Chronic Dysfunction Found In Death Investigations

A forensic pathologist prepares for an autopsy at The New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator. i

A forensic pathologist prepares for an autopsy at The New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR
A forensic pathologist prepares for an autopsy at The New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator.

A forensic pathologist prepares for an autopsy at The New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator.

John W. Poole/NPR

Guests

Lowell Bergman, producer and correspondent, PBS' Frontline
A.C. Thompson, staff reporter, ProPublica
Dr. Marcella Fierro, retired Chief Medical Examiner, Virginia

TV shows often depict forensic pathologists as champions of the dead, solving crimes with high-tech tools and specialized know-how. But the reality of death investigation is much different. A joint Frontline-NPR-ProPublica investigation uncovered pervasive dysfunction in many death investigations.

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