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A Super Beard For The Super Bowl

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A Super Beard For The Super Bowl

Strange News

A Super Beard For The Super Bowl

A Super Beard For The Super Bowl

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Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel has had a solid 9-year career and is expected to play a key role in Super Bowl 45. But, as host Scott Simon reports, Keisel will be best remembered for his beard.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Some of the odder stories in the days leading up to this Super Bowl have been about the hair on Brett Keisel's chin. Mr. Keisel, who's a defensive end for the Pittsburgh Steelers, has a huge blondish growth below his nose that looks as if a beaver had crawled into his mouth and was hanging on for dear life. Inevitably it's been dubbed Superbeard.

Mr. Keisel began to grow his beard last June while on a hunting trip with his father. Then went to training camp, and when the Steelers kept winning games, he decided to keep the beard. The past few months, the beard has been the subject of songs, websites, and celebrations. The Beaver County, Pennsylvania Times called it: the scruff of legend.

Mr. Keisel says there are not a lot of jobs in America where your boss is going to say, you know what? That's a good look. Make sure you keep coming to work looking like that. Mr. Keisel says that hairballs are a problem, but that he uses shampoo, conditioner, and an occasional combing, quote, "to brush the birds and squirrels out."

People are saying that I'm taking beard-enhancing drugs, he told a press conference this week. But I'm not.

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