Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Panel Round Two

More questions for the panel: Thinking Outside the Box (and Over the Wall), and Dr. Bozo Will See You Now.

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PETER SAGAL, Host:

Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Brian, every day, drug smugglers are finding new ways to get their product into the United States. This week, a cartel was busted just south of the Arizona border, transporting marijuana how?

BRIAN BABYLON: That's funny that I do know this answer.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We're not going to read anything into it, we're just going to think you're well informed.

BABYLON: I'm going to say catapult.

SAGAL: Yes, via catapult.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

BABYLON: It's so funny that I know that.

SAGAL: Surveillance cameras caught four men using a catapult to launch bales of weed over the border fence. The suspects were able to get away from border agents, which is remarkable, given how hard it is to run in a full suit of armor.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All of the sudden, our respect for Mexican drug smugglers went way up, right?

BABYLON: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: That's science behind that.

SAGAL: I know.

BABYLON: It's science.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Can you imagine though, you're a 16-year-old kid, bored to death, walking down the street in some border town in Arizona, going God, my life is so dull. And then you look up.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: That would be like manna from heaven.

SAGAL: Almost literally.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Brian, in vitro fertilization is often stressful for women hoping to get pregnant. It's a tough situation. Sometimes it doesn't work. But a new study reveals women can increase their chances of getting pregnant after IVF if they then expose themselves to what?

BABYLON: Sputnik moments.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: Sunshine.

SAGAL: No.

FAITH SALIE: Think one of Robin Williams' worst movies. I know it's a long list.

SAGAL: That is long.

KYRIE O: Wow.

BABYLON: Flubber?

SAGAL: That is good. No.

BABYLON: "Jumanji". I don't know, I mean, come on.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We'll be here all day.

SALIE: Big red nose.

BABYLON: Oh.

SAGAL: Yeah.

BABYLON: Oh, laughter.

SAGAL: Yeah, well, specifically clowns.

SALIE: Bad comedy.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

BABYLON: Really?

SAGAL: Bad comedy or clowning.

BABYLON: Clowns.

CONNOR: Oh come on.

SAGAL: There's this Israeli...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: I don't believe that.

SAGAL: It's true. So there's this Israeli fertility doctor who has a background in mime and clowning, which sounds like the premise for like the worst horror movie ever.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And what he would do is he would do - he'd have IVF patients and after the procedure, he'd come in and do a clown routine. And he found that those women go pregnant a significantly higher percentage of the time than the woman who didn't get clowning.

BABYLON: Like balloon animals...

SALIE: God, I would be so stressed out.

SAGAL: Oh balloon animals?

CONNOR: Yeah.

SAGAL: No, we were thinking about this. It's like, what would it be like to have a clown as your ob/gyn. He's like, as you say, balloon animals. He's like, well let me show you a model of your uterus. He's like...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Tie, tie, tie, tie. Okay, here, right there, that's your cervix.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So you're thinking, like, wouldn't it be so much easier to be a clown, wouldn't it be so much easier to be a clown urologist.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Be like, there you go. Boom.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

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