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Protesters Start 'We Won't Pay' Movement In Greece

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Protesters Start 'We Won't Pay' Movement In Greece

Economy

Protesters Start 'We Won't Pay' Movement In Greece

Protesters Start 'We Won't Pay' Movement In Greece

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133674868/133674846" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The economic collapse of Greece was precipitated by the countries massive national debt, caused in part by Greeks not paying their taxes. Now there's a growing protest movement against the government's austerity measures.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Europe's latest financial trouble is at the top of NPR's business news.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: From Athens, Joanna Kakissis reports.

JOANNA KAKISSIS: The We Won't Pay movement is growing, and it encourages Greeks to ignore all rules, says Aristides Hatzis, a law professor at the University of Athens who says Greeks have a history of avoiding taxes.

ARISTIDES HATZIS: Sixty percent, 60 percent of Greeks do not pay taxes. Of course, someone is going to pay for this - for the tolls, for the taxes, for the deficit, for everything.

KAKISSIS: Hatzis says Greeks don't pay taxes because they don't trust their institutions.

HATZIS: The people in many situations feel that they have the right to break the law.

KAKISSIS: For NPR News, I'm Joanna Kakissis in Athens.

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