a circle whose membership is a curse, unquote.

In that circle, you can find Robert Hyde of Albuquerque. His brother killed five people, including two police officers. David Kaczynski, the brother of the man known as the Unabomber, is also a member. Both men have reached out to the Loughners.

David Kaczynski called Loughner's public defender. He left a message that he was available to listen if the parents wanted to talk to someone with a similar experience. Robert Hyde sent a letter to the Loughner's home. It was an invitation to contact him, and to tell them that what happened was not their fault.

But perhaps the most charitable response has come from Captain Mark Kelly, the husband of Gabrielle Giffords, the congresswoman who was wounded in the Tucson shootings. This past week, he told ABC News that he was open to the idea of meeting with the Loughners. In his words: They've got to be hurting in this situation as much as anybody.

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