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Letters: Winter Wallops Wallets And Snail Mail

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Letters: Winter Wallops Wallets And Snail Mail

From Our Listeners

Letters: Winter Wallops Wallets And Snail Mail

Letters: Winter Wallops Wallets And Snail Mail

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Talk of the Nation listeners wrote to the show to share their stories about how dramatic winter storms have taken a financial toll on their businesses and households. And other listeners wrote to extol the virtues of traditional mail.

NEAL CONAN, host:

It's Tuesday, and time to read from your emails and Web comments.

The talk of the nation last week was snow. A massive winter storm dumped a lot of it, from Dallas to Boston. We asked how winter's wallop affected your wallet. Jim Mill's(ph) email from Cincinnati: Our last few electric bills have been about 200 percent more than the spring, fall average, so they're hitting about 300 to $350 each. Ouch. Then, figure another $6 a week for rock salt, but that's small potatoes in comparison. Let's hope Punxsutawney Phil was right -bring on the spring. Love the show, he added, but not the snow.

Another word on winter from - where else? - Alaska. Cathy Anderson(ph) asked: What storm? Sunny and 32 degrees here in Anchorage. Send us some of your snow.

Well, you can't send that through the post office, but columnist Meghan Daum complained last week that too many people don't send anything in the mail anymore. We talked with her about her ode to snail mail.

Coleena Washington(ph) in Carbondale, Colorado, agreed that a card is worth much more than the paper it's printed on. It's like getting a present and it clearly communicates that someone is not just thinking about you, but they value you. In our current society, time is money. So when someone handwrites a letter or a note, they've taken a portion of their valuable time and spent it on you.

We're trying not to read anything into the fact that she sent us that note by email.

Anna Grace Shackman(ph) in Webster Groves, Missouri, added her favorite mailman story: One summer day, my mother went to the front door to get the mail. There below her, on the wide front porch, the mailman sat, engrossed in our copy of Opera News. He was embarrassed, but Mom was delighted to know he liked opera.

And finally, Edward Peery(ph) in Arizona emailed to complain that we credited the wrong person with the famous phrase: You may fool all the people some of the time, you could even fool some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time. A caller cited Abraham Lincoln. I credited P.T. Barnum. According to the book "The Quote Verifier," Lincoln historians doubt it was Honest Abe and have no idea who coined the phrase. In which case, I'm sticking with Bridgeport's Baron of Ballyhoo, Mr. Barnum.

And as always, if you have comments, questions or corrections for us, the best way to reach us is by email. The address is talk@npr.org. Please let us know where you're writing from and give us some help on how to pronounce your name.

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