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Energy Shortage Leaves South Koreans Cold
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Energy Shortage Leaves South Koreans Cold

Asia

Energy Shortage Leaves South Koreans Cold

Energy Shortage Leaves South Koreans Cold
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As the temperatures dropped, South Korea struggles to keep up with increased demand for electricity. The South Koreans don't have a lot of excess capacity. If the country continues its high energy rate, government officials say some regions could face a blackout.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And let's get an update now on South Korea, where temperatures dipped to zero degrees Fahrenheit over the weekend. That's the lowest they've been in almost a century. And as the temperatures drop, the country has struggled to keep up with the increased demand for electricity.

South Koreans don't have a lot of excess capacity. And if the country continues using energy at this rate, government officials say that some regions could face a blackout.

So, the government has ordered workplaces to keep the thermostat at 64 degrees or lower through the end of the month. Space heaters are banned. And during some hours of the day, the heat must be turned off altogether.

"The Christian Science Monitor" reports that workers have been advised that if they don't like it, they can always go to work in thermal underwear.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION, from NPR News.

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