Ex-Mayor Breaks Pledge, Wears Long Pants Mayor Eddie Favre of Bay St. Louis, Miss., lost everything in Hurricane Katrina but the clothes he was wearing. Favre vowed to wear only Bermuda shorts until his town recovered. In 2009, he finished his time as mayor in shorts. The Sun Herald reports Favre wore khaki pants recently to testify at a trial. He said he didn't want to offend the judge.
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Ex-Mayor Breaks Pledge, Wears Long Pants

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Ex-Mayor Breaks Pledge, Wears Long Pants

Ex-Mayor Breaks Pledge, Wears Long Pants

Ex-Mayor Breaks Pledge, Wears Long Pants

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Mayor Eddie Favre of Bay St. Louis, Miss., lost everything in Hurricane Katrina but the clothes he was wearing. Favre vowed to wear only Bermuda shorts until his town recovered. In 2009, he finished his time as mayor in shorts. The Sun Herald reports Favre wore khaki pants recently to testify at a trial. He said he didn't want to offend the judge.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Mayor Eddie Favre of Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, lost everything in Hurricane Katrina - everything but his clothes, including a pair of Bermuda shorts. He vowed to wear only shorts until his town recovered. In 2006, Favre met President George W. Bush in shorts. In 2009, he finished his time as mayor, in shorts. Now the�Sun Herald�reports that Favre wore khaki pants. He was testifying at a trial, didn't want to offend the judge.

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