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Detroit Mayor Bing Rejects RoboCop Statue Request

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Detroit Mayor Bing Rejects RoboCop Statue Request

Business

Detroit Mayor Bing Rejects RoboCop Statue Request

Detroit Mayor Bing Rejects RoboCop Statue Request

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133583971/133576025" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chrysler featured Detroit in a well-received Super Bowl ad. A web user had another idea to boost the city's brand. He sent a tweet to Mayor Dave Bing suggesting the city hoist a statue of RoboCop. The 1987 film takes place in Detroit. Mayor Bing tweeted back that he has no such plans.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

A today's last word in business comes from Detroit. The word is Cyborg City.

A W: A Web user who goes by the name M.T. sent a tweet to the Mayor of Detroit, Dave Bing, suggesting that he support a statue of RoboCop. The same way that Philadelphia has a statue of its favorite fictional son, Rocky.

RoboCop is the superhuman police officer from the 1987 film that takes place in Detroit.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "ROBOCOP")

Unidentified Man (Actor): (as character) What are your prime directives?

PETER WELLER: (as RoboCop): To serve the public trust, protect the innocent, uphold the law.

INSKEEP: M.T. writes that RoboCop would kick Rocky's butt. He's a great ambassador for Detroit. Then again, he is in a movie that portrays Detroit as a dystopia.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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