Bernard Shaw: A Journalist Extraordinaire

Anchorman Bernard Shaw attends the 23rd Annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards on September 10, 2002 at the Mariott Marquis Hotel in New York. i i

Anchorman Bernard Shaw attends the 23rd Annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards on September 10, 2002 at the Mariott Marquis Hotel in New York. Mark Mainz/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Mainz/Getty Images
Anchorman Bernard Shaw attends the 23rd Annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards on September 10, 2002 at the Mariott Marquis Hotel in New York.

Anchorman Bernard Shaw attends the 23rd Annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards on September 10, 2002 at the Mariott Marquis Hotel in New York.

Mark Mainz/Getty Images

February is Black History Month and Tell Me More observes the month with a series of short vignettes. In this installment, NPR's Lee Hill shares his black history hero.

I'm Lee Hill, digital media producer here at Tell Me More, and my black history hero is legendary journalist and anchorman Bernard Shaw.

Growing up in our house, family life centered on three core regimens: we went to school, we went to church, and every night, we watched the news.

Bernard Shaw was the one black anchorman on national TV, who seemed to have all the information you needed to know. You had a sense that he knew he'd earned people's trust.

When I would watch him, my mom would say to me, "you could do that."

Bernard Shaw was born in 1940 and worked in network television before joining CNN in 1980 - the year I was born. Throughout his 20-year career at CNN he racked up major journalism awards. He was indeed a role model, whose career I found so noble it inspired my own.

He stopped by NPR after he retired to talk about his career and, despite early racial hurdles, how he knew he would succeed:

There was nothing that made me think that I could not or would not. My attitude was this is what I want to do. I can make a contribution to this craft, and I wasn't thinking color.

Mr. Shaw, thanks, for making the world smarter.

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