Girl Scouts Jettison Bad Selling Cookies

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It's that time of year when boxes and boxes of Girl Scout cookies begin filling up the pantry — though they usually don't stay there for long. Last year, troops sold nearly 200 million boxes. In an effort to boost sales and cut costs, the Girl Scouts are looking to streamline their cookie line up. Those that haven't sold well — like Dulce de Leche and Thank U Berry Munch — are no longer available in certain parts of the country.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And todays last word in business is cookies.

It's that time of year when boxes and boxes of Girl Scout cookies begin filling up the pantry, though they usually don't stay for very long. Last year, troops sold nearly 200 million boxes, accounting for almost two-thirds of the Girl Scouts' budget. But in an effort to boost sales and cut costs, the Girl Scouts are looking to streamline their cookie line. Cookies that have not sold well are no longer available in certain parts of the country. Some Americans will have to do without cookies called Dulce de Leche or Thank You Berry Munch. Thin Mints, presumably, still available everywhere.

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That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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