NPR logo

Hayes Carll, In Concert

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133660982/133685460" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Hayes Carll, In Concert

Concerts

Hayes Carll, In Concert

Hayes Carll, In Concert

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133660982/133685460" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Texas folk singer-songwriter Hayes Carll will take the World Cafe Live stage at noon ET. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the artist

Texas folk singer-songwriter Hayes Carll will take the World Cafe Live stage at noon ET.

Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "Bye Bye Baby"
  • "Hard Out Here"
  • "Chances Are"
  • "KMAG YOYO"
  • "Grand Parade"
  • "The Letter"
  • "Bottle In My Hand"
  • "Hide Me"

Hayes Carll is a dry-witted folk musician whose humble music is poised, but infused with humorous anecdotes. Hailing from Texas, the singer-songwriter first picked up a guitar at the age of 15. He followed a common route, college and then singing on the side, moving around Texas in search of success. But his music is anything but common. He eventually returned to Houston, his hometown, and began to develop a following. That's where he released his first album, 2002's Flowers Liquor.

Almost a decade later, Carll has racked up a list of achievements, written three more full-lengths, and spent a good deal of time on the road, honing his craft and receiving inspiration. Carll has been named best folk and best new artist by the Houston Press, he's written music with Guy Clark and Ray Wylie Hubbard, and he's largely recognized as a lead man in a resurgence of Texas artists greatly influenced by Townes Van Zandt and Bob Dylan.

Carll's latest release is KMAG YOYO, a military acronym standing for "Kiss My Ass Guys, You're on Your Own." Listen to his set from WXPN's World Cafe Live, as part of the station's Live Fridays concert series.

Support XPN

Stories like these are made possible by contributions from readers and listeners like you.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.